NPR

People With HIV Are Panicking Due To Tanzania's Crackdown On Gays

The government is targeting gays and groups seen as promoting homosexuality. HIV clinics fear they'll be shut down. Patients say they're afraid to come in for their medications.
Dar es Salaam, Tanzania - November 16, 2016: A gay man with HIV stands in a clinic in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Due to the government's crackdown on the gay community, the man has been afraid to pick his medicine up for two weeks, in spite of the massive risks to his health. (Photo by Kevin Sief / The Washington Post via Getty Images)

"I'm alone in this world," sobs the woman, tears smudging her black eyeliner as she clutches a handbag with medicine inside — antiretroviral pills for HIV.

Wearing a hijab that covers her long hair, a traditional Arabic dress with roses and wedge heels, she sits in the office of a community group that offers support to LGBT sex workers, trying to regain her composure. "Princess Shadya," as she is known to friends, is transgender and identifies as a woman. And she lives in Tanzania, where LGBT people are increasingly coming under attack from the government.

"I'm getting worried if they know I'm transgender they will

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from NPR

NPR4 min readNutrition
If We All Ate Enough Fruits And Vegetables, There'd Be Big Shortages
There's already not enough produce for everyone in the world to get the daily recommended amount. Two new studies urge revamping the food system to feed the growing population and protect the planet.
NPR7 min read
History, Minus The Historian Herself
Does NPR have a gender problem? A history problem? Over the weekend, a Washington Post blog called The Lily published a very good piece about an infuriating situation involving Here & Now, the two-hour daily news and talk program that is co-produced
NPR4 min read
Fired Over Too Much Tupac? A Rap-Loving Bureaucrat From Iowa Says He Hopes Not
The former head of Iowa's Department of Human Services says that, ideally, his dismissal will lead to "having open discussions about race and what we have in common, instead of what separates us."