The Atlantic

Catastrophe and the Comedy of the Self-Aware Marriage

Season 3 of Amazon’s show is funnier than ever as it portrays a couple negotiating serious issues with a smirk.
Source: Ed Miller / Amazon Prime Video

Toward the end of the first episode of Catastrophe’s third season, Sharon sits down on a couch next to her husband Rob after confessing that she’s betrayed his trust. She asks a question: “What now?”

Rob re-etches his magnificent block of a face, and what had been stoic rage at his wife’s betrayal becomes resignation. “I don’t know,” he says. “I guess over time I’ll have to learn to forgive you.”

“Right,” Sharon says, her brows knotting and her lip twitching, a picture of worry and shame. “Over how much time?”

“I don’t know. I guess it’ll take two or three months. A

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