NPR

'Patron Saints Of Nothing' Is A Book For 'The Hyphenated'

Young adult author Randy Ribay says it's tough having "a dual identity" in a world "where people want you to be one thing." His new novel explores the Philippine government's deadly war on drugs.
Source: Penguin Young Readers

Young adult author Randy Ribay is Filipino American and says his latest book Patron Saints Of Nothing is dedicated to people like him: "The Hyphenated," he calls them. And not just Filipino Americans, Ribay tells NPR's Morning Edition, but also anyone else who would consider themselves more than one thing.

"The difficulty with a dual identity is just trying to figure out what does it mean to be more than one thing in a world where people want you to be one thing," he says.

Ribay explores these

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from NPR

NPR4 min readWellness
Study: Sugar Rules The World And Ruins Teeth
The authors of a new study say dental health is especially bad in low- and middle-income countries — and that Big Sugar works to make sure soda and candy aren't targeted as cavity culprits.
NPR2 min readPolitics
Opinion: Should Republicans Still Call Themselves The Party Of Lincoln?
In defending the president's racist tweets, House Republican leader Kevin McCarthy declared, "We are the party of Lincoln." NPR's Scott Simon contends President Lincoln would object.
NPR3 min read
Bowen Yang And Matt Rogers: I Don't Think So, Honey!
Comedians and co-hosts of Las Culturistas, Bowen Yang and Matt Rogers discuss their lives before comedy and how they became friends. Then they get competitive in two games about honey and pop divas.