The Atlantic

Should Human Feces Be Regulated Like a Drug?

A fecal-transplant patient has unexpectedly died just as the FDA is deciding the future of the unconventional procedure.
Source: Lois S. Wiggs / CDC

For the past several years, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has been trying to figure out how to regulate human feces.

Fecal transplants are an for a gut infection called . The microbes in the stool of a healthy donor repopulate the gut microbiome of a sick patient. But some: An immunocompromised patient died after acquiring drug-resistant bacteria from a stool donor.

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