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From the Publisher

Interviews don't just count-they count the most!

Regardless of how well you write resumes and letters, conduct research, and network for job leads, you simply must do well in the face-to-face job interview if you are to get the job offer. But conducting an effective interview is easier said than done. Your initial surge of joy in getting the interview may quickly turn into a case of sweaty palms, dry mouth, churning stomach, and wobbly knees.

No more, say Drs. Caryl and Ron Krannich, two of America's leading experts. Using an employer-centered approach, you want to nail the job interview by being prepared to respond well to critical interview questions. You do this by anticipating questions, considering thoughtful and compelling answers, focusing on your accomplishments, asking intelligent questions, and handling the interview situation with ease and confidence.

If you know how to communicate well with employers, both verbally and nonverbally, you should be able to conduct a dynamite job interview that results in a job offer!
Published: Listen & Live Audio on
ISBN: 9781593163020
Abridged
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