• audiobook

From the Publisher

At least one-third of the people we know are introverts. They are the ones who prefer listening to speaking, reading to partying; who innovate and create but dislike self-promotion; who favor working on their own over brainstorming in teams. Although they are often labeled "quiet," it is to introverts that we owe many of the great contributions to society--from van Gogh's sunflowers to the invention of the personal computer.

Passionately argued, impressively researched, and filled with indelible stories of real people, Quiet shows how dramatically we undervalue introverts, and how much we lose in doing so. Taking the reader on a journey from Dale Carnegie's birthplace to Harvard Business School, from a Tony Robbins seminar to an evangelical megachurch, Susan Cain charts the rise of the Extrovert Ideal in the twentieth century and explores its far-reaching effects. She talks to Asian-American students who feel alienated from the brash, backslapping atmosphere of American schools. She questions the dominant values of American business culture, where forced collaboration can stand in the way of innovation, and where the leadership potential of introverts is often overlooked. And she draws on cutting-edge research in psychology and neuroscience to reveal the surprising differences between extroverts and introverts.

Perhaps most inspiring, she introduces us to successful introverts--from a witty, high-octane public speaker who recharges in solitude after his talks, to a record-breaking salesman who quietly taps into the power of questions. Finally, she offers invaluable advice on everything from how to better negotiate differences in introvert-extrovert relationships to how to empower an introverted child to when it makes sense to be a "pretend extrovert."

This extraordinary book has the power to permanently change how we see introverts and, equally important, how introverts see themselves.

Published: Random House Audio on
ISBN: 9781415959138
Unabridged
Listen on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Quiet by Susan Cain and Kathe Mazur
With a 30 day free trial you can listen to one free audiobook per month

    Related Articles

    Entrepreneur
    7 min read
    Leadership & Mentoring

    A Winning Personality: Why Ambiverts Make Great Entrepreneurs

    Steve Ballmer is a maniac. Just days into the new year, the rookie owner of the NBA’s Los Angeles Clippers took the internet by storm when he leaped from his courtside seat at Staples Center and began wildly gyrating to the music of halftime performer Fergie—a dance described by media outlets as “whacked out,” “hilariously insane” and “enraged and ecstatic all at the same time.”  The spectacle was nothing new to anyone who recalls Ballmer’s 14-year tenure as Microsoft CEO: Bill Gates’ handpicked successor was a notoriously towering presence at software developer conferences and industry events
    Entrepreneur
    2 min read
    Entrepreneurship

    This Multi-Millionaire Founder Drove an Uber to Learn About Customer Service

    Last year, Paul English signed up to be an Uber driver. As a multimillionaire, he didn’t need the money, obviously. He wanted to understand what it’s like to be rated. Related: 4 Assumptions Needed to Deliver 5-Star Customer Service It’s an eye-opening experience that company executives rarely get. Reviewers tend to react to a customer service agent, or the skill of the chef in a kitchen, or, well, the driver behind the wheel. And yet those reviews can impact an entire business. “Reviews provide a first stop for any potential customer to understand a product from a consumer point of view, deli
    Inc.
    3 min read

    Every Company Has A Secret Product

    Jason Fried IF YOUR COMPANY MAKES four products, it really makes five. If it makes 12, it makes 13. Even companies that make just one thing actually make two. The secret product? The company itself. Your company is a product. Who are its customers? Your employees, who use it to do their jobs. Since your company is the product that makes all of your other products, it should be the best product of all. When you begin to think of your company this way, you evaluate it differently. You ask different questions about it. You look at improving it constantly, rather than just accepting what it’s b