• audiobook

From the Publisher

From award-winning columnist and journalist Gillian Tett comes a brilliant examination of how our tendency to create functional departments-silos-hinders our work…and how some people and organizations can break those silos down to unleash innovation.

One of the characteristics of industrial age enterprises is that they are organized around functional departments. This organizational structure results in both limited information and restricted thinking. The Silo Effect asks these basic questions: why do humans working in modern institutions collectively act in ways that sometimes seem stupid? Why do normally clever people fail to see risks and opportunities that later seem blindingly obvious? Why, as psychologist Daniel Kahneman put it, are we sometimes so "blind to our own blindness"?

Gillian Tett, journalist and senior editor for the Financial Times, answers these questions by plumbing her background as an anthropologist and her experience reporting on the financial crisis in 2008. In The Silo Effect, she shares eight different tales of the silo syndrome, spanning Bloomberg's City Hall in New York, the Bank of England in London, Cleveland Clinic hospital in Ohio, UBS bank in Switzerland, Facebook in San Francisco, Sony in Tokyo, the BlueMountain hedge fund, and the Chicago police. Some of these narratives illustrate how foolishly people can behave when they are mastered by silos. Others, however, show how institutions and individuals can master their silos instead. These are stories of failure and success.

From ideas about how to organize office spaces and lead teams of people with disparate expertise, Tett lays bare the silo effect and explains how people organize themselves, interact with each other, and imagine the world can take hold of an organization and lead from institutional blindness to 20/20 vision.
Published: Simon & Schuster Audio on
ISBN: 9781442391710
Unabridged
Listen on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for The Silo Effect by Fiona Hardingham and Gillian Tett
With a 30 day free trial you can listen to one free audiobook per month

    Related Articles

    Inc.
    2 min read
    Psychology

    How I Hire Employees

    AS TOLD TO K.F. FIRST, we determine the DNA of each job, which shows us the personality we need for the right team fit, the individual skill set needed so someone won’t be learning on our dime, and the psychology of the person we need. We describe that in great detail. THEN WE focus on: Can she do the job? Is she the right team fit? Will she do the job long-term well? We ask what her goals are and if she is aligned with the job. WE GIVE our candidates a personality test that, among other things, answers the question: What is the person’s nature? Everyone is a mix of, I’ll use the shorthand,
    Inc.
    1 min read
    Psychology

    The Upside of Outliers

    Greater loyalty “There’s a secret sauce in hiring a person who knows that I believe in him enough to take a chance,” says David Williams, CEO of Fishbowl, an inventory software firm near Salt Lake City. Williams has hired everyone from his electrician to a guy who sold him a snowboard, and he’s more likely to size up someone’s creativity, sharp wit, and patience than what industry he or she hails from. That talent strategy has helped Williams steer Fishbowl to seven consecutive years on the Inc. 5000—and achieve remarkably low turnover. Challenged norms “Long tenure in any industry comes with
    Nautilus
    1 min read
    Science

    Spark of Science: Robbert Dijkgraaf: The director of the Institute for Advanced Study on the wonders of his childhood attic.

    Robbert Dijkgraaf will sometimes let himself drift back to his childhood attic in the Netherlands. It was there that he did some of his first physics experiments, playing with discarded binocular optics that his father kept stacked in boxes. As he has risen to take the leadership of the Institute for Advanced Study, one of the world’s most prestigious academic institutions, those early experiences have not lost their power. “It’s very important to go back to the origin of your passion,” he says. They have also helped to shape his ideas about science education. Like many educators we talk to, D