From the Publisher

A handsome, commemorative edition of Peter F. Drucker's timeless classic work on leadership and management, with a foreword by Jim Collins.

What makes an effective executive?

For decades, Peter F. Drucker was widely regarded as "the dean of this country's business and management philosophers" (Wall Street Journal). In this concise and brilliant work, he looks to the most influential position in management-the executive.

The measure of the executive, Drucker reminds us, is the ability to "get the right things done." This usually involves doing what other people have overlooked as well as avoiding what is unproductive. Intelligence, imagination, and knowledge may all be wasted in an executive job without the acquired habits of mind that mold them into results.

Drucker identifies five practices essential to business effectiveness that can-and must-be mastered:

Managing time; Choosing what to contribute to the organization; Knowing where and how to mobilize strength for best effect; Setting the right priorities; Knitting all of them together with effective decision-making

Ranging across the annals of business and government, Drucker demonstrates the distinctive skill of the executive and offers fresh insights into old and seemingly obvious business situations.

Published: HarperAudio on
ISBN: 0060318252
Unabridged
Listen on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for The Effective Executive by Peter F. Drucker, Jim Collins,...
With a 30 day free trial you can listen to one free audiobook per month

    Related Articles

    Entrepreneur
    2 min read
    Leadership & Mentoring

    9 Ways to Become a Better Leader

    Encourage employees to disagree with you. Companies get into trouble when everyone is afraid to speak truth to power. "If all you hear is how great you're doing, that should be a danger sign," says executive coach Ray Williams. Don't micromanage. Empower the people below you, then leave them alone. "A good part of leadership is stepping back," says Bill Pasmore, senior vice president at the Center for Creative Leadership. "A good leader leads from front and back." When people err, don't destroy them.But make sure they learn whatever lessons there are to be learned from their mistakes. Show com
    Entrepreneur
    3 min read
    Leadership & Mentoring

    What to Do When Your Boss Doesn't Trust You

    Q: I work part time at a company. My desk sits out of the owner’s view. After I called in sick for a few days thanks to a case of shingles, the owner had his administrative assistant—also a part-time employee—tell me they can’t trust the hours on my timecard because they can’t see when I arrive or leave, and I “could be ripping them off.” I’m insulted. I report hours accurately, have been there a year and resent that a peer was sent to deliver this message to me. My initial instinct was to quit. How should I handle this?  A: Your experience underscores some ethical problems that can be avoided
    Inc.
    2 min read
    Psychology

    How I Hire Employees

    AS TOLD TO K.F. FIRST, we determine the DNA of each job, which shows us the personality we need for the right team fit, the individual skill set needed so someone won’t be learning on our dime, and the psychology of the person we need. We describe that in great detail. THEN WE focus on: Can she do the job? Is she the right team fit? Will she do the job long-term well? We ask what her goals are and if she is aligned with the job. WE GIVE our candidates a personality test that, among other things, answers the question: What is the person’s nature? Everyone is a mix of, I’ll use the shorthand,