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From the Publisher

In this candid autobiography, Amway cofounder Rich DeVos reflects on work, faith, family, and the core values he’s held on to, from his humble Christian upbringing through his enormous success running one of the world’s largest businesses.

Few people embody the American entrepreneurial spirit as plainly as Rich DeVos. A prominent businessman, self-made billionaire, philanthropist, worldwide speaker, bestselling author, family man, and devout Christian, DeVos not only helped create Amway, one of the world’s biggest companies, but he did it from the ground up with his deep faith in God guiding the way and keeping his hopes alive. Now after the success of his bestselling books in business, DeVos reveals his personal story.

Born to poor Dutch immigrants in rural Michigan during the Depression, DeVos learned about the importance of leadership and partnership. His grandfather, father, and teachers taught him valuable lessons and key principles about faith, optimism, and perseverance that would guide his entire life. In high school, he befriended Jay Van Andel, who later became his business partner. Together, they created a whole new way to sell products and established one of the largest, most successful companies in the world. DeVos also talks about his marriage and family, his experiences as a motivational speaker, his ownership of the NBA basketball team Orlando Magic, and his philanthropic, religious, and political endeavors.

Inspiring, fascinating, and full of heart, Simply Rich: Life and Lessons from the Cofounder of Amway is the astonishing rags-to-riches story that few can tell. Through his amazing accomplishments as both a businessman and generous soul, DeVos reveals the true meaning of success and how his deep faith helped him become a true American icon.
Published: Howard Books on
ISBN: 9781476751788
List price: $11.99
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