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From the Publisher

This work offers a summary of the book "A STAKE IN THE OUTCOME: Building a Culture of Ownership for the LongTerm Success of Your Business" by Jack Stack and Bo Burlingham

Jack Stack is president and CEO of SRC Holdings Corporation (formerly Springfield ReManufacturing Corporation), an employee owned company since 1982. Bo Burlingham is editoratlarge of Inc. Magazine.

According to Stack and Burlingham, "to succeed in creating an employeeowned and operated company, employees have to be taught how to think and act like owners". A Stake in the Outcome advises business managers to go beyond the traditional ways of rewarding employees, and teaches them how to build a sustainable ownership culture which provides employees with the right tools and attitude to carry out their responsibilities with the goals of the wider company at heart.

This guide outlines 14 Rules of Employee Ownership, and systematically addresses each point often illustrated with examples. At the end of this summary you should have a clearer understanding of how to empower your employees with the trust and intelligence they need in order to act in the company's best interests, without necessarily handing out company shares.

Published: Must Read Summaries on
ISBN: 9782806235039
List price: $7.99
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