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Toronto

Island Pilots Association


Vision for General Aviation


Inclusive, Integrated, Sustainable and Thriving
at the Toronto Island Airport


For discussion and further development
Respectfully Offered to the City of Toronto by
Toronto Island Pilots Association (TIPA); Executive Working Group
Updated: January 2, 2015

Toronto Island Pilots Association


Vision for General Aviation at Toronto Island Airport

Executive Summary ........................................................................................................................ 3
How should the Toronto Island Airport fit into the Toronto of the future? ............................... 3
Introduction .................................................................................................................................... 5
The Desired Future State for General Aviation at the Island Airport ............................................ 6
Towards a Vibrant and Sustainable Airport .................................................................................... 6
Harmonizing Authentic Collaboration with Key Planning Initiatives .............................................. 7
A Closer Look at General Aviation .................................................................................................. 9
What GA really is and what it really means to a community like Toronto ................................. 9
Contributing to the economic benefits a community airport generates .................................. 12
A comparative scan of two similar airports .............................................................................. 13
More GA potential - other GA revenue opportunities .............................................................. 14
An Integrated Solution Towards Sustainability ............................................................................ 15
Goals to Achieve the Vision ...................................................................................................... 15
TIPAs Declaration of Commitment .............................................................................................. 16
Appendix A: General Aviation at Toronto Island Airport .............................................................. 17
Appendix B: Proposed Sites Supporting General Aviation at Toronto Island Airport ................... 18





Copyright 2015 Toronto Island Pilots Association (TIPA)
125-720 King St. West, Box 212 | Toronto | ON |M5V 2T3
@tipacytz | tipa.ca | tipa@runway.ca

Executive Summary
How should the Toronto Island Airport fit into the Toronto of the future?

Toronto - a city that will soon host the worlds third largest
international multi-sport Games; the Pan Am and Parapan Am
Games; a city that is one of North Americas leading centres of
film and TV production; the third largest financial centre in
North America; and a city consistently ranked one of the most
liveable cities in the world with an attractive waterfront that
serves the needs of many. This balanced waterfront boasts the
Island Airport with its two critical elements of aviation; General
Aviation (GA) and Scheduled Commercial Air Services (SCAS).
SCAS is now popular for moving many people in and out of the
city, but less understood is what GA does how does it fit in?
TIPA is pleased that it has been approached to offer its vision for
consideration, allowing the City to better understand and
appreciate GA and its unique role.

TIPA GA VISION:
General Aviation is a thriving
part of an inclusive and
integrated Island Airport
community enabled by
coordinated efforts towards a
vibrant and sustainable
airport.


General Aviation represents the largest sector of aviation in Canada by far with a diverse
range of over twenty various forms of businesses and services that provide social and economic
benefits. Wiser decisions will come from a better understanding and assessment of GA and its
merits as part of a truly sustainable airport. The reality is that unsustainable practices, such as
limiting the growth of small diverse operations, may be much more harmful than perceived
given that large airlines go bankrupt all too routinely. In other words, sustainability must be top
of mind and built into the governance of the Toronto Island Airports future to ensure that the
right plans and strong community stewardship guide operations responsibly.

With the imminent closure of Buttonville Airport, Toronto Island is the only airport capable of
serving the Citys GA needs. GA is a growth sector and it provides a stable and responsible form
of needed aviation while demonstrating sustainable practices and a community fit. GA offers
so many services that go unseen, but that are collectively very significant elements of a healthy
airport (e.g. public safety/policing, tourism, disaster relief, education, public benefit flying,
medical flights, media, business travel, airport services, aviation businesses, aviation charters,
personal aviation etc.) In fact, its presence and balance was so significant, it was entrenched in
the Tripartite Agreement.





Copyright 2015 Toronto Island Pilots Association (TIPA)
125-720 King St. West, Box 212 | Toronto | ON |M5V 2T3
@tipacytz | tipa.ca | tipa@runway.ca



TIPA believes the public and all users wishing to make the most of the Toronto Island Airports
social and economic benefits should be able to do so. TIPA further advocates that it is also very
possible to do so in an integrated and inclusive manner providing those managing the airport
govern responsibly and are mindful of the environmental impacts of aviation. The very last
thing pilots and aviation business colleagues and service providers want - is no airport.

Therefore TIPA is committed to realizing its vision and advancing its mandate to help GA thrive
as part of a vibrant and sustainable aviation community. To do so it intends to be a champion
for GA as an active participant in all pertinent planning processes and help foster integration
and balance by seeking value-added partnerships and engaging in positive outreach and
education.

What TIPA asks for and envisions is support to allow the diverse GA-rich potential that currently
exists, to flourish and be realized through coordinated efforts at the Island Airport to promote:

A range of on-site operations integrated to cater to the unique needs of the executive
business traveler, tourists, local residents and the business and recreational aviation
community.
Enhanced tourism related GA entities (e.g. historic air museum, heli-tours, sight-seeing,
static displays, airshow, lakefront exhibits special/community GA events)
Increased public benefit GA (e.g. private/volunteer medical flights, animal rescues,
volunteer search & rescue, youth orientation flights, disaster relief capacity)
Public safety GA flight services (e.g. medevac, policing, emergency services)
Fuel vendor options (i.e. for local and itinerant GA traffic)
Aviation business opportunities (e.g. new low level hangars, maintenance, aircraft
servicing, enhanced docking facilities attracting float plane aircraft to the City)
Educational components (e.g. flight training for future growth job sector, safety training,
high-school co-op programs)
GA hangar facilities and tie downs for local and traveling GA traffic anticipated to
increase
Increased GA interaction with other business sectors of Toronto e.g.: the Film industry,
cartographers, resource development and First Nations needs and opportunities etc.

TIPA believes the same commitment to sustainability, diversity, integration and inclusiveness
that makes Toronto what it is provides the ingredients for a successful future City Airport.





Copyright 2015 Toronto Island Pilots Association (TIPA)
125-720 King St. West, Box 212 | Toronto | ON |M5V 2T3
@tipacytz | tipa.ca | tipa@runway.ca

Introduction

The City of Toronto approached the Toronto Island Pilots Association (TIPA) asking what our
Vision for General Aviation (GA) at Billy Bishop Toronto City Airport (commonly called the
Toronto Island Airport) would be. This document was developed by a TIPA Working Group that
represents pilots, businesses and aircraft owners, to provide a response to that question.

This paper should be viewed as a work-in-progress aimed to provide initial discussion points as
part of a collaborative solution-based process. TIPA advocates that inclusiveness and balance
will be of the utmost importance in attaining the desired state. As such, this discussion paper is
an interim deliverable. It is part of a broader Environmental Assessment, and should also inform
the Island Airports Master Plan process.

The Toronto Island Airport operates under a Tripartite Agreement that was struck in 1983
among the City of Toronto, the Toronto Port Authority and the Federal Government. These
three parties govern the airport under this framework that fosters balance between the various
uses and stakeholders. To its credit, the Toronto City Council has made it clear to the other two
parties that there is an expectation to govern and protect General Aviation in accordance with
this agreement. TIPA applauds this position and the Citys interest to receive input and
information to inform better decisions as part of planning processes underway. Ensuring
proper stewardship requires good management of the Toronto Island Airport and an ongoing
balance to maximize the benefits to the public and the City of Toronto.

TIPA believes this paper is an excellent start to making the City more aware of why the planning
to date has not reflected accurate or fulsome information relating to GAs important past,
current and significant role for a sustainable Island Airport.

This is not a just what we want report but rather a holistic what is needed message. This
report outlines TIPAs level of commitment and articulates a vision of how GA can fit into a
robust and diverse model that will best anchor the sustainability of the airport and benefit the
City and public in general in a desired future state.





Copyright 2015 Toronto Island Pilots Association (TIPA)
125-720 King St. West, Box 212 | Toronto | ON |M5V 2T3
@tipacytz | tipa.ca | tipa@runway.ca

The Desired Future State for General Aviation


at the Island Airport
TIPA was asked to provide what its GA vision would be for the
Toronto Island Airport. It is important to stress that TIPA
believes that a shared vision would enable all affected parties to
work more productively towards a desired future state and be
part of an inclusive and integrated Island Airport community
enabled by coordinated efforts towards a vibrant and
sustainable airport. With over 100 organizations reportedly
interested in providing input into future development plans, the
broader Island community, including GA, will not be well-served
by multiple competing silos, or divergent visions. Therefore,
step one should be creating and agreeing on one vision that is
inclusive, integrated and sustainable. TIPA believes this is the
way forward - to nurture a vibrant best-in-class all-inclusive
aviation community that can thrive and grow. In this scenario
TIPA sees its mandate as champions for GA as part of a broader
diverse airport community. Therefore the focus of this
discussion paper is to offer awareness and knowledge on how
GA might contribute to this desired state in a meaningful way.

a sustainable airport
balances the environmental,
economic, and social wellbeing of the community for
today and tomorrow... GA has
much to contribute towards
creating an inclusive,
integrated solution.

Towards a Vibrant and Sustainable Airport


Airports in general serve communities in a multitude of ways.
As part of the critical infrastructure tied to the largest city in
Canada, the operation of the Island Airport affects many people
who rely on its services. These services stretch far beyond
commercially scheduled airlines to include a diverse range of GA
services.
The Greater Toronto Area is one of the fastest growing areas in
North America and will have an estimated population of 13.5
million by 2041 (grown from 8.7 million in 2011). Consequently,





Copyright 2015 Toronto Island Pilots Association (TIPA)
125-720 King St. West, Box 212 | Toronto | ON |M5V 2T3
@tipacytz | tipa.ca | tipa@runway.ca

Stewardship of an airport
must consider and balance
the contribution and impact
of all operations collectively.


decisions that shape its future are deserving of very careful consideration by those empowered
to plan for its sustainability.
Sustainable development, although well-researched, is a complex subject. In simple terms, a
sustainable airport is one that is managed in a responsible and balanced manner so a desirable
present and future state for people can be realized. This is based on the concept of a system
whereby needs and limitations interact over a period of time. When you think of an airport as
such a holistic system, you begin to understand how an operation today can have a significant
impact on another part of the system, or the broader community - tomorrow. Stewardship of
an airport must consider and balance the contribution and impact of all operations collectively.
People (e.g. residents/city neighbours, pilots, passengers, employees/employers) all interact
within a particular built and natural environment and must effectively co-exist as one whole
community.

TIPA believes that a sustainable airport is one that adds value to peoples lives in a manner that
balances the environmental, economic, and social well-being of the community for today and
tomorrow. Good management is the key to ensuring the Island Airport has a diverse, healthy
and meaningful future. As such, TIPA sees a responsibility to maintain the airport in a manner
that ensures future generations can enjoy the same environment that is experienced today.

TIPA believes that balance can be achieved and maintained and that GA has much to contribute
towards creating an inclusive, integrated and sustainable solution.

Harmonizing Authentic Collaboration with


Key Planning Initiatives
The Island Airport has a colourful history of complex and often
contentious planning initiatives. If one steps back to reflect on
this, it might seem obvious that for a coordinated vision to be
created and succeed, all parties would have to first agree - but is
that realistic, or is it simply too great of a challenge? TIPA
believes that the current planning process offers an opportunity
to inform future plans and harmonize numerous activities that





Copyright 2015 Toronto Island Pilots Association (TIPA)
125-720 King St. West, Box 212 | Toronto | ON |M5V 2T3
@tipacytz | tipa.ca | tipa@runway.ca

The envisioned GAs future


state embraces an
opportunity for authentic
collaboration leading to
more empowered decisions
by an inclusive and
integrated Island Airport
community.


could bolster the diversity of the airport. The envisioned GA future state embraces an
opportunity for authentic collaboration, leading to more empowered decisions by an inclusive
and integrated Island Airport community.
Communities are not static; they change and require flexibility and adaptability. For this
reason, TIPA suggests the engagement process for collaboration must be dynamic and ongoing.
The City of Toronto and all of the elements of the community in and around the island
(residents, seasonal users, aviation and business communities) continue to be engaged in
various overlapping planning components associated with the island airport (e.g. a non-
statutory E.A., development of an Airport Master Plan, proposal for runway extensions, traffic
studies) whether its due to a geographic proximity, a special interest, or any situation with
respect to issues that may affect their well-being. TIPA suggests engagement for planning has
been done in a fractured manner and has led to the development of silos and the
entrenchment of positions that may not be benefiting the airport as a whole community. It is
time to stop thinking in black or white, win or lose terms, and time to re-focus on the many
unique aspects of the Island that can co-exist harmoniously; most if not all can co-exist as value-
added.
The EA Engagement Strategy (as led by Swerhun Facilitation) seemingly embraces
collaboration. It suggests, at minimum, twelve sectors in addition to aviation (e.g. Film, Youth,
Public Health, Tourism, Urban design/city building etc.) as participants in their EA process.
New and enhanced provincial planning policies (e.g. provincial policy framework) advocate
healthy and sustainable communities that support coordinated transportation connectivity
designs and mixed-use areas as catalysts in building vibrant communities that attract
businesses, visitors and residents.
TIPA feels that the previously presented Master Plan for the airport could have benefited from
more authentic collaboration with GA. It did not represent GA in any fulsome or accurate
manner that would allow for informed community decisions to be made. It assumes Scheduled
Commercial Air Service as the best use of aviation activity at the airport. It contains inaccuracies
or omissions that remain unchanged despite being raised by GA. TIPA would advocate caution
when using the term baseline data in referring to the existing Master Plan, as existing
materials can be misleading and misrepresent GA, or worse, overlook GA altogether. TIPA is
eager to be engaged in a consistent and ongoing manner. TIPA welcomes the opportunity to
share accurate information and raise awareness of the many positive aspects that GA currently
brings to this airport community, as well as the potential for further contributions.





Copyright 2015 Toronto Island Pilots Association (TIPA)
125-720 King St. West, Box 212 | Toronto | ON |M5V 2T3
@tipacytz | tipa.ca | tipa@runway.ca

A Closer Look at General Aviation


What GA really is and what it really means to a community like Toronto
The GA community in Canada is approximately 60,000 pilots
strong. Representing the largest sector of aviation, GA is
defined by international and Canadian authorities as all activity
other than scheduled airline service and the military. In other
words, everything other than scheduled passenger airline
flights, or the occasional military flight, would be included in GA
at the Toronto Island Airport. As such, it represents a wide
variety of diverse activities and operations that contribute to
the community on a local, regional, provincial, national and
international level.

90% of all Canadian


aircraft are GA - serving as
an important mode of
transportation and
business tool servicing
areas of aviation that
airlines do not.

To provide a sense of GAs significance as the largest fleet of


aircraft in Canada, out of the almost 36,000 aircraft in this country, only about 1,500 are
airliner-size (i.e. over 5,700kg commercially registered aircraft). More than ninety percent of
all aircraft are smaller, private and commercial aircraft that conduct non-airline activities. It is
also relevant to note that the GA remains a sector of growth. Ontario has about 18,000 pilots
currently licensed, with the majority near Toronto. There are over 10,000 aircraft registered in
Ontario and almost 4,000 in the M and L postal codes alone. Additionally, over 1,200 of
those are registered in Toronto proper, or near the suburbs (i.e. Mississauga, Markham,
Concord, etc.).
Although less quantifiable, GA also brings economic and intrinsic value to communities and
cities such as Toronto. GA is not simply private hobbyist aviators contrary to the
description offered to the City by the Toronto Port Authority during previous consultations. In
fact, GA serves as an important mode of transportation and business tool, servicing areas of
aviation that airlines do not. Using private aircraft for business is no different than our areas
highways and vehicles that move people and get business done. To support this, GA also
requires the necessary facilities and services to train new pilots, certify and upgrade existing
pilots, as well as to maintain and provide support to the many aircraft required by the broader
GA sector.





Copyright 2015 Toronto Island Pilots Association (TIPA)
125-720 King St. West, Box 212 | Toronto | ON |M5V 2T3
@tipacytz | tipa.ca | tipa@runway.ca


Equally difficult to quantify is the very strong (but often
overlooked) linkage between important social community
services and GA. For GA not only provides the regulated public
safety flying such as Medevac and policing, but more and
more research is revealing the essential (yet often not realized
in planning phases) asset a city airport and its GA community
is in a disaster response. The City of Torontos GA played a
vital role in a historical GA response during the Great Ice
Storm of 1998 that left 3.6 million people without power
after six days of freezing rain. Only GA aircraft were available
and could navigate necessary local runways. So 30 GA aircraft
flew much needed supplies between Toronto and St. Jean,
Quebec. Emergency response and disaster relief using GA
provides transportation options for supplies of food, medicine,
as well as key personnel (e.g., disaster specialists and
volunteers, elected officials, communication experts, and
media). The value of GA in other jurisdictions has been
proven successful in almost all major disaster events such as
9/11, the 2004 Tsunami, the Haiti earthquake, and Hurricanes
Gustav, Katrina, and Sandy.

Torontos GA played a
vital role in a historical
emergency response during
the Great Ice Storm of
1998.

Similarly, there is a host of humanitarian based volunteer services (i.e. public benefit flying) that
provides unique valued services to a City such as Toronto. Organizations such as Hope Air
routinely use Toronto Island Airport as part of the GA community. Hope Air is a registered,
national charity that provides free air transportation (i.e., flights) to low income Canadians who
are in financial need and must travel to meet healthcare obligations. Hope Air targets a specific
vulnerable population (i.e., all ages of Canadians with a wide variety of health related issues) to
provide no-cost flights that reduce financial, physical and emotional stress on families dealing
with health related scenarios, making specialized medical care more accessible to all Canadians.
Another such organization is Pilots N Paws Canada, a not-for-profit organization that operates
as a registered charitable foundation with a mandate to move at risk animals from areas
where they are threatened (e.g., in over-burdened shelters, animal abuse situations, or medical
emergencies). PNPC have worked closely with rescue agencies and Toronto Animal Services in
recent times.

10





Copyright 2015 Toronto Island Pilots Association (TIPA)
125-720 King St. West, Box 212 | Toronto | ON |M5V 2T3
@tipacytz | tipa.ca | tipa@runway.ca


TIPA has bundled GA at Toronto Island into six generalized categories; flying done for public
safety, public benefit flying, city/tourism related aviation, business oriented, related airport
services, and private aviation. All of these are further detailed in the table that follows. A more
detailed listing of actual GA businesses, groups and related services that currently exist at or
use the Island Airport can be found in Appendix A.

Public Safety
& Protection

11

City Profile /
Tourism

Public
Benefit

Business
Oriented

Airport
Services

Private
Aviation

Medevac

Airshow

Humanitarian

Charters

Control Tower

Personal Use
(Recreational)

Policing

Tourism

Civil Search &


Rescue

Aircraft Sales

Parking

Emergency
Response

Volunteer
Health Flights

Corporate
Owned

Customs,
Immigration and
Passenger
Screening

Disaster Relief

Animal Welfare
Flights

Business Use
(Privately
Owned)

Youth
Introductory
Flights

Flight Training

FBO Services

Aircraft
Maintenance

and Refurbishing

Air Surveys

News/Media





Copyright 2015 Toronto Island Pilots Association (TIPA)
125-720 King St. West, Box 212 | Toronto | ON |M5V 2T3
@tipacytz | tipa.ca | tipa@runway.ca

Contributing to the economic benefits a community airport generates


GA typically generates significant economic benefits for communities. There have been a
multitude of economic studies done by qualified economists to definitively establish formulas
that can be applied to value various segments of the economy such as airport economic
estimates. Based on such a formula in a cursory calculation using very conservative calculations
and existing available data, TIPA determined the total economic value to the community
stemming from the existing GA sector at Toronto Island would easily exceed $20 million per
year.
While not meant to be conclusive, these TIPAs exploratory
findings reinforce other very credible Economic Impact Studies
that show the value stemming from GA to a local community
is greater than typically perceived by the general public and
local governments. In fact, in case after case, local airports
have shown they help to drive revenue into the local economy
via avenues that are not readily considered by planners. GA is
often inaccurately linked to an image of the rich and few who
fly for recreation - an image that does not represent a true or
accurate reality of GA.

12





Copyright 2015 Toronto Island Pilots Association (TIPA)
125-720 King St. West, Box 212 | Toronto | ON |M5V 2T3
@tipacytz | tipa.ca | tipa@runway.ca

the value stemming from


GA to a local community is
greater than typically
perceived by the general
public and local
governments

A comparative scan of two similar airports


To get a sense for GAs operations and its untapped potential, it is useful to look at GA within a
couple of lakefront airports that have similarities to the Toronto Island Airport and successfully
have a healthy and integrated aviation community. TIPA took a closer look at two such airports
and offers the following key facts about the Cleveland Lakefront Airport (KBKL) and New
Orleans Lakefront Airport (KNEW).
KBKL - Cleveland Lakefront Airport is strictly a GA airport, meaning that there are no scheduled
commercial services. The GA and GA-related tenants at KBKL include: 4 flight schools, 1 FBO, 1
aircraft charter company, 1 cargo charter company, 1 Police Department Aviation Unit, 1
aircraft charter/medevac/aircraft sales-management company, 1 limousine service company, 1
air show specialist, the International Womens Aviation and Space Museum, a wildlife control
biologist, and the Air Traffic control and weather services, firefighting and rescue services. Non-
GA related tenants include departments of the City Police and Fire service and
tech/engineering/construction companies. The airport operations are strongly supported by
the Mayor as an integral part of the Cleveland airport systems. With a total of 72 aircraft based
there (including 8 jets and 13 helicopters) the airport also serves as the reliever airport for
Hopkins, Clevelands international airport. Overall the Cleveland Lakefront Airport is seen as
the most convenient and efficient way to access businesses, tourist attractions, sports charters
and medical facilities in the area.
KNEW - New Orleans Lakefront Airport was a GA-only airport from 1946 to 2013, when one
carrier began offering regional passenger service. Of significant interest was the critical role
this airport served in post-Katrina rescues of citizens. With 112 aircraft based there (including 9
jets and 3 helicopters) it is a reliever airport for Louis Armstrong International airport and is
seen as an economic engine for the southeast Louisiana region and the City.

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Copyright 2015 Toronto Island Pilots Association (TIPA)
125-720 King St. West, Box 212 | Toronto | ON |M5V 2T3
@tipacytz | tipa.ca | tipa@runway.ca

More GA potential - other GA revenue opportunities


A self-sustaining Flying Club is another interesting and sound case that is well-suited to a GA-
friendly airport and could be considered as part of several specialized service centres that
would accommodate a variety of current and future GA user's needs and strategically
integrated into the airport community.
Low-level hangar and tie downs for approximately 100 GA aircraft could generate upwards of
$600,000.00/year and be developed in conjunction with a flying club or otherwise. With the
closure or limitation of other nearby airports, there is growing demand for hangar / tie-down
space that will only increase. For example, there are nearly 200 planes at Buttonville and no
other airfields within reasonable driving distance; options become Oshawa, Burlington, or
Brampton, with the last two facing local building/development challenges on flight paths that
threaten their long-term existence.
Toronto Aviation Museum housed within old Terminal Building in conjunction with City
Archives and other resources (all accessible from the south side of the Island).
Eatery within the old Terminal Building (accessible from south side of the airfield), could be
utilized by the public, Island residents, tourists and club pilots.
Other hangar and rental space for aviation-related businesses.
New innovations should also be within the scope of the airport development, such as new
technology potential for revenue generation.

14





Copyright 2015 Toronto Island Pilots Association (TIPA)
125-720 King St. West, Box 212 | Toronto | ON |M5V 2T3
@tipacytz | tipa.ca | tipa@runway.ca

An Integrated Solution Towards Sustainability


Goals to Achieve the Vision

To realize the desired future state and achieve this vision - TIPA sees:

15

Several specialized FBO type service centres that would accommodate a variety of
current and future GA user's needs (e.g. a local flying club with a community meeting
space, a GA business centre for itinerant executive use, tourist and commercially
focused GA, a centre catering to float plane services). These would be strategically
integrated into the airport layout with potential on both the north and south sides of
the field to maximize interactions with other parts of the airport community. They
would be managed by private enterprises and logically separated on the airport
grounds. (See Appendix B for an example of a possible configuration for this and several
following concepts).
Tie downs for an increased number of small private aircraft, local and itinerant.
Three to six additional low-level hangars to house private and small commercial aircraft.
Some would be situated at the south end of the field. This could free up heated hangar
space to encourage establishment of GA related businesses, large and small.
Safe docking facilities for 8 float planes at the east end of the Island. Four mooring
balls for float planes to the east. Safe and appropriately designed ramp for float planes.
Safe and modern launching and beaching facilities and equipment for float planes.
Increased organized volunteer public benefit GA (e.g. private/volunteer medical flights
such as Hope Air, animal rescues such as Pilots-n-Paws, disaster relief capacity)
Enhanced public safety/service GA businesses (e.g. medevac, policing, emergency
services)
Support/maintenance facilities that keep local dollars local rather than private owners
having aircraft maintenance performed in remote locations.
Competitive fuel, oil, and other pricing that come from having several sources.
Flight Training facilities that will meet the needs of Torontos future commercial pilots.
Continued safety training facilities for those aviation enthusiasts flying private aircraft.
Keeping local dollars local
A local public aviation attraction, such as an Air Museum, to promote local aviation
history (old terminal building) as part of the public face of aviation in Toronto.
GA interaction with other business sectors of Toronto i.e.: the Film industry,
cartographers & other air survey users, resource development and First Nations needs &
opportunities etc.
Aviation services thatpromote tourism such as fly-ins (pilots from non-local flying
clubs).
TIPA/GA support for local special events (e.g. air show, lakefront exhibits/events)





Copyright 2015 Toronto Island Pilots Association (TIPA)
125-720 King St. West, Box 212 | Toronto | ON |M5V 2T3
@tipacytz | tipa.ca | tipa@runway.ca

A local charter for GA Search & Rescue being established (i.e. CASARA).
Public interaction with pilots. Public eatery, under private ownership, in the old
terminal building at which the public can mix and mingle with private pilots. Entrance
would be via the city park system and Hanlans Ferry.
Opportunities to showcase GA through public campaigns such as Show n Fly (static
ramp tours, community GA events).
Youth awareness and career interest programs (e.g. COPA for Kids and local high-school
co-op programs) to share the experience of flight and to create awareness of Torontos
aviation heritage programs and opportunities. Programs such as this provide an
opportunity for the flying community to give back to the community.
Consideration of GA aircraft safety in design of advanced aviation facilities such as
instrument approaches.

TIPAs Declaration of Commitment



TIPA is committed to realizing its vision and advancing its mandate to help GA thrive as part of a
vibrant and sustainable aviation community and is therefore committed to:

Championing GA on behalf of its membership and for the benefit of GA and the City.
Actively participating in an advisory capacity as it relates to GA.
Continuing advocacy for an integrated inclusive airport community.
Assisting in reviewing and considering all concepts, proposals or concerns from the City
and all other Toronto Waterfront stakeholders and providing a balanced perspective
based on North American aviation trends and experiences.
Helping to seek partnerships that will generate potential revenue through GA avenues.
Working to maintain high levels of participation in GA at the Island.
Continued outreach and education relating to GA.

16





Copyright 2015 Toronto Island Pilots Association (TIPA)
125-720 King St. West, Box 212 | Toronto | ON |M5V 2T3
@tipacytz | tipa.ca | tipa@runway.ca

Appendix A: General Aviation at Toronto Island Airport


Public Safety &
Protection
- ORNGE Air
Ambulance
- Other air
ambulance

City Profile /
Tourism
- Canadian
International
Airshow
- Toronto
International
Film Festival
charters
- The Helicopter
Company air
tours and
charters

Public
Benefit
- Hope Air
- Pilots-n
Paws


17





Copyright 2015 Toronto Island Pilots Association (TIPA)
125-720 King St. West, Box 212 | Toronto | ON |M5V 2T3
@tipacytz | tipa.ca | tipa@runway.ca

Business
Oriented

Airport
Services

- Trans Capital Air


refurbishing,
charters and FBO
- Island Air Flight
School and
Charters
- Cameron Air
charters
- Airborne Sensing
aerial photography
- National Heritage
Brands specialized
retailer
- Porter FBO
- Eagle Aircraft
maintenance
- J A Spears aircraft
sales
- Presidential Air
charters
- Air Georgian
charters
- Flightexec charters
- Private Air charters
- DB Air charters

- NAV Canada
control
tower
- CATSA
baggage
screening
services
- Canadian
Border
Services
Agency
customs and
immigration
- G4S security
services
- Stolport
parking

Private Aviation
- Various
owners of
light aircraft
including float
planes

Appendix B: Proposed Sites Supporting General Aviation at


Toronto Island Airport

Appendix B:
Proposed Sites Supporting General Aviation
at Toronto Island Airport