SwiftKey Emoji Report 
Part Two - June 2015 
  
 
1.5 BILLION EMOJI 
In April of 2015, SwiftKey analyzed more than a billion pieces of emoji data to learn how speakers 
of different languages use emoji. According to  The Atlantic , SwiftKey has the biggest database of 
emoji in the world. In this report, we look at 15 new languages and an additional 500,000 emoji 
beyond the 16 languages previously analyzed in order to expand what we know about how this 
emerging image­based ‘language’ is being used all over the world. 
  
The new languages1 analyzed include: 
 

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.

Croatian 
Czech 
Danish 
Dutch 
Finnish 
French Canadian 
Greek 
Hinglish (English/Hindi hybrid) 

9. Hungarian 
10. Norwegian 
11. Portuguese 
12. Romanian 
13. Serbian 
14. Slovakian 
15. Swedish 

 
This report analyzes languages and language variants (eg French vs Canadian French) across 60 
emoji categories. The findings in this report came from an analysis of aggregate SwiftKey Cloud 
data over a four month period between October 2014 and January 2015, and includes both 
Android and iOS devices. 
 
 
Background on SwiftKey: 
SwiftKey Keyboard is the 'mind­reading' hit keyboard app for iPhone and Android known for 
learning and predicting your favorite words, phrases and emoji – sometimes with startling 
accuracy. SwiftKey users have saved nearly two trillion keystrokes and more than 23,000 years in 
combined typing time. Founded in London in 2008, SwiftKey's technology is now found on more 
than 250M devices worldwide. Learn more at  www.swiftkey.com . 
 
Media may reach the SwiftKey PR team at  press@swiftkey.com  
 
Download SwiftKey here: 

 
1

 

 based on languages enabled by users of the SwiftKey Keyboard app  

 

 
 

 
 
KEY FINDINGS: 
 
● Swedish speakers, whose homeland is famous for its crisp, soft and sweet breads, use the 
bread emoji (
) more than any other language 
● North Pole­dwelling Danish, Norwegian and Swedish speakers use the Santa emoji more 
than all other languages (Interestingly, their Finnish­speaking neighbors underindex for the 
Santa emoji, despite a Finland  town  claiming the title of Santa’s birthplace) 
● Finnish speakers use 8x more black moon emoji (
) than any other language (a nod to 
their long winter nights?)  
● Hinglish speakers lead the world in use of party emoji, as well as the ‘folded hands’ emoji (
: interpreted as either praying or clapping hands) 
● French­speaking Canadians are a perfect mix of French speakers and Canadian English 
speakers, falling right in the middle of the two languages’ use of hearts, happy faces and 
sad faces 
● Portuguese speakers (using the ‘Portuguese from Portugal’ language vs Brazilian 
Portuguese language model) overtake Australian English speakers in use of drugs emoji 
(pill, syringe, mushroom, cigarette) 
● Slovakian speakers replace Turkish as the #1 users of happy face emoji (the #1 emoji 
category worldwide) 
● The red heart emoji (
) is the #1 emoji for several Scandinavian and Eastern European 
languages. In the first report, the only language that had an emoji that is  not  a smiley face 
in the #1 spot was French. 
 

 
TABLE OF CONTENTS 
  
Section 1: Emoji use comparison charts - pages 3-7 
Section 2: Language-specific data: Scandinavia - pages 8-10 
Section 3: Language-specific data: Eastern Europe - pages 14-15 
Section 4: Language specific data: Various European languages - pages 14-15 
Section 3: Language-specific data: Other languages - page 16 
  
 
 
 

 
 

EMOJI USE COMPARISON CHARTS 
 
HOLIDAY 

 
 
DRUGS 

 

 
 

  
HAPPY FACES 

 
 
ANIMALS 

 
 
 

 
 

 
 
PARTY 

 
 
HEARTS 

 

 
 

 
FRANCE FRENCH vs CANADIAN FRENCH vs CANADIAN ENGLISH 

 
 
 
SPAIN VS PORTUGAL 

 
 
 

 
 

 
PORTUGAL PORTUGUESE VS BRAZILIAN PORTUGUESE 

 
 
(report continued below) 
 
 

 
 

 
LANGUAGE­SPECIFIC EMOJI DATA 
 
 
SCANDINAVIA 
  
Danish 

 
(cont. below) 
 
 
 

 
 

Finnish 

 
 
Norwegian 

 

 
 

Swedish 

 
(cont. below) 
 
 
 

10 

 
 

EASTERN EUROPE 
  
Croatian 

 
Czech 

 
11 

 
 

 
Hungarian 

 
Romanian 

 
12 

 
 

 
Slovakian 

 
Serbian 

 
13 

 
 

VARIOUS EUROPEAN LANGUAGES 
 
Greek 

 
Portuguese 

 
14 

 
 

 
Dutch 

 
(cont. below) 
 
 
 

15 

 
 

OTHER LANGUAGES 
 
Hinglish 

 
French Canadian 

 
16 

 
 

How this research was conducted 
These findings were taken from the SwiftKey Cloud database, which we occasionally analyze to 
identify aggregate, anonymized trends about how people use words ­ and emoji. This also helps 
make sure our predictions are as accurate and personalized as possible. You can learn more 
about our data and SwiftKey Cloud   here . 
 

17 

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful