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JOURNAL

C M Y K
Clarks Summit, Pa. JULY 18 TO JULY 24, 2012 50 www.theabingtonjournal.com
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An edition of The Times Leader
THE ABINGTON
Wilkes-Barre, Pa.
ArtsEtc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10
Calendar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2
Classified. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15
Crosswords. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4
Obituaries. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9
School. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6
Sports. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13
INSIDE
Check out the
community calendar on
Page 2 for upcoming
bazaars and festivals.
See additional photos
of the Dalton Fire
Company Carnival
on Page 3.
In the mood
for some fun?
Which
organization
benefited
from a
motorcycle
ride last
weekend?
See Page 12
for details.
Handle on helping
W
ho needs a veil when a coordinating helmet is
available? Bride Cyndi (Page) Roe rides off to
the wedding reception with her groom, Pastor
Don Roe, of Summit Baptist Bible Church, July 13.
For a complete photo story see www.theabingtonjour-
nal.com
ABINGTON JOURNAL/ELIZABETH BAUMEISTER
RIDE OF THEIR LIVES
C
larks Summit native Danielle Fleming, owner of Da-
nielle and Company, Scranton, said she is an entrepre-
neur at heart and loves launching newideas and prod-
ucts. Homemade and home
grown are adjectives that could de-
scribe her latest endeavor and hobby:
food swapping.
On July11, the Scranton Cultural
Center at The Masonic Temple hosted
the premier event of NEPASwappers (ANortheastern Pa.
Food Swapping Community). Fleming founded the group
in April 2012, and organized the event to give members of
the community an opportunity to exchange and converse,
and to celebrate and share homemade food in the region.
Its also about building a friendship and sharing a story,
said Fleming, whose interest in canning and preserving
homemade and home grown grewroots out of a family tradi-
tion and most recently, a summer spent in Princeton, N.J.
Last summer I was in Princeton, N.J., and there were
farmers market every day to go to. I started getting into
canning and preservingI canned years ago, but got
away fromit. I borrowed my moms canning pot that was
passed down to her by her mother, so it has lots of histo-
ry and that is all part of the canning/preserving move-
ment. There is an old school feel to it that I adore, said
Fleming. I started following Marisa McClellans blog
last summer and started cooking and canning up a
storm- preserving everything frompeaches and
pears to making my own ketchup and mus-
tard.
Throughout the world and in larger metro-
politan cities such as Philadelphia and Los
Angeles, food swapping events are held
Dreaming of
Dilly beans?
Inaugural food
swap unites
author, home
canners to
share edibles,
preserve
tradition.
Second event
planned for
fall.
See Swapping, Page 12
TOP RIGHT: Recent release
by food blogger, visiting
author Marisa McClellan.
BELOW: Clarks Summit
business owner Donna
Czarkowski swapped
samples of her
"Wedding Time
Tea" for items
such as simple
syrup, hum-
mus and an
Italian salad.
BY JOAN MEAD-MATSUI
Abington Journal Correspondent
I borrowed my moms canning
pot that was passed down to her
by her mother, so it has lots of
history I started preserving
everything from peaches and
pears to making my own ketchup
and mustard.
Clarks Summit native Danielle Fleming
Founded NEPA Swappers (A Northeastern Pa. Food Swapping
Community)
INSIDE: South
Abington Farmers
Market opens July
21, 12A
ABINGTON
JOURNAL/
JOAN
MEAD-
MATSUI
PHOTO COURTESY AL SEIB/LOS ANGELES TIMES/MCT
FACTORYVILLE- It
was announced at the
July 11 Factoryville Bor-
ough Council meeting
that a new traffic light
will be installed near
Keystone Collegeon
Route 6 and 11.
Council has the option
of installing an additional
red warning signal light.
Borough Manager Mary
Ellen Buckbee informed
the board that she re-
ceived a letter from
PennDOT stating that the
red warning signal will
be located on LaPlume
Township property and
that Township does not
feel it should pay for the
additional light.
The borough will own
and maintain the traffic
signal , but if we want
the red warning signal
we will have to pay for
it, because the neigh-
boring township has al-
ready said no to the pur-
chase, said Buckbee.
Board member Tom Da-
vis said, The light is
needed, but I dont feel
the red warning light
prior to the stop light is
needed.
After discussion, the
board agreed to send a
letter to PennDOT stating
that Factoryville Borough
will maintain the traffic
light but will not take on
cost of the red warning
signal light.
Traffic
light near
Keystone
approved
BY SUSAN REBENSKY
Abington Journal Correspondent
company advises.
Most of us thought the
Supreme Court would uphold
the decision, she said. Now,
most clients are in a wait- and
-see mode until after the elec-
tion.
The new health care law
prohibits insurance compa-
niesfrom dropping coverage
if subscribers get sick, billing
into bankruptcy because of an
annual or lifetime limit, or,
soon, discriminating against
anyone with a pre-existing
condition.
In this industry, the mess-
age to employers has been
pretty consistent since the
ACA was enacted dont
ignore it, said Wylam.
Still, we know that many
employers avoided the subject
in the hope that the law
would be dismantled or
struck down completely. Em-
ployers who chose this tact
need to allow the ruling to
serve as their wake up call to
make health care reform a
component of all strategic
business and benefits plan-
ning from this point forward.
People want simplicity,
Wylam said. They want to
know what coverage they
have and they want it at a
reasonable price.
According to a recent sur-
vey conducted by Parent-
ebeard, 67.6 percent of em-
ployers said the provisions of
the act may affect the types
of Health Coverage they offer
employees going forward,
while 23.69 percent indicated
no change to their benefits.
Vantagen is a wholly -owned
subsidiary of ParenteBeard
With cost pressures and
what looks like greater ad-
ministrative and compliance
burdens, all it will take is
success by a few early adap-
ters to start seeing this radical
change become more main-
CLARKS SUMMIT- On
March 23, 2010, President
Barack Obama signed the
Affordable Care Act. The law
puts in place comprehensive
health insurance reforms that
will roll out over four years
and beyond, with most chang-
es taking place by 2014.
There will be a big leap
from now to 2014, Kim Wy-
lam, President and Managing
Partner of Vantagen, an em-
ployee benefits administrator
based in Clarks Summit said.
If the act goes into writing,
businesses will have the deci-
sion whether to offer employ-
ees employer -sponsored
health care.
Wylam added that in some
cases, employers would spend
more money on employee
insurance costs than what the
penalties would be for not
offering coverage.
She believes the pay or
play concept will have the
biggest effect on business
owners. The concept pay or
play, requires employers to
either provide health insur-
ance coverage to employees
or pay a per employee penalty
for not offering such cov-
erage.
Wylam believes the up-
coming election will be crit-
ical to the life of this act.
If all Republicans are
elected, including the presi-
dent, I would say theres a 99
percent chance the whole bill
will be repealed and some-
thing else will come out of
it, she said.
According to Wylam, the
overall reaction to the passing
of the act has been luke-
warm among clients her
Bill presents
challenges
Affordable Care Act may force
employers to offer health
insurance or face penalties
BY ROBERT TOMKAVAGE
rtomkavage@theabingtonjournal.com
See bill, Page 12
James and Karen Arscott, of
Waverly, both physicians, have
a personal motivation for form-
ing and becoming co-directors
of the newPennsylvania Chap-
ter of the Lung Cancer Alli-
ance.
Karen is a lung cancer survi-
vor.
But she never smoked or was
exposed to secondhand smoke.
So when the couple learned she
had lung cancer, she said the
news left themsomewhat in
shock.
Although she did not know
much about the disease at the
time, she can nowlist the grim
statistics off the top of her head:
Lung cancer patients have
a14 to 21percent five-year
survival rate, a prognosis that
hasnt changed in 40 years.
The percentage of lung
cancer patients who currently
smoke is 20, those who already
quit smoking is 60 and those
who never smoked is 20.
160,000 people die of lung
cancer per year.
That would be like a jumbo
jet crashing every day, Arscott
said. And yet, it has the least
research and funding [com-
pared to other types of cancer].
Lung cancer, she said, is the
forgotten cancer.
She said she believes a major
reason for the lack of research
and funding is the stigma at-
tached to the disease, which
assumes if a person has lung
cancer, they must have done
something (like smoking) to
get it.
Arscott said not everyone
who has lung cancer developed
it because of smoking. But, she
said, even if smoking is the
reason, it doesnt mean the
person deserves to die. She said
while there is no doubt about
the connections between the
addiction and disease and al-
though shes always been op-
Lung cancer survivor:
Killer silent, forgotten
BY ELIZABETH BAUMEISTER
lbaumeister@theabingtonjournal.com
Co-directors of the new Pa.
Chapter of the Lung Cancer
Alliance, Karen Arscott and
James Arscott participate in a
Team Lung Love event for the
Lung Cancer Alliance. See Survivor, Page 12
My grandmother died from lung cancer. Did she
smoke? Yes. My sister has lung cancer. Does she
smoke? No, never did. Does that mean that my
grandmother deserved to die? No.
Sheila McDonough, of Olyphant
C M Y K
PAGE 2A www.theabingtonjournal.com The Abington JournalClarks Summit, PA WEDNESDAY, JULY18, 2012
YOUR COMMUNITY
211 S. State St., CLARKS SUMMIT, PA 18411 570-587-1148
NEWS@THEABINGTONJOURNAL.COM
EDITOR KRISTIE GRIER CERUTI
585-1604 / kgrier@theabingtonjournal.com
STAFF WRITERS AND PHOTOGRAPHERS
ELIZABETH BAUMEISTER
585-1606 / lbaumeister@theabingtonjournal.com
ROBERT TOMKAVAGE
585-1600 / rtomkavage@theabingtonjournal.com
RETAIL ADVERTISING ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES
JILL ANDES
578-9222 / jill.andes@timesleader.com
CLASSIFIED ADVISOR
LINDA BYRNES
970-7189 / lbyrnes@timesleader.com
COVERAGE AREA: The Abington Journal, a weekly community newspaper
that is part of Impressions Media in Wilkes-Barre, PA, covers the Abingtons
area of Lackawanna and Wyoming counties. This includes but is not limited to
Clarks Summit, Clarks Green, South Abington, Newton, Ransom, Glenburn,
Dalton, La Plume, Factoryville, Waverly, Tunkhannock and the Abington
Heights, Lackawanna Trail and Lakeland school districts.
Our circulation hovers between 2,000 and 3,000 readers. We try to get to as
many events as possible, but staff and space limitations make it impossible to
cover everything. If you have news about your family, town or organization,
please send it to us and well do our best to publish it. Photographs (with
captions) are welcome.
CORRECTIONS, clarifications: The Abington Journal will correct errors of
fact or clarify any misunderstandings created by a story. Call 587-1148. Have a
story idea? Please call. Wed like to hear about it. Letters: The Abington Journal
prints all letters, which have local interest. Send letters to: Editor, The Abington
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and include a phone number where we can reach the author. Editor reserves
the right to edit or reject any item submitted. Deadline is noon, Friday prior to
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CIRCULATION
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week. See box at right for subscription prices. Local subscriptions should arrive
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ton Journal (USPS 542-460), 211 S. State St., PO Box 277, Clarks Summit, PA
18411. Published weekly by Wilkes Barre Publishing Company, 211S. State St.,
Clarks Summit, PA, 18411. $20 per year, in Lackawanna and Wyoming counties
(PA); $24 elsewhere in PA and additional offices. Periodicals postage paid at
Clarks Summit, PA, 18411, and at additional offices.
ISSN. NO. 1931-8871, VOL. 86, ISSUE NO. 29
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Abington Journal, 211 South
State St., Clarks Summit, PA 18411.
COPYRIGHT 2012: Entire contents copyrighted. All rights reserved. No
part of this publication may be reproduced by any means without the express
written consent of the publisher.
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Return completed formwith payment to: The Abington Journal, 211S. State St.,
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THE ABINGTON
JOURNAL
The Clarks Summit United Methodist Church will hold its Chicken Barbecue July 21 from
11a.m. to 5 p.m. rain or shine. The cost is $10 for adults and $5 for children 12 and under. The
dinner includes chicken for adults and for children, baked potato with butter and sour
cream, baked beans, dinner roll, brownie, and ice tea or lemonade (eat-in only).
Shown, from left, seated, are Steve Young, Marc Altier, Amy Flory. Standing are: Lisa Akulo-
nis, George Akulonis, Dan Miller, Even Miller.
Chicken barbecue
set for July 21
CLASS REUNIONS
Abington Heights Class of 1982
will host its 30th Class Reunion
Aug. 11, 5 -11 p.m. at Camelot
Restaurant & Inn. Tickets are $35.
For details, contact
ahhs82@groups.facebook.com.
During the reunion, the class will
hold a fundraiser to benefit Liberty
Reins Ranch, an Equestrian Center
and co-educational program that
provides services for disabled veter-
ans and their immediate family
members living in Pa. The ranch,
which operates solely on donations,
was founded by Deborah Basalyga,
a 1982 Abington Heights graduate
who currently serves as its executive
director.
REMINDERS
Luzerne County Community
College will offer credit courses for
the fall semester in Pittston and Old
Forge. Registration will be held at
Pittston Area Middle School August
6, from 5:30 - 7:30 p.m. Regis-
tration will be held at Old Forge
High School August 8, from 5:30 to
7:30 p.m. Courses scheduled to be
offered in Pittston include Algebra,
History, CPR, Psychology, and
Sociology. English is scheduled for
Old Forge. Classes for the fall se-
mester will begin August 27 and
end December 7. Info:
800.377.LCCC, ext. 3826 or
lhahn@luzerne.edu.
LHV will run the Seventh Annual
Heritage Explorer Train to the City
of Carbondale for the Ethnic Heri-
tage Festival on Saturday, August 18.
Tickets are available at all Lacka-
wanna County libraries now through
August 17. Seating is limited.
Marleys Mission is requesting
votes for its president Gene Talerico
as Volunteer of the Year, voting ends
July 26. Step-by-Step Instructions:
Go to http://www.stayclassy.org/
classy-awards/weekend. Click on
Vote. Click on East. scroll down
until you see Volunteer Of The
Year. Click on Select for Gene
Talerico. Look towards the bottom
right of the screen and click Sub-
mit My Final Ballot. Next you will
be prompted to log in with your
Facebook account. Click Connect
Using Facebook. Your vote does
not count until you do this final
step.
Clarks Green Borough encourag-
es residents to apply for vacant
council position. Interested individu-
als should e mail a cover letter and
resume toinfo@clarksgreen.orgor
drop them off at the Borough Build-
ing by August 3.
CHILDREN AND TEEN SUM-
MER CAMPS
Comm Camp, at The Waverly
Community House, 1115 North
Abington Road, Waverly, from 9
a.m. - 1 p.m. Weekdays, through
August 3. For Pre-K through Grade
seven. Info: www.waverlycomm.org
or 586.8191, ext. 2.
SKY Vacation Bible School,
July 23 27 from 5:45 8:30 p.m.
at Clarks Summit United Methodist
Church, 1310 Morgan Highway,
Clarks Summit. Closing at 10 a.m.
July 29. For Ages two through
completion of sixth grade. Cost:
Free. Register: www.bigbibleschool-
.com. Info: 587.2571
Harmony Heart Camp Day
Camp, at the camp, 1557 Heart Lake
Rd, Scott Twp, July 30 - August 3
from 9 a.m. 5:30 p.m. For ages 7 -
12. Activities include: swimming,
soccer, archery, boating, basketball,
crafts, fishing, volleyball, nature
study and more. Cost: $120 (family
discount available). Info: 254.6272.
DAILY EVENTS
July 18: Chicken-n-Biscuit or
Ham Dinner, at Clifford United
Methodist Church from 4 - 6 p.m.
Take out or dine in. Includes dinner,
dessert and drink. Cost: $7.95.
A Cabaret-style Evening of Enter-
tainment, in the Gathering Room at
Our Lady of Snows Church at 7
p.m. Music, song and comedy will
be offered while the audience enjoys
hors doeuvres, desserts, wine and
punch. A free will offering will be
taken. Reservations/info: 586.1741.
July 19: Parent Practicum Con-
ference, continuing through July 21
at Heritage Baptist Church, 538
Venard Road, Clarks Summit,
from 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. Free and
open to all local parents and
interested adults, this event is
designed to challenge and inspire
participants along the journey of
Christian home-centered educa-
tion while causing growth in
understanding of the classical
model of education. Info/register:
www.classicalconversations.com,
586.2449 or bbjanus@epix.net by
July 11.
Nature Ramble with Rebecca
Lesko, at 6 p.m. at Endless Moun-
tain Nature Center (EMNC).
Recomended for adults and chil-
dren first grade and above accom-
panied by an adult. Participants
are invited to bring binoculars.
Cost: $5 or free for EMNC Stew-
ards.
July 20: Disadvantaged
Groups in History Presentation,
at the Abington Community
Library. Open to adults. Historian
Alexander Vari of Marywood
University will focus on chil-
drens experiences in WWll in
Europe. Info: 587.3440.
Wildlife in Your Watershed, at
the Lackawanna State Park
Campground Amphitheater at 6
p.m. Cheryl Nolan, Lackawanna
County Cons. Dist. Watershed
Specialist, will introduce a variety
of wildlife that share the wa-
tershed. Recommended for kids.
Info: 945.7110 or www.visit-
PAparks.com.
Star Search II, at the Lacka-
wanna State Park Campground
Amphitheater at 9 p.m. The
Lackawanna Astronomical Socie-
ty will share a slideshow present-
ation, their celestial knowledge
and telescopes. Info: 945.7110 or
www.visitPAparks.com.
July 21: South Abington Twp
Police and Maintenance Depart-
ments 17th Annual Childrens
Fishing Derby, at the Lackawanna
State Park from 9 a.m. to 1:30
p.m. Open to children up to 15
years of age. An adult must
accompany all children. Bait will
be provided and there is no cost to
enter. Hot dogs and soda provid-
ed. Register (required): 586.2111
or satpd@comcast.net.
Chicken BBQ, at Clarks Sum-
mit United Methodist Church
from11a.m. - 5 p.m. Dinner
includes chicken for adults and
for children, baked potato with
butter and sour cream, baked beans,
dinner roll, brownie and ice tea or
lemonade (eat-in only). Cost: $10
for adults and $5 for children 12 and
under.
The Second Annual Kristyn E.
Kromko Memorial Scholarship
Race, at Baptist Bible College in
Clarks Summit. Registration will
run from 7 to 8:30 a.m. and the race
will begin at 9 a.m. A two-mile walk
and run. Benefits the Kristyn E.
Kromko Scholarship Fund. Cost:
$15. Pre-registration forms are
available for download at neparun-
ner.com and forkristyn.com.
Birds Gotta Fly; But Where Do
They Land Workshop, at the Lacka-
wanna State Park Environmental
Learning Center and Park Vicinity
from 8 a.m. to noon. Recommended
for landowners who wish to manage
their properties for resident and
migrating songbirds. Registration
required. Info/register: 945.7110.
July 23: Dalton Fire Co. Ladies
Auxiliary Bingo, at the Dalton Fire
Co. Hall 6:45 p.m.
July 25: Second Annual Kids
Fitness Camp, at the Dalton Stream-
side Park from10 - 11:30 a.m. There
is no required cost, but participants
may give a donation. All proceeds
will benefit the Griffin Pond Animal
Shelter. Info: www.getfitwithdr-
dawn.com or call Dawn Strickland
at 563.2064.
July 26: Comm Square Fair, at
The Waverly Community House,
1115 North Abington Road, Waverly,
from 4:30 to 8 p.m. Features Music
on the back lawn by Music for
Models, carnival games, food and
beverages. Info: www.waverlycom-
m.org or 586.8191, ext. 2.
Festival of Nations, at Clarks
Summit Senior Living, 950 Morgan
Highway, from 4:30 6: 30 p.m.
Features international food, music,
and live entertainment performed by
Doug Smith of Lexington Entertain-
ment. Proceeds benefit the Alz-
heimers Association. Cost: $10.
Reservations/info: 586.8080. RSVP
Deadline: July 16.
COMMUNITY
CALENDAR
Acaption that appeared with
a story about Countryside Con-
servancy hikes in the July11
edition included an incorrect
reference. It should have stated:
Jerry Petula points out that the
Eastern Hemlock is Pennsylva-
nias state tree and at one time in
history, Pennsylvania was a
world leader in the production
of lumber. The Eastern Hem-
locks bark was also used to
make tannic acid.
We regret the error.
EDITORS NOTE
Editor,
The Athletic Director for
the Abington Heights School
District recently resigned.
The school board should
not seek to refill this posi-
tion, just as it has not refilled
so many other positions, in-
cluding a number of teachers,
which are vacant due to re-
tirement and resignations.
Unlike the teaching and
other positions, the Athletic
Director is not a necessary
position and does nothing to
enhance the education of the
students.
In fact there is no need for
such a position, period. Sev-
eral years ago at a board
meeting I asked just what the
responsibilities of the Athlet-
ic Director are, and each one
stated is something that could
and should be handled by
other members of the district
staff. Yet the position was
maintained, at a full- time
level, no less, with a salary
and benefit package equal to
or greater than many teachers
receive.
The district was forced to
use attrition regarding the
now vacant positions, and
only then after much eval-
uation and debate. No such
consideration is necessary
over this position, it simply
needs to be eliminated.
The core of any school
district is supposed to be
academics, not athletics.
There is no mandate to have
any interscholastic sports
programs. As such, they need
to be the first area cut in any
school districts budget deci-
sions in lieu of tax increases
or use of reserve funds, in-
cluding the post of Athletic
Director.
David Kveragas
Newton Township
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Editor:
Ive been a bagpiper in the
Wyoming Valley Pipe and
Drum Band for 10 years. Im
turning 63 in August. Recent-
ly, at several parades, Ive had
to step aside and let my band
mates take my place in line.
Its not my age thats stopping
me from doing what I love.
Its my asthma and COPD.
I was diagnosed with chron-
ic obstructive pulmonary dis-
ease (COPD) and asthma 15
years ago. Many people are
surprised to find out that I am
able to play the bagpipes with
my asthma and lung compli-
cations. A bagpiper with
asthma, how unusual, one-
of-a kind! they say. Yet, I like
to think my hobby helps my
lungs. As I keep the bag in-
flated by blowing into it
through the blowpipe, I can
feel my lungs growing stron-
ger with each breath.
Unfortunately, it saddens
me that my daughter and my
grandson have also been diag-
nosed with asthma. Its very
important to me that we are
able to still spend time togeth-
er, without our asthma affect-
ing us.
My daughter has been ac-
tively participating in the
Fight for Air Walks, spon-
sored by the American Lung
Association. When I was
asked to perform at the
Wilkes-Barre Fight for Air
Walk, I thought it would be a
great opportunity for my
daughter and I to spend time
together, fighting our asthma
together.
There are many occasions
when my asthma and COPD
can interfere with my enjoy-
ment in performing. The most
recent was at the walk I par-
ticipated in with my daughter.
My lungs couldnt make it.
After one lap around the
track, I had to step to the side.
It means a lot to support a
cause that is so close to our
family. Ill keep coming to the
walks, bringing my daughter
and bagpipe along, as long as
Im able.
Im proud to support the
American Lung Association
and its efforts to fight lung
disease and to ensure healthy
air for all Pennsylvanians. My
family is only one of the many
that your support could help
result in cures for the lung
diseases that have affected
those across Pennsylvania.
Please join the fight against
weakening air pollution regu-
lations. Please contact your
elected officials and let them
know that we expect them to
fight for clean air and stand
up to the companies that want
to put profits before people.
Healthy air means healthy
lungs.
Butch Modzelewski
Wilkes-Barre
Parade entries are requested
for the Christy Mathewson
Days parade. Groups, musi-
cians, athletes and floats are all
welcome.
This years parade time was
changed to 5 p.m. August 11.
The parade will begin at Keys-
tone College and end at Christy
Mathewson Park in Factory-
ville, where the Saturday eve-
ning events will then begin.
Anyone interested in partici-
pating in the parade is asked to
contact Steve OMalley at
570.945.5877.
Christy Mathewson Days
Parade entries sought
Community members are invited to participate in a com-
munity health fair and blood drive July 18 from 9 a.m. 3
p.m. at The Commonwealth Medical College (TCMC), 525
Pine Street, Scranton.
All presenting blood donors will receive a free T-shirt and
coupon for a free carton of Friendlys ice cream. Students
participating in the fair will provide blood pressure screen-
ings and health information on various health topics includ-
ing: blood donation, hand hygiene, cancer, nutrition, yoga,
oral health, car seat safety, substance abuse, household safe-
ty, CPR, vaccinations and more. Door prizes will be provid-
ed by local retail establishments and restaurants.
TCMC community health fair planning committee mem-
bers from left: Nicholas Russo, Jong Shin, Jacqueline Olson,
Luis Perez, Mary Casey, Mollie Comstock, Raynell Peacock,
Ida L. Castro, JD, MA, TCMC vice president, Community
Engagement and Equity and Shannon Ludwig, communi-
cations manager, American Red Cross.
TCMC plans health fair, blood drive
C M Y K
WEDNESDAY, JULY18, 2012 THE ABINGTON JOURNALCLARKS SUMMIT, PA WWW.THEABINGTONJOURNAL.COM PAGE 3A
* Annual Percentage Rate shown is for loans with auto draft of payments from a Citizens Savings Bank Deposit Account. Payment for rates shown are based on $1,000
borrowed and are as follows: For 60 months at 3.99% ($18.41); 120 months at 4.49% ($10.36). Rates subject to change without notice. If the loan is paid off within 24
months of the origination date, the borrower will be responsible to reimburse Citizens Savings Bank for all third party origination fees paid. No bank fees except the cost of
recording the mortgage.
800.692.6279
www.citizens-savings.com
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5 Year Fixed Rate
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Go To The Community Banking LEADER
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Member FDIC
The sight of a ferris wheel in Dalton
can only mean the carnival is in town. A
parade, dunk tank, classic car show and
of course, the rides, were part of the
Dalton Fire Company Carnival hosted
July 10 to 14 at Carnival Grounds, Bank
Street, Dalton.
Events included a car cruise July 11
and parade July 13. Bands performed
nightly.
ABINGTON JOURNAL PHOTOS/ALICE STUFFLE
ABOVE:Hanna Adonizio, 7 and Jake Adonizio, 3, Clarks Summit take a spin on the ferris wheel.
FRONT PAGE: Sean Gilroy, 5, of Dalton, on a slide.
Mary Sujkowski lends a hand.
AT LEFT: Ned Sherman of Factoryville
Carnival
and
CARS
ABOVE: Dominick Scarfo, 12, Scranton, tries
his luck at the dunk tank.
CLARKS SUMMIT- The
Borough of Clarks Summit and
South Abington Township sew-
er agreement was a topic of
discussion at the Clarks Summit
Council meeting July11. At-
torney Greg Pascale was in
attendance, representing a client
caught in the middle of an on-
going dispute between the two
municipalities.
Pascale first approached
Council at its June13 meeting
on behalf of Tech 78, a compa-
ny planning a townhouse devel-
opment on Winola Road. He
said the South Abington Town-
ship Planning Commission gave
conditional approval of the
plans two weeks prior to that
date; one of the conditions re-
quiring a sewer pass-through
agreement be made with the
Borough of Clarks Summit.
Borough Manager Virginia
Kehoe explained at the June13
meeting, We had informed
South Abington Township that
until and unless we resolve our
issues with pass-throughs and
direct connects, that we would
allowno newconnections. So
obviously, thats put Attorney
Pascale in a bind, and thats why
hes here to talk to us.
At that time, council suggest-
ed Pascale get in touch with
South Abington Township So-
licitor Bill Jones. Council stated
that the burden of responsibility
rested with South Abington
Township.
Pascale returned to the July11
meeting, however, unsatisfied
with that response.
Still in negotiation with the
South Abington Township,
Council stood its ground.
Council voted to table the
issue.
Its about fairness for my
client, Pascale said, and if we
cant get this resolved because
of a fight between two munici-
palities, then well have to take
recourse in the courts. Thats all
there is to it.
RansomTownship Super-
visor and Abington Council of
Governments (ACOG) Presi-
dent Dennis Macheska attended
the meeting to report on the
Comcast contract renewal proc-
ess. He said he does not have a
lot of information yet and that
the municipalities will have to
wait the attorney involved. He
said he believes the negation
start date is Sept. 2.
Council recognized the
Abington Memorial VFWPost
7069 for hosting the Clarks
Summit Memorial Day Parade.
Athank-you was read to several
members of the Post in attend-
ance and a certificate presented.
Council voted to pass four
ordinances, including:
Ordinance 2012-05, a cura-
tive amendment to change the
zoning for a property on Old
Lackawanna Trail Rd. froma
manufacturing industry zone to
a commercial zone
Ordinance 2012-06, a park-
ing amendment for Depot Street
Ordinance 2012-07, an
update to the stormwater ordi-
nance
Ordinance 2012-08, a sign
ordinance amendment allowing
businesses to obtain a permit to
hang flags, no larger than15
square feet, in front of their
buildings at a maximumheight
of 36 feet and minimumof 7
feet.
Councilwoman Patty Lawler
gave the recycling report and
talked about the upcoming
Aug.1transition to single stream
recycling, a systemin which all
recyclable materials are placed
in one bin to be sorted at a proc-
essing center. She said informa-
tion will be sent to residents.
Sewer
connection
remains
on hold
Developer stuck amid Clarks
Summit, S. Abington dispute
BY ELIZABETH BAUMEISTER
lbaumeister@theabingtonjournal.com
For the first time last year,
chiropractor and certified
fitness trainer Dawn Strick-
land offered a childrens fit-
ness camp, which benefited
the Griffin Pond Animal Shel-
ter, at Dalton Streamside Park
and more than 50 attended.
This year she plans to hold the
camp again.
The camp is designed for
children between the ages of 3
and13 and features different
stations where they can work
out while having fun. The
activities will be geared to-
ward different age groups.
Included among the activities
are an obstacle course, a phys-
ical fitness test, freeze dance
and parachute games.
The camp is designed as a
way to get children away from
video games and TVand out
and staying fit.
Its a great cause. I like to
promote fitness with kids so
they can see that its a lot of
fun, Strickland said.
All proceeds will be donat-
ed to the Griffin Pond Animal
Shelter. Last year, volunteers
fromthe shelter brought a
group of animals for the chil-
dren to pet and enjoy. The
shelter may once again bring
some animals, she said.
Strickland hopes her camp
will help fill a gap in fitness
education, which for the most
part only caters to adults.
There arent a lot of things
for kids. Sometimes its kind
of nice for kids to run around
and have fun and do regular
types of exercises instead of
organized sports.
The suggested donation for
the camp is $5 per child. The
camp runs from10 a.m. to
11:30. For more information,
see www.getfitwithdrdawn-
.comor call 570.563.2064.
The FUN of fitness
BY GERARD E. NOLAN
Abington Journal Correspondent
FILE PHOTO/ELIZABETH BAUMEISTER
Fitness camp fundraiser in 2011
at the Dalton Streamside Park
July 20. From left: Keaton Lisk,
Cali Seechok, and Emmy Jones.
Abington Heights Civic League, Inc. member Patti Pallo
presents Abington Community Library staff with a donation
check for $500 to be used toward summer reading programs.
Accepting the check, from left, are Nancy Burke, Mary Ann
McGrath and Leah Ducato Rudolph.
Civic League
donates to library
The Kristyn E. Kromko
Memorial Scholarship
Race, scheduled for July
21 at Baptist Bible Col-
lege, Clarks Summit, is
planned to be a Cele-
bration of life, according
to co-organizer Ruth Man-
cuso, of Tunkhannock.
The event was held for
the first time last year in
memory of Mancusos
niece, Kristyn Kromko, to
raise money for a scholar-
ship fund open to Abing-
ton Heights High School
seniors who display similar
qualities to those remem-
bered in Kromko by her
family and friends.
Kromko died in an auto-
mobile accident April 26,
2010 at age 16, just three
weeks after receiving her
drivers license. She resid-
ed in Clarks Summit with
her parents, Joseph and
Roberta Kromko and
brother, Brandon Kromko.
Following the accident, the
family started a $1,000
scholarship in her memory
at Abington Heights,
where both siblings attend-
ed.
Mancuso said her niece
had a carefree happy-go-
lucky spirit.
She just lit up the
world, she said. She
loved her friends and loved
her family.
Mancuso said the family
started the scholarship out
of gratitude to the commu-
nity, especially the high
school. We just want to
give back, she said.
When Kristyns accident
happened, it was devas-
tating. She added that
people from the school
rallied to the familys side
almost immediately, pro-
viding an abundance of
support, as if they
couldnt help enough.
Even after the atmo-
sphere began to settle, the
support continued. Accord-
ing to Mancuso, Kromko
would have graduated this
year, had she lived, and in
her honor, the class wore
small gold pins on their
gowns at graduation.
The class hasnt forgot-
ten her, and they wont,
Mancuso said.
The support still contin-
ues as Mancuso and her
co-organizer, Kristyns
friend Kate Grow plan the
race. Mancuso said she is
grateful for each of the
many people helping to
make the event happen,
including Kromkos class-
mates who are baking doz-
ens of muffins for that
day.
Its really overwhelming,
Mancuso said. I just men-
tion Kristyns name, and
everyone wants to help
outEveryone has been so
giving, so supportive.
Registration for the race,
which is a two-mile walk
and run, will be held from
7 to 8:30 a.m. and the race
will begin at 9 a.m. Pre-
registration forms are
available for download at
neparunner.com and fork-
ristyn.com. There is a $15
registration fee, which
benefits the Kristyn E.
Kromko Memorial Schol-
arship Fund.
T-shirts, designed by
Kate Grow, will be given
to at least the first 100
registered participants,
along with tote bags and
other surprises. Fruit bas-
kets, drinking water and
muffins will also be avail-
able the day of the race.
Celebration
of LIFE
BY ELIZABETH BAUMEISTER
lbaumeister@theabingtonjournal.com
ABINGTON JOURNAL FILE PHOTO
John Shebby pours water onto his
head to cool down after the 2011
race.
Julie Sidoni of WNEP and
Selena from FROGGY101
will host the Girls Night In,
a slumber party benefit for
Marleys Mission, Aug. 17 at
the Hilton Conference Center,
Scranton.
This women-only event
features a full night of pam-
pering, from shopping to fa-
cials to specialty drinks.
Space is limited. Participa-
nts must be 21 or older to
attend. For reservations, call
570.343.3000.
Slumber party to benefit
Marleys Mission
C M Y K
PAGE 4A THE ABINGTON JOURNALCLARKS SUMMIT, PA WEDNESDAY, JULY18, 2012
CROSSWORDS
The Griffin Pond
Animal Shelter, 967
Griffin Pond Rd.,
Clarks Summit, is
open for the adop-
tion of pets from
noon to 4:30 p.m.,
daily. Wish list items
are always appre-
ciated, especially
kitty litter and paper
towels.
My name is ... Cory
Name: Cory
Sex: Neutered male
Age: 6 years old
About me: I have my front paws declawed. I
am a little shy, but a very sweet kitty.
Remember to contact the Griffin Pond Animal
Shelter at 586.3700 if your pet is lost or goes
astray.
Everythings coming up gera-
niums at the Waverly Commu-
nity House.
In support of Science Week
at the Waverly Community
Houses summer Comm Camp,
Eric Beichler of Beichlers
Greenhouse in Dalton donated
110 potted geraniums that he
grew just for Comm Camp.
Because of this gift, participa-
nts in week three of Comm
Camp will learn all about plant-
ing and caring for geraniums
and other flower favorites.
For more information on
Comm Camp, visit www.waver-
lycomm.org or call the Comm
office at 570.586.8191, exten-
sion 2.
For more information on Bei-
chlers Greenhouse, call the
Greenhouse at 570.563.1109.
The Waverly Community
House is located at 1115 North
Abington Road in Waverly.
Shown, from left loading geraniums onto Comm truck at Beichlers Greenhouse
in Dalton, are: Adrienne Gwyn, Comm Camp Co-Director; Eric Beichler and
John Yesavage, Comm maintenance staff.
Greenhouse donates
flowers to Comm Camp
CROSSWORD ANSWERS PAGE 11
RANSOMTWP. - Andrew
Massimilian, of RansomRecre-
ational Shooting Sports, LLC,
submitted newplans at the
RansomTownship Planning
Commission meeting July16,
for the proposed shooting range
land development at 1500 Ran-
somRoad.
Massimilian gave members
of the Planning Commission a
brief explanation of the new
plans as they skimmed the
pages. The planning commis-
sion then voted to accept the
plans for review, a process it
has 90 days to complete.
RansomTownship resident
Hank Rowinski, on behalf of
the RansomTownship Tax
Payers Association, inquired
about purchasing a copy of the
newplans. The Planning Com-
mission suggested he bring the
request to the next Supervisors
work session.
Ransom
reviews
new plans
for range
By Elizabeth Baumeister
lbaumeister@theabingtonjournal.com
Adopt a cage at the
Griffin Pond Animal Shel-
ter for one month and
your $20 donation will go
toward care and feeding
of the animal in that cage
for the month you choose.
A card will be placed on
the cage identifying the
sponsor for that month.
Send the following
Adopt-a-Cage informa-
tion, including name,
address, city, state and
zip, phone number,
sponsor month, choice
of dog, cat or small
animal cage and how you
would like your sponsor
card to appear, along
with $20 for each cage
to The Griffin Pond Animal
Shelter, 967 Griffin Pond
Rd., Clarks Summit, PA 1841
1.
C M Y K
WEDNESDAY, JULY18, 2012 THE ABINGTON JOURNALCLARKS SUMMIT, PA WWW.THEABINGTONJOURNAL.COM PAGE 5A
C M Y K
PAGE 6A www.theabingtonjournal.com The Abington JournalClarks Summit, PA WEDNESDAY, JULY18, 2012
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Ca ll 1- 8 00- 2 73- 7130 To Ad vertis e
R eligious S ervice C alendar
O UR LADY O F
THE S NO W S
S t. Ben ed ict
S ATUR DAY
VIGIL M AS S ES
4 p .m . S t. Ben ed ict
5 p .m . Ou rL ad yof
the S n ows
6:30 p .m . Ou rL ad y
ofthe S n ows
S UNDAY
7 a.m . Ou rL ad yof
the S n ows
8 a.m . S t. Ben ed ict
9:30 a.m . Ou rL ad y
ofthe S n ows
11:00 a.m . S t. Ben ed ict
11:15 Ou rL ad y
ofthe S n ows
12:20 S t. Ben ed ict
CO NFES S IO NS
S ATUR DAYS
3:00 p .m . S t. Ben ed ict
6:00 p .m . Ou rL ad y
ofthe S n ows
(570) 586- 1741
Ca tholic Luthera n
TR INITY LUTHER AN CHUR CH
205 W . Grove S treet
Rev. George M athewsP astor
W ors hip S e rvic e s
S atu rd ay7:00 p .m .
Con tem p oraryS u n d ayS ervice 8:15 a.m .
Trad ition al S ervice 9:30 a.m .
www.Trin ityL u theran cs.com
Call ou rP reschool:
586- 5590
Chu rch Office
587- 1088
THE CHUR CH
O F THE EP IP HANY
25 Chu rch Hill,
Glen b u rn Twp ., P A.
(2 M ilesNorth of
ClarksS u m m it)
Com e join u sfor
worship on
S UND AY
8:00am & 10:30am
HOL Y EUCHARIS T
9:00 S u n d ayS chool
& Ad u ltF oru m
W ED NES D AY
9:30AM
HOL Y EUCHARIS T
5 63- 15 64
www.ep ip han y
glen b u rn .org
God sheart& han d sin
the Ab in gton s
FIR S T BAP TIS T CHUR CH
O F ABINGTO N
1216 N. Ab in gton Rd
( corn erofAb in gton & Carb on d ale)
Com e Join UsF or
S ervicesS u n d ay
M orn in g 11:00 a.m .
P astorK en n eth K n ap p
(570) 587- 4492
Ba p tis t
Chris tia n
CountryAllia nce Church
14014 Orchard D rive, ClarksS u m m it
Acros s f rom Red BarnV illage,N ewtonT wp.
P astorD an M organ tin i
(570) 587- 2885
Worship Service: Sunday 10:00AM
Time of Prayer: Sunday 11:15AM
Bible Study: Wednesday 6:00PM
Ep is cop a l Free M ethod is t
W AVER LY
CO M M UNITY
CHUR CH
101 Carb on d ale Rd
S erm on S eries
W ord sofJesu s
M orn in g W orship
11 am
Nu rsery&
Child ren sChu rch
Availab le
P astorJam esCohen
(570) 587- 2280
waverlycom m u n itychu rch.org
P res b yteria n
FIR S T P R ES BYTER IAN
CHUR CH
300 S chool S t.,
ClarksS u m m it
W orship with u son
S u n d aym orn in gs
10am
Child care availab le
all m orn in g!
5 8 6-63 06
www. fp c c s . org
Wayne Bank recently participated in The American Bankers
Association Education Foundations Teach Children to Save Pro-
gram, which encourages bank employees to volunteer to help
children understand concepts related to money.
Jeanne Corey, Branch Manager of the Abington Community
Office in Clarks Summit presented banking and financial con-
cepts to 45 children at the Summit Christian Academy in grades
1 through 6.
Shown are, first row: Jillian Lewis. Second row, from left: Jai-li
Comacho, Jonathan Corey, Madison Howell, Emily Howell and
Christopher Corey, students of Summit Christian Academy. Third
row: Jessica Jennings and Amy Zimmerman, teachers at Summit
Christian Academy and Jeanne Corey, Branch Manager of Wayne
Banks Clarks Summit branch.
Children learn about money
Abington Heights School District honored students as Citizens of the
Year.
They are shown, front row, from left: Alison Gilmore, Corey Tokash,
Miriam Barren, Jarred Ocwieja, Sadie Henzes, Tristin Piazza, Adele
Hollander, Rory Harris, and Paige Moletsky. Back row: Elementary
Principal Robert Bugno, Superintendent Dr. Michael Mahon, Elementary
Principal Steven Aquilina, and Assistant Superintendent Dr. Thomas
Quinn.
The students received commemorative plaques.
Students honored at
Abington Heights
in public. It was definitely
intimidating.
The local Rotary Club had
difficulty at first finding a
family willing to host her,
she said. Soon after her arriv-
al, many were volunteering.
She ended up living with
seven different families over
a nine-month period. Murithi
emphasized that she could
not help but fall in love with
the Filipino people. They
were very welcoming and
just so hospitable, she said.
Murithi was placed in
Lucena. She said the Rotar-
ians there felt she would have
a better experience of their
culture if she visited those
cities that were not Amer-
icanized. The slight problem
for Murithi was
that she had
not learned
the language,
Tagalog. The
Philippines
isthe third
largest En-
N
oni Murithi, 17, is no
stranger to interna-
tional travel. Stamped
on her passport are visas
fromthe Netherlands, Belgi-
um, England, France, Kenya,
Panama, Slovakia and Jamai-
ca among others. She lives
with her momand younger
brother in South Abington
Twp.
As a native of Kenya and
world traveler herself, Mu-
rithis mother, Tata Mbugua
felt it was important for her
children to travel and learn
about culture by living with
the locals. Traveling with her
family instilled a great appre-
ciation for life abroad, and
the Rotary Club of the
Abingtons exchange student
programseemed like another
way to experience a place
newto her: the Philippines.
The Philippines were un-
like any place she had visited,
Murithi said, and most strik-
ing for her was the general
reaction to her skin color.
The Philippines are a homo-
geneous society; any foreign-
er stands out. Unsettling to
Murithi was their viewof
beauty: white is beautiful.
She could not find a skin
product without lightening
agents. After a fruitless
search for moisturizer that
would not change her skin
tone, her mother had to send
some fromthe United States.
Ive never had any prob-
lemwith my skin or the
way I look; when my host
parents told me I should try
skin lighteners to look
more beautiful, I simply
said no.
In a place with so much
common ancestry, people
would openly stare at her
glish-speaking country in the
world. However, in Lucena
everyone spoke Tagalog.
It was about four months
before I got a handle on the
language. We traveled a lot to
different parts of the Philip-
pines and were exposed to
different dialects too. It made
it very confusing, said Mu-
rithi.
The cuisine, different from
anything else Murithi had
experienced, held several
surprises..
One morning for breakfast,
she received what she
thought was a hard-boiled
egg. She cracked into it and
discovered a half-developed
bird fetus, with feathers and a
beak, or a balut, a delicacy
enjoyed by Filipinos.
Here a family might
bring home pizza as a
treat on a Friday night.
There, a tray of balut
would be brought home,
and everyone was excited
about it, said Murithi. It
was common to see ven-
dors selling ske-
wered bats on the
streets and wild
dog meat in-
cluded with stir
fry dishes.
On a normal
day, she was
served rice four
to five times.
I became so
sick of rice.
Even at
McDonalds,
instead of
serving French
fries, you got
rice. If you said
no to rice, people would tease
you and assume you must be
on a diet.
In Lucena, Murithi studied
as a high school senior. There
the school day is10 hours
and students attend until age
16.
Teens who were dating
often attended church togeth-
er, said Murithi. And the only
time Murithi was allowed to
meet up with friends socially
was at church-related gather-
ings. The Philippines are
approximately 83 percent
Catholic, and Murithi ob-
served, very devout. During
the Holy Week, she recalled
spending an entire day at-
tending14 different churches
of the14 different saints
considered there to be the
most important. One of her
host mothers organized
weekly prayer meetings.
Murithi said she thinks
more students should take
advantage of the opportunity
presented by the Rotary Club
of the Abingtons.
Culture is omnipresent in
a society. Its not just what
you wear and traditional
dances and food. It includes
the smaller things that you
really start to notice when
you go somewhere complete-
ly different, said Murithi.
I felt very much like an
ambassador of the United
States when I was there.
Murithi said she would like
to focus on international
studies when she attends
college and someday be an
official ambassador of the
United States in a foreign
country.
ABINGTON JOURNAL/MAURA KENNEDY
South Abington Township resident Noni Murithi, 17,
a native of Kenya, participated in the Rotary Club of
the Abingtons exchange student program with a
visit to the Philippines.
Future ambassador?
BY MAURA KENNEDY
Abington Journal Correspondent
Two Factoryville civic orga-
nizations selected the same
Lackawanna Trail High School
senior as the recipient of their
annual scholarships.
On class night at Lackawanna
Trail High School May 30,
Jamie Reese received scholar-
ships and awards: Trail Rotary
Service &Leadership Award,
Factoryville Womens Civic
Club Award, a Lackawanna
Trail Booster Club Scholarship
and the Interact Club Service
Above Self Scholarship. These
scholarships and awards were
determined by various orga-
nizations based on academic,
athletic, character, leadership
and service profiles, as well as
various other factors including
essays.
Reese also earned The Board
of Governors Tuition Scholar-
ship for Science and Technol-
ogy. The Board of Governors
award is an academic scholar-
ship covering tuition costs for
up to eight semesters.
Reese is an Eagle Scout and
Assistant Scout Master. He was
in the Recycling Club in high
school. He volunteered his time
to Factoryville Borough pro-
jects, including building bench-
es and tables for the newpavil-
ion at the Clinton Township/
Factoryville Borough Joint
Municipal Park.
He is enrolled at East
Stroudsburg University, where
he will major in physics, mathe-
matics and English. He will be a
writer for the Stroud Courier,
active in Honors-run functions
and will work with The
Stroudsburgs Rotary Club to
start a Rotaract Club at the
university. The recent graduate
began his involvement with
Rotary by joining the high
school Interact Club, ages 12-18.
PHOTO COURTESY LISA LOGAN CLOUGH
Jamie Reese, left, winner of scholarships for his community involve-
ment, with Phyllis Wells of the Factoryville Womens Civic League.
PHOTO COURTESY LISA LOGAN CLOUGH
Jamie Reese, right, with Don Demarest, President of Trail Rotary.
L.T. grad honored
Chelsea Youtz,
daughter of Keith
and Sue Youtz of
Clarks Summit,
was named to the
Deans List at Mi-
sericordia Uni-
versity for the
2012 spring semester.
Youtz graduated Summa
Cum Laude in May,
with a major in
Mathematics. While
at Misericordia, she
was on the Track &
Field Team, placing
5th in the Hammer
Throw at the Middle
Atlantic Conference Spring
2012 Championships.
C.S. resident graduates
Youtz
C M Y K
WEDNESDAY, JULY18, 2012 THE ABINGTON JOURNALCLARKS SUMMIT, PA WWW.THEABINGTONJOURNAL.COM PAGE 7A
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Summer
Dr. Samir Pancholyis joined
byClaudia Dima, MD, an
interventional cardiologist, to
expandcardiologyservices
throughout NortheasternPa.
Theyhave announcedthe new
name for their practice, North
PennCardiovascular Special-
ists. The practice will move
this monthtoits newlocation
at 401NorthState Street,
Clarks Summit. Theyantici-
pate seeingpatients bythe end
of July. The facilitywill pro-
vide stress testing, echocar-
diography, pacemaker clinic
andcardiologyconsultation
services. Theywill continue to
provide services intheir Mid-
valley, Tunkhannockand
Susquehanna locations.
Dr. Pancholyhas beenin
cardiologypractice inNorth-
easternPa. since1996andis
aninternational expert in
interventional cardiology,
Director of the cardiology
fellowshipprogramat The
Wright Center for Graduate
Medical EducationandAsso-
ciate Professor of Medicine at
The CommonwealthMedical
College, Scranton. He serves
as sub-editor for the Journal of
Invasive Cardiologyand
Chairs the Transradial Work-
ingGroupof the Societyof
Cardiovascular Angiography
andIntervention.
Dr. Dima is anintervention-
al cardiologist, trainedinNew
JerseyandArizona. She also
serves onfacultyat The
Wright Center for Graduate
Medical Education.
The visionof the practice
remains, toprovide excel-
lence withhumility.
ABINGTON JOURNAL/ELIZABETH BAUMEISTER
From left: Drs. Samir Pancholy and Claudia Dima are moving their
practice to 401 N. State St., Clarks Summit.
Cardiology practice
expands in C.S.
The lawfirmof Oliver Price &
Rhodes, Clarks Summit, has
announced that Karoline Me-
halchick has been named a Ris-
ing Star for the
third year in a
row. Inclusion as
a Rising Star is
an honor extend-
ed to only 2.5
percent of Penn-
sylvania attorneys
under 40, and is
based on a combination of peer
nominations, evaluations and
third party research.
After graduating fromlaw
school, she served as a lawclerk
to the Honorable Trish Corbett,
Judge of the Court of Common
Pleas of Lackawanna County.
Her practice includes general
civil litigation, commercial liti-
gation, and education law. Me-
halchick resides in Scranton with
her husband, Michael Flynn, and
their two children.
Mehalchick
Rising
star named
at law firm
Attorney Daniel W. Munley
spoke at a seminar in Louisville,
Ky., for the Kentucky Justice
Association,
sharing his
expertise on
howto properly
litigate tractor
trailer cases.
Munley is
National Chair-
man of the
American As-
sociation for Justices Trucking
Litigation Group. The group
discusses all the relevant policy
issues pending in Congress.
Munley is a partner in the law
firmof Munley, Munley &Cart-
wright, P.C. and resides in Clarks
Summit with his wife Valerie and
three children.
Munley
Munley
speaks at
seminar
Marine Corps Pvt. Matthew
J. Thompson, son of Celia
Blannett of Hanover Town-
ship. and Thomas Thompson,
of Clarks Summit, earned the
title of United States Marine
after graduating fromrecruit
training at Marine Corps
Recruit Depot, Parris Island,
S. C.
For 13 weeks, Thompson
stayed committed during some
of the worlds most demanding
entry-level military training in
order to be transformed from
civilian to Marine. He is a 2011
graduate of Abington Heights
High School.
AH grad a Marine
C M Y K
PAGE 8A www.theabingtonjournal.com The Abington JournalClarks Summit, PA WEDNESDAY, JULY18, 2012
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Abington Farmers Market
Saturdays 9am - 2pm
OPENING DAY
JULY 21!!!!
Located at South Abington Park
Chinchilla, PA
Featuring the freshest
local fruits, vegetables,
herbs, owers, baked
goods & more!
Marywood University Ser-
vice-Learning Coordinator,
Anne OBrien, assisted by Lisa
Casella, initiated an offer for
university staff to contribute
time at the Abington Area
Community Park. For several
hours June16, a group of Mary-
wood University staff planted
shrubs and perennials along the
parks Lower Staircase,
mulched, weeded and watered
plants.
Others also helped make the
project a success. It began with
an anonymous donor who pro-
vided the park with more than
$2,000 of established plants as
well as to help with stormwater
management strategy. The
Waverly Department of Public
Works Crewled by Thomas
James, Jason Morris and Steve
Bray removed sod and distrib-
uted newsoil. Justus Hardware
donated soil to facilitate the
transplanting. Corkys Green-
house donated mulch for the
final touch for the beautifica-
tion project. TimMcCoy,
Abington Area Joint Recreation
Board member, donated time to
pick up the mulch. The Peren-
nial/Shrub Planting effort was
managed by Donna Zagrapan,
Master Gardener and Abington
Community Garden Co-Chair
and by Jennifer Wynn, Abing-
ton Area Community Park
Volunteer Coordinator.
PHOTO COURTESY JENNIFER WYNN
Marywood University Service-Learning Coordinator, Anne OBrien, as-
sisted by Lisa Casella, initiated an offer for university staff to contribute
time at the Abington Area Community Park June 16. Marywood Uni-
versity Staff, shown at the park, include, first row, from left: Nicole
Loyek, Ann OBrien, Rose Jacklinski holding Christine Jacklinski, Sr.
John Michele Southwick, IHM. Second row: Chris OBrien, Melissa
Saddlemire, Lisa Casella, Amy Paciej-Woodruff. Absent from photo: Kay
McClintock
Marywood staff donates time at park
A Second Friday Art
Walk was hosted July 13
in Clarks Summit, spon-
sored by the Arts Council
of the Abingtons.
Artist Helmut Kunst,
whose work was featured
at Edward Jones, 406 S.
State St., described the
monthly art walk, Its
something new for the
community...It creates a
dual treasure for the artists
and businesses alike.
ABINGTON JOURNAL/JESSIE FOX
Esther Staples, 82, presented work she started about three years ago at Sole to Soul. .
Art Walk a uniting force
ABOVE: Gwyneth Steele of Tingly Glass, Jack Lawrence of
Lawrence Studio, and Marilyn and Richard Roberts of White
Rabbit Stained Glass, set up their work for the Art Walk at Beta
Bread Bakery.
BELOW: Ellie Smith, 9, and Claire Boyle, 9, who sat outside
Duffys Coffee House and gave free samples of iced coffee and
cupcakes during the Second Friday Art Walk.
AT RIGHT: Seth Oravec, 21,
displayed his paintings at
Sole to Soul, 535 S. State
St., during the Second
Friday Art Walk.
Kenneth M. Rink, son of
Thomas L. and Catherine A.
Rink, Glenburn Twp., was
awarded the rank of Eagle
Scout March 21. He is a mem-
ber of Boy Scout Troop 251,
Clarks Green. Michael Minello
serves as Scoutmaster.
Rink joined Cub Scouts as a
Tiger Cub in Pack 251, Clarks
Green. He advanced through
the ranks of Wolf, Bear, Webe-
los I, and Webelos II, earning
all 20 activity pins and the Ar-
rowof Light before crossing
over to Boy Scout Troop 251in
2006. He earned the Boy Scout
Tenderfoot rank in 2006; Sec-
ond Class in 2007; First Class
in 2008; Star in 2009; Life in
2010; and Eagle in 2012, the
centennial of the Eagle Scout
Badge.
During his time in scouting,
Rink has served as the Troop
Historian, Quartermaster,
Scribe, Assistant Patrol Leader,
Patrol Leader, Senior Patrol
Leader, OATroop Representa-
tive, Chaplain Aide and Junior
Assistant Scoutmaster.
He was elected into the Order
of the Arrow, Lowwapaneu
Lodge #191in 2010, completing
his Ordeal in May of that year.
In 2011, he became a Brother-
hood member. He has earned
28 merit badges, the World
Conservation Award, and the
God and Country Religious
Award and has completed the
Gettysburg National Park His-
toric Trail Hike.
Rink will be a senior at
Abington Heights High School
this fall. He has taken honors
classes in English, Science,
Russian and engineering the
past three years. He has earned
two gold medals and one silver
medal over three years in the
Russian Olympiada Competi-
tion and an honorable mention
in the 2010 National Russian
Essay Contest. In April 2012,
he was inducted into the Na-
tional Honor Society. He plans
to become an engineer.
Rinks Eagle Project was
resurfacing the side yard at the
Clarks Green United Methodist
Church where Troop 251holds
its weekly meetings. His project
involved spreading top soil to
cover up roots and uneven re-
gions of the yard with his 30
volunteers. Afterward scouts
spread lime and fertilizer before
planting fresh grass. Combined,
Rink and his volunteers spent
more than170 hours planning
and carrying out the project.
Rink, a member of Clarks
Green United Methodist
Church, continues to help
maintain the yard. He was hon-
ored at Boy Scout Troop 251s
Eagle Banquet and Court of
Honor May 27 at the Montdale
Country Club.
Scout earns Eagle
Kenneth M. Rink, Eagle Scout
The Wright Center for
Graduate Medical Education
announced that its board of
directors selected Linda Tho-
mas-Hemak, MD as the new
President and CEO.
Thomas-Hemak has been
with The Wright Centerfor
more than 12 years, serving as
Program Director, Internal
Medicine, and also leading the
team at The Wright Center for
Primary Care Mid Valley
practice. She will continue
actively practicing academic
primary care, as a dually
board certified Internal Med-
icine and Pediatrics provider
taking care of multi-gener-
ational families.
The Wright Center for Pri-
mary Care Mid Valley practice
will open an 18,000 square
foot, $5.8 million primary care
delivery and inter-professional
workforce development clin-
ical showcase this August.
Wright
Center
names new
president
Dr.
Thomas-Hemak
C M Y K
WEDNESDAY, JULY18, 2012 THE ABINGTON JOURNALCLARKS SUMMIT, PA WWW.THEABINGTONJOURNAL.COM PAGE 9A
COSTA DRUGS
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Biking along the crowded
boardwalk in Ocean City on
July 4th, I had to be careful not
to collide with other bikers,
runners and walkers. There
were people of all ages, fam-
ilies exercising together. I sawa
father and son on a bicycle for
two, three generations in a
surrey cart and a mother and
her teenage daughter running
side by side. There were several
older folks being pushed in
wheelchairs and small children
riding with the aid of training
wheels.
Weve been vacationing at
the Jersey shore for years, rent-
ing a house with extended fam-
ily and friends. The role of
exercise in the shore house has
changed dramatically. Before
we all had kids, the competition
was in the drinking games wed
play into the wee hours. Agood
game of quarters at night would
give way to a lot of groggy
young adults waking midday,
just in time to get to the beach.
When the babies started to
arrive, the focus was on trying
to get a fewhours of sleep. No
one had the energy to exercise
as our childrens fussiness was
exacerbated by the close quar-
ters and unfamiliar surround-
ings.
This year the shift was clear.
All of the adults and a good
portion of the children in the
house got out and exercised
each morning. We had a moth-
er/father teamthat ran to the
beach and then swamalong the
shore. One morning they re-
galed us with the story of
swimming next to a large sting
ray. My sister and her husband
go running and my teenage
niece joined them. They came
back to tell of their block-long
sprints and who had won that
day. My husband and I pack
bikes, one child and one adult-
sized, and we go out in pairs. It
was interesting each morning to
see who was up and out first,
who ran or biked the farthest
and if anyone of us dared to
skip a workout and just sleep in.
When I was a kid, we didnt
exercise with our parents. My
father played tennis with his
friends and my mother took a
sporadic jazzercise class. I was
into ballet and softball, but
those activities didnt followme
into adulthood. I was already a
mother of two before exercise
became a part of my routine. I
had tried gyms and aerobics in
my 20s. Back then, as a doughy
girl with an affinity for beer
and potato chips, I really need-
ed it. But it wasnt until
Browns Gymnearly ten years
ago, that I caught on.
Maybe it was the free child-
care, an attractive perk for a
24/7 stay-at-home mom. May-
be it was my new, fit, mom
friends who provided not only
social interaction, but peer
pressure to go. When my tod-
dlers would whine and say they
didnt want to go along with
me, Id have to remind them
that it was I who carted themto
all of their classes and sports
and waited for them. Couldnt
they showme the same respect?
Id remind themthat its healthy
for parents to exercise, so we
can be strong and live long. I
reminded myself that I was
role-modeling healthy habits.
Mom, when can I join the
gym? Ive heard this refrain
for the past fewyears frommy
oldest. I look forward to the day
she is of age to work out along-
side me.
In addition to the efforts our
children see my husband and I
make to exercise, (frequent
conversations about whose turn
it is to go, since the baby is still
too young for Browns child
care room) they have other
positive influences in the com-
munity. Our neighbor is a mara-
thon runner and often invites
our children to train with her.
Theres the Waverly Waddle,
which plenty of the middle
school kids participate in every
year. There are kids gyms like
Fitwize and My Gymin Scran-
ton, which have offered classes
as part of Waverly Elementarys
after school program. My
daughters Brownie troop took
Zumba together and there is a
long list of sports offered by
Waverly township for a nominal
fee.
There is so much chatter in
the media about the sedentary
screen time habits of kids
today. On the other hand, it
seems there are plenty of chil-
dren too busy running to keep
up with their parents to sit still
for long.
Parenthood,
Abington
Style
with Adriane Heine
A family that sweats together
Adriane Heine and her husband,
Doug, own Dublins Pub in West
Scranton and are raising their three
daughters in Waverly. Contact her at
news@theabingtonjournal.com or
with column questions or suggesti-
ons.
OBITUARY
Margaret R. Gallagher
died July 12, one day after
her 70th birthday, at Moses
Taylor Hospital, Scranton.
Her husband is John W.
Gallagher; the couple had
been married for 47 years.
Born in Wyoming County,
she was the daughter of the
late James and Elizabeth
Ross Lancaster. She was a
1961 graduate of Falls Over-
field High School. In addi-
tion to her work as a diet-
ician, she worked for many
years at Skate A Way Roller
Rink, and she was most
recently employed as a chef
at Keystone College. She
enjoyed roller skating, fish-
ing and trips to the casino.
Also surviving is a broth-
er George Lancaster, Lake
Winola; a sister Jean Falh,
Easton; a niece, Linda Os-
lin, Nicholson; two neph-
ews, Robert Oslin, N.C. and
Raymond Oslin, Meshop-
pen; and a great niece, Lori
Oslin, Nicholson.
She was preceded in
death by a sister, Betty Os-
lin.
Funeral service will be
private at the convenience
of the family.
Arrangements are entrust-
ed to the care of the Law-
rence E. Young Funeral
Home, 418 S. State St.,
Clarks Summit. To sign the
online guestbook, visit
www.lawrenceeyoungfuner-
alhome.com.
Margaret R. Gallagher
July 12, 2012
Eugene WalshSr., 89, of
NorthScrantondiedTuesday,
July10, at the GinoMerli Vet-
erans Center inScranton. He
was the husbandof BettyDick-
insonWalshfor 61years.
BorninScranton, he was son
of the late JosephandBertha
Miller Walsh. He was a World
War II armyveteran. After
retiringfromYellowFreight he
workedfor UnitedNeighbor
Center. He was a member of
the Clarks Summit VFWPost
#7060.
Survivingare children,
grandchildren, great grand-
children, several nieces and
nephews anda brother Paul
Walshandhis wife Dorothy.
He was precededindeathby
twobrothers JackandAl Walsh
anda grandsonShawnWalsh.
Per his request there will be a
private graveside service at
GreenwoodCemeteryinGlen-
dale.
Arrangements are entrusted
tothe Lawrence E. Young
Funeral Home, 418S. State St.
Clarks Summit Pa. 18411. To
signthe online guestbook, go
towww.lawrenceeyoungfuner-
alhome.com.
Eugene Walsh Sr.
July 10, 2012
CLARKS GREEN- The
Clarks Green Borough Council
met for its monthly meeting
July 1l. Council discussed the
progress in converting the
sewer billing from the Penn-
sylvania Water Company to the
borough. The first bill from the
borough will arrive in Septem-
ber and reflect any delinquent
payments from the Pennsylva-
nia Water Company. Council
will send out a letter to resi-
dents providing more informa-
tion on the new billing.
Council voted to purchase a
No Through Traffic sign for
the parking lot behind the
borough building because
many members of council
expressed safety concerns.
Council President Keith Wil-
liams read a letter of resigna-
tion from Council member Jill
Shanrock. She stated in the
letter that her resignation is due
to increasing responsibilities
from her full-time job. Her
resignation will go into effect
the last day of July.
Council is seeking applicants
from Clarks Green to fill the
vacancy. Applications and
inquiries can be sent to Jan
Brown at jbrown@clar-
ksgreen.org.
C.G. council
member resigns
Council seeks applicants to
fill board vacancy.
BY EMILY CULLEY
Abington Journal Correspondent
A Wine Tasting Party to benefit the Dalton Community Li-
brary will be held at Maiolatesi Wine Cellars, Sunday, August
19 from 3 to 5 p.m. The cost is a $20 donation. For details, visit
the library at 113 East Main StreetDalton or call 570. 563.2014
Wine party to support library
ABINGTON JOURNAL FILE PHOTO
Wine tasting
participants at
the 2011 event
held at Maiola-
tesi Wine Cel-
lars, Scott Twp.
Arthur D.
Wilson, 72,
of Spring-
ville died
Friday morn-
ing, July 13
at Robert
Packer Hospital, Sayre. Art
was born in Scranton on
January 18, 1940 the son of
the late Eston and Mildred
McGraw Wilson. Arthur was
a teacher at the Abington
Heights High School. He was
a member of the Tunkhan-
nock Rotary and Kiwanis, a
member of the Tunkhannock
Moose Lodge #1276, the
Endless Mountain Garden
Club, and the Chinchilla Vol.
Fire Dept.
Surviving are his wife
Charlene W. Wilson, a son
Edward Wilson of Margaret-
ville, N.Y., a sister Mildred
Young of Melbourne Beach,
Fla.
Art was a wonderful coach
and innovator. He started the
swim program at Abington
Heights in 1967 and the soc-
cer team in the early 1980s.
He also coached track and
volleyball and ended his
career as the Abington
Heights Athletic Director.
Art was not only an excellent
coach but an outstanding
athlete. The records he set in
his senior year for the 220,
440 and 880 yard runs at
Abington Heights have never
been broken.
A memorial service will be
held at St Peters Episcopal
Church on RT 6 in Tunk-
hannock at 10 a.m. August 4,
with Rev. Lou Diva officiat-
ing. Cremains will be present
and a light luncheon will
follow at the church.
For an online condolence,
visit www.aplitwinfuneral-
homes.com
Arthur D. Wilson
July 13, 2012
C M Y K
PAGE 10A www.theabingtonjournal.com The Abington JournalClarks Summit, PA WEDNESDAY, JULY18, 2012
ArtsEtc...
Ciao! Last week students
in the Dietrich Food & Cul-
ture Around the World class
started their culinary trav-
els in Italy. Under the direc-
tion of Seasons Restaurants
Executive Chef Bruce Arro-
wood and the Dietrichs Cul-
tural Assistant Laurel Rad-
zieski, 11 young chefs be-
tween the ages of 10 and 16
learned some of the tradi-
tions of Italy as well as cre-
ated some of that countrys
most well known foods. In
less than 90 minutes, the
group had whipped up meat-
balls, miniature pizzas as
well as biscotti. And believe
me, it all smelled delicious.
Plus Bruce and Laurel taught
the kids about proper food
handling and restaurant
kitchen hygiene. This week
the kids will be touring Mex-
ico on their culinary adven-
ture. I cant wait to see (and
taste) what they create. We
would like to thank Bruce
for volunteering his time and
sharing his talent with us
through this class.
Students will not only
learn about cuisine this
month at the Dietrich, but
they can also experience the
joy of making music. Next
week those talented and zany
guys from Sadie Green Sales
Jugband will be back at the
theater to teach a weeklong
class called Jammin in a
Jugband. David Driskell and
Timothy Walker, Pennsylva-
nia Council on the Arts ros-
tered artists, will teach chil-
dren between the ages of six
and 12 how to make music
with homemade instruments
such as the washboard, wash-
tub bass, spoons, whistles,
saws and jug. The class will
also learn about conventional
instruments such as the gui-
tar banjo, clarinet and sax-
ophone. Classes will be held
on July 23, 24, 25 and 27
from 10 to 11:15 a.m. At the
end of the class, students
will be invited to perform
with the band at Celebrate
Summer at the River on Sat-
urday, July 28 at 3 p.m. at
Tunkhannocks Riverside
Park. Sounds like fun, right?
Class admission is free, but
space is limited. So call us
now at 570.996.1500 for
more information or to sign
up.
If your child is more in-
terested in the visual arts, the
Dietrich will present a camp
during the same week that is
geared more for aspiring
artists. Artists-in-residence
Steve and Amy Colley will
guide students on a fun-filled
adventure in Trash to Trea-
sures Camp. During this
camp, children between the
ages of five and 12 will use
their imaginations as they
MORE THAN
MOVIES
Dietrich Theater
Erica Rogler
See Dietrich, Page 11
Visual Arts/
Performing Arts
Gazebo Concert at Oak-
wood Terrace, July 19 from
2 to 4 p.m. Entertainer Ex-
traordinaire Bill Kuklewicz
will performall types of mu-
sic on his accordion. Cost:
free.
Drive- In Downtown
Outdoor Movie Series, on
Courthouse Square, Scran-
ton. MoviesincludeRocky
July19andanother, TBA, Ju-
ly 26. All movies begin at 9
p.m.
Literary Arts
New Visions Writers
Showcase, July21, from7- 9
p.m. at New Visions Studio
and Gallery, 201Vine Street,
Scranton. Info: 878.3970 or
newvisionsstudio.com.
Playwriting for the High
School Student, at McDade
Center for Literary and Per-
forming Arts, weekdays July
23 -August 3 from 9 - 11:30
a.m. A hands-on workshop
for high school students.
Cost: $300. Info: www.the-
scrantonplayers.com or
941.6327.
Arts, Crafts
and More
Lackawanna County
MarketingYourArtarts
PR seminar, July 18 from
6:30 to 8 p.m. in the Library
Express Branch in The
Steamtown Mall. Cost: free.
Register/info: 963.6590, ext.
106 or calveyc@lackawan-
nacounty.org.
27th Annual Audubon
Art andCraft Festival, July
21 and 22 at Wallenpaupack
Intermediate and Middle
School Complex, Route 6,
Hawley, from 10 a.m. to 5
p.m. Proceeds benefit Envi-
ronmental ScholarshipFund.
Cost: $5. Children under 12
free. Free parking.
Jammin inaJugband, at
theDietrichTheaterindown-
town Tunkhannock July 23,
24, 25, and27from1011:15
a.m. For ages 6 12. Partici-
pants will join Timothy
Walker and David Driskell,
PCA rostered artists, to cre-
ate and make music with
homemade instruments.
They will also be invited to
performwiththebandat Cel-
ebrate Summer at the River
July 28 at 3 p.m. at Tunkhan-
nocksRiversidePark. Regis-
ter: 996.1500. Cost: Free.
Last weeks winner:
Olive Darling
of Clarks Summit
Last weeks answer:
Sally Field
N
ew Visions Stu-
dio and Gallery
will present Ka-
tie Hovencamp, Allison
LaRussa and Evan
West, with an exhibit of
paintings, multi-media
works and sculpture,
July 18 to 29. The artist
reception will be held
July 20 from 6 to 9
p.m. Hovencamp cre-
ates paintings, illustra-
tions, sculptures and
performances. The
visual artist was born in
Newton, N.J. and grew
up in the Pocono
Mountains. She began
studying art at the
Baum School of Art in
Allentown, then moved
to Phoenix, Ariz.,
where she received her
Bachelors in Fine Arts
from Arizona State
University. She is cur-
rently pursuing her
Masters in Fine Arts
degree from Pennsylva-
nia State University.
My work explores
the connection between
the modern world and
fairy tales, Hovencamp
said. These familiar
tales have been passed
down for generations.
When these stories are
told, there are specific
characters we choose
that influence how we
determine our own
morality.
LaRussa, of Scran-
ton, is a Keystone Col-
lege alum and self-
taught artist. A painter
and multi-media artist,
"Envy" by Allison LaRussa
"Duet" by Evan West
Mixing art
See mixing, Page 11
Contestants can only win once in a 60-day period.
T
en thousand six
hundred years ago,
the city of Scranton
was buried under a mile
of ice, said Gene Moyer,
wood carver, science buff
and author of four books.
Currently exhibited at
The Anthracite Heritage
Museum at McDade Park,
Scranton, through August
19, are 50 pieces of
Moyers sculptures that
reflect and embrace his
fascination with biolog-
ical history and his talent
as a wood carver.
Ice Age Mammals is
the title of the exhibit,
although his collection of
works also includes the
evolution of mammals
that lead to the Ice Age,
showing the progression
of the mammals and
their life forms - that
have evolved or devel-
oped in response to their
changing environments.
There is not one Ice
Age, said the Clarks
Summit resident, who has
devoted countless hours
following his retirement
more than a decade ago,
to researching the Earths
geological periods and
whittling away at chunks
of exotic hardwood.
There were countless
numbers of Ice Ages in
the history of the earth.
Rest comfortably know-
ing that, according to
Moyer, We probably will
not see another one (Ice
Age) for 12,000 years.
The last Ice Age ended
10,600 years ago.
He said of his exhibit,
I always combine art
with science The thing
that makes me tick is that
I like art with science. By
looking at this exhibit,
you would learn that
there really is an Abo-
minable Snowman in the
form of a giant ape. You
would learn about how
the Mastodons
evolved
The exhibit, which fol-
lows a chronological or-
der and is arranged on
tables throughout the mu-
seum with accompanying
descriptions of the peri-
ods, covers 65 million
years of geological evolu-
tion, beginning with the
Megazostrodon of the
Early Jurassic period, and
culminating with carvings
of one of the great won-
ders of the natural world,
Niagara Falls, Western
New York State.
His sculptures are
etched out of black wal-
nut with literally thou-
sands of small indenta-
tions that affect the re-
flected and absorbed
properties of light in each
piece.
Moyer referred to his
textured style of sculpting
as a kind of pointillism
in wood. He added, All
of these pieces are carved
from black walnut. It
(black walnut) is my fa-
vorite, because its the
most beautiful wood.
The sculptor began
carving wood out of bore-
dom. I was on vacation
one day, and I had a piece
of wood in the garage. I
took it (the wood) outside
and as I was sitting on
the steps, I started scrap-
ing it against the edge of
the steps. I had no tools.
I did this beautiful little
sailboat and at the end of
the day I showed my
father, and he said,
How did you do
ABINGTON JOURNAL/
JOAN MEAD-MATSUI
Katarina Montoro, 11, Scranton
and her grandmother, Mary
Theresa Montoro, both of
Scranton, with sculptor Gene
Moyer.
Art education
Clarks Summit resident
combines sculpture, science
BY JOAN MEAD-MATSUI
Abington Journal Correspondent
See Educate, Page 11
What characters voice does Denis Leary play in "Ice Age: Continental Drift"?
C M Y K
WEDNESDAY, JULY18, 2012 THE ABINGTON JOURNALCLARKS SUMMIT, PA WWW.THEABINGTONJOURNAL.COM PAGE11A
CROSSWORD ANSWERS FROM PAGE 4
Arecent shipment of new
books to the Abington Commu-
nity Library included a treasure
trove of mysteries, some by
established authors of suspense
and others by newcomers just
joining their ranks. Look for or
put in a request for one or more
of the following:
Aunt Dimity and the Village
Witch, by Nancy Atherton. A
fragment of a family diary hints
that one of Mrs. Amelia This-
tles ancestors might have been
Mistress Meg, the Mad Witch
of Finch. Following a series of
cryptic clues hidden around the
sleepy village, Lori Shepherd
sets off to help Amelia discover
the truth. With Aunt Dimitys
otherworldly help, Lori inches
closer to the true story of Mis-
tress Meg --- and Amelia.
Burning Midnight: an Amos
Walker Novel, by Loren D.
Estleman. Walker, longtime
private investigator, is called on
to intervene when16-year-old
Ernesto Pasada, a member of
one of Detroits most powerful
Mexican gangs, the Maldados,
becomes involved in a feud
with a rival gang, the Zapatistas,
that has escalated into violence.
His instincts tell himthat some-
thing darker than gang enmity is
behind the havoc and that if he
doesnt find Ernesto soon, the
teenager may be a victimof the
violence.
Antiques Disposal, by Bar-
bara Allan. Brandy Borne and
her mother, Vivian, have the
winning bid on an abandoned
storage units mystery con-
tents, which they discover in-
cludes a vintage cornet, but
when they arrive to claimtheir
loot, the space is empty, except
for the recently stowed body of
Big JimBob, Vivians former
flame. Then an intruder breaks
into the Borne home and makes
off with the cornet, but why is
the horn worth killing for?
ABad Day for Mercy, by
Sophie Littlefield. Fifty-one
year old Stella Hardesty learns
that her step-nephew, Chip, has
been threatened with bodily
harmif he doesnt settle his
unpaid gambling debts, but
when she arrives at Chips home
in Wisconsin, she must confront
Chip and his girlfriend, Natalya,
about the man they insist was
already dead when they found
him. Suspicious, but compelled
to help family, Stella goes about
tracking down other suspects.
Hush Money, by Chuck
Greaves. When Hush Puppy,
Pasadena socialite Sydney Ev-
eretts champion showhorse,
dies under mysterious circum-
stances, junior lawyer Jack
McTaggart is assigned to han-
dle the insurance claim. The
case soon takes an unexpected
turn, however, thrusting Jack
into a spiraling web of black-
mail and murder in which he
finds himself both the prime
suspect and the next likely vic-
tim.
LIBRARY NEWS
BY MARY ANN MCGRATH
The Abington Community Library is
located at 1200 W. Grove St., Clarks
Summit. Visit our website,
www.lclshome.org/abington to regis-
ter online for events or call the
library at 570. 587.3440.
Dont have a library card? Register
for one at http://www.lclshome.org/
libraryinfo/library_card_reg.asp.
The Sculpted Ice Works
Factory Tour and Natural
Ice Harvesting Museum
offered a free snowcone
and donated $1fromeach
admission to the Lake Wal-
lenpaupack Watershed
Management District July
5.
Mark Crouthamel, owner
of Sculpted Ice Works, said,
We are proud to support
community organizations.
The Lake Wallenpaupack
Watershed Management
District works hard to keep
Lake Wallenpaupack clean
for everyone.
The LWWMDis a multi-
governmental, nonprofit
corporation that manages
the Lake Wallenpaupack
watershed and addresses
water quality problems.
Each year, Sculpted Ice
Works manufactures more
than12,000 crystal clear ice
carving blocks in their plant
and transforms theminto
ice sculptures of all sizes.
Crouthamel, master carver
and founder of Sculpted Ice
Works in1999, has spent
several years developing a
factory tour of the ice plant
and a museumto capture
the history of naturally
harvested ice, with a focus
on the Pocono region. Years
ago, harvesting lake ice in
the region was both a large
commercial industry as well
as done locally for farms
and families. The museum
will showcase local ice
harvesting tools, uses of ice
before refrigeration and
howice was delivered. En-
ter into the modern ice
plant, and watch howclear
ice is manufactured today.
Take a glimpse through the
windows into the freezer
and learn howice sculptures
are made in the Sculpted Ice
Works Factory Tour.
Open daily, summer
hours are Monday- Saturday
from10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and
Sundays from11a.m. to 4
p.m. Admission is $5 and
children under 3 are free.
Sculpted Ice Works is locat-
ed in Lakeville, on Route
590, between Hawley and
Hamlin.
Mark Crouthamel, owner of Sculpted Ice Works Factory Tour and Ice Harvest Museum, and Nick
Spinelli, executive director of Lake Wallenpaupack Watershed Management District, in front of the
water management system at the Sculpted Ice Works plant in Lakeville.
Ice, then and now
that? I said, I was scrap-
ing against the steps. He
said, You did what you
spent the whole day scrap-
ing the steps? Did you
damage the steps? But,
when it was finished, I
had this beautiful little
sailboat and it looked al-
most real, and I had done
it without any tools, said
Moyer.
I started doing Christ-
mas decorations for our
family Christmas tree-
carving harder wood
with a knife, I was able to
put in more details. And
from there, I said, Wait a
minute If I can do
Christmas decorations, I
can probably do real art-
work, real sculpture, and
that was the case. So I had
a hidden talent for sculp-
ture
His previous one-man
exhibits at the Anthracite
Museum include Amer-
ica: A Portrait of the Na-
tion in Wood, and Coal
and Water: Life Forms
from the Coal Age to the
Present. His books are
available for sale at the
museum.
On July 25, 10 a.m.,
Moyer will present a lec-
ture on the Ice Age Mam-
mals exhibit. Children will
be admitted for free and
Moyer will also offer a
free raffle of his art. More
information is available at
anthracitemuseum.org or
by calling 570.963.4804
EDUCATE
Continued from Page 10
she also works extensively
in collage art.
LaRussa said, I search
for an intensity of emotion
and depth through an explo-
ration of texture, unfolding
the many layers. I observe
the internal complexities
and intricacies within us, in
various surroundings and
cultures. My mind delves
into the beauty within dark-
nessthe mystery, the
chaos, dissection of frag-
ments, the raw edges we are
afraid to show.
West creates fanciful
sculptures from objects
found in everyday life, turn-
ing them every which
wayupside down, inside
out. His paintings with vi-
brantly- colored canvases
show worlds as alien as
they are familiar.
He studied in Rome in
2008 and worked with the
Museo de Moderna helping
install two Sol Lewitt wall
drawings the museum re-
cently had acquired. He has
been exhibiting in Scranton
for the past two years, and
his work can be found in
private collections in Tam-
pa, Honolulu, Green Bay
and Philadelphia. He re-
ceived his Bachelor of Fine
Art with a concentration in
sculpture from Kutztown
University in 2008.
MIXING
Continued from Page 10
turn a pile of recycled
household items into artis-
tic treasure. This form of
3-D collage really helps
kids develop their creativity
as they learn about the
environment and recycling.
Camp will be held Monday
through Friday, July 23
through July 27 from 4 to
5:30 p.m. Admission is
$60 for the week and all
materials will be provided.
And dont forget to mark
your calendars now for
Celebrate Our Summer at
the River in Tunkhannocks
Riverside Park. Join us on
Saturday, July 28 for live
music, nature activities for
all ages, mural painting,
yoga by the river, a River
Float, a zoo mobile and
more. For more informa-
tion, visit www.susquehan-
nariverday.com or call the
theater at 570.996.1500.
As you can see the Die-
trich is so much more than
the movies.
DIETRICH
Continued from Page 10
Electric City Repertory
Company presents No
Exit directed by Paul J.
Gallo. Shows will be held
July 13 to 22 at the Phoe-
nix Performing Arts Cen-
tre, 409 Main St., Duryea.
Friday and Saturday shows
are at 8 p.m. and Sunday
matinees are at 2 p.m.
Tickets are $12. Call 457-
3589 for reservations.
Shown are cast members of Electric City Repertory Companys No
Exit directed by Paul J. Gallo, from left: Margaret Cooney Walther as
Inez, Andrew Gruden as Garcin, Julia Rudolph as Estelle and Shaun
Pierre as the Valet.
No
EXIT
The Electric City
Trolley Museum
hosted ARTS En-
gage! Day July 11.
Artists and arts
organizations provid-
ed free art activities
for children through-
out the museum,
along with entertain-
ment provided by
juggler Rob Smith.
ABINGTON JOURNAL PHOTOS/DON MCGLYNN
Tara, Andre and Samuel James, of South Abington Twp.,
explore a trolley at the Electric City Trolley Museum during
ARTS Engage! Day
Jill McGurgan of Old Forge helps her daughter Keira at Kim
Metchos screen printing table.
Event
juggles
the arts
Above: Juggler
Rob Smith
performs at
ARTS Engage!
Day at the
Electric City
Trolley Mu-
seum.
Right: Kevin
Whelan, of
Scranton,
works on his
moon sponge
painting.
The Northeastern group of
the Pennsylvania Sierra Club
will present the film Vanish-
ing of the Bees July 27 at
7:30 p.m. at the Lackawanna
State Park Learning Center.
For several years, honey
bees have been mysteriously
disappearing all over the
world. Without them, trees
cant produce apples or near-
ly any other fruit and many
vegetables wont grow. Bee-
keepers believe there must be
reasons for the trend, but it
baffles scientists .
The film explores the dis-
appearance of the small yet
vital insect that helps farms
from around the United
States supply food to the
world.
Film buzz
C M Y K
PAGE 12A www.theabingtonjournal.com The Abington JournalClarks Summit, PA WEDNESDAY, JULY18, 2012
How well do you know the streets where you live? The
Abington Journal puts your powers of observation to the
test with our new contest, Pieces of the Abingtons. Every
other week within the paper, well feature a photograph of a
landmark, architectural structure or other local item in public
view in the Abingtons. Well ask you to submit a guess as to
where the photo was taken and what is featured in the photo.
Then well enter each correct answer in a drawing to win a
$10 gift certificate from Lynns Hallmark in Clarks Summit.
Well notify you if you win, and well print the winning
contestant and answer in an upcoming issue of The Abing-
ton Journal with the next contest photo.
Winner #127: John Marc Olevnik
Answer #127: "The Pit" at Abington Heights High
School
Pieces of the Abingtons
contest rules:
1. Identify correct location of Photo #128, above.
2. Submit your entry by contest deadline on Friday, July 27, 2012.
3. Entry must include the correct location and/or description of the Piece of the Abingtons
featured in the current weeks photo.
4. Entry should include your name, address, contact number (not for publication) and correct
answer and be sent to: The Abington Journal, 211S. State Street, Clarks Summit PA18411 or
news@theabingtonjournal.com
5. Contestants can only win once in a 90-day period.
Pieces of the Abingtons
Sponsored by:
ABINGTON JOURNAL/ELIZABETH BAUMEISTER
regularly to provide the commu-
nity with a sustainable and free
means to share edible goods.
In all of these big metropoli-
tan cities, people are coming
together and sharing, and build-
ing a sense of community. It
(food swapping) is sustainable,
free to participate and is a great
evening of swapping and shar-
ing. I dont want to travel to the
bigger cities to swap; I want to
bring food swapping to North-
eastern Pennsylvania. Its some-
thing I think the area needs and
will embrace, said Fleming,
who invited McClellan, author
of Food in Jars: Preserving in
Small Batches Year Round, and
one of the co-founders of the
Philadelphia swap group, to
visit Scranton to participate in
the event.
McClellan, a food blogger,
cookbook author and canning
teacher, is currently freelance
for Grid Philly, Serious Eats the
Food Network Blog, USATo-
day and Mrs. Wages, and shares
a passion for canning, preserv-
ing and food swapping.
The food swap movement is
a really great part of this sort of
canning and preserving explo-
sion, said McClellan, who
grewup in Southern California
and Oregon. We always had
fruit trees or berry bushes at the
homes I grewup in. When I was
26 or 27, I went blueberry pick-
ing one day with a friend and
came home with13 pounds of
blueberries and thought, Well,
what do I do with them?I
guess I need to make some
jam I called my momsix
times and went to the hardware
store to buy canning jars and
made my first batch of jam.
There was just something about
it that felt right to me. Canning
really felt like a good niche for
me. My momalways did some
canningwe made jams a
couple time a year, enough to
give to family and friends for the
holidays and have some to eat.
The author, who always want-
ed to write a cookbook, said,
Its something Ive wanted to
do for a very long time.
Her book offers an introduc-
tion to canning. All of the
batches are really small and the
yield is between three and four
pints. We dont need to can to
get through the winter anymore.
Its more about making little
things you really like or using up
produce fromyour back
yardthats what this book is
designed for
She added, I think my book
is a really great partner to food
swaps because there are a lot of
recipes that have a nice yield in
terms of things you can bring to
a food swap if you can themin
half pint or quarter pint jars. You
have some to keep; you have
some to give away.
For anyone who would like to
get started canning, McClellans
book is available online and at
Barnes &Noble and other inde-
pendent bookstores. Recipes
can be found at her website,
foodinjars.com.
In attendance at the event
were Fleming, McClellan, Don-
na Czarkowski, Lisa Burke,
Donna Gard-Lengner, Elaine
Waskovich, Westyn Hinchey,
Mark Bonfiglio, Barbara Torda,
Marie King and Joe Peters,
Scranton Cultural Center at the
Masonic Temple executive
director.
Czarkowski, owner of Cloe &
Company, located at 410 South
State St., Clarks Summit, one of
the participants, swapped sam-
ples of her Wedding Time Tea
for items such as simple syrup,
hummus and an Italian salad
and later said, Coming upon
the event, I wasnt expecting the
opportunity I had there. It was a
wonderful opportunity to meet
all of those people. The fellow-
ship is what is most important.
Howoften do you get to net-
work and have fellowship?
Peters said the Scranton Cul-
tural Center was thrilled to in-
troduce the venue to a unique
audience.
Hosting this food swapping
event at the Scranton Cultural
Center at The Masonic Temple
will bring awareness and access
to a world of people that may
not have known it existed other-
wise.
He shared what he described
as they benefits of food swap-
ping. Food swapping is fun, but
also economical. The econom-
ics are enhanced further when
swappers preserve their summer
vegetables and produce, and
then bring those out-of-season
goods to the winter swap. Food
swapping is so in-sync with
other concepts important to me
like sustainability, farm-to-table,
farmers markets, organics and
growing local, said Peters.
Fleming noted the next food
swap is planned for fall and she
has set up a Facebook page,
facebook.com/#!/NEPAswap-
pers, for anyone who would like
to get on board with the food
swapping network. Items
swapped are limited to hand-
made or hand grown. For the
fall swap, she said she expects to
see apples, pumpkin breads,
spiced muffins, soups, recipes
with the fall squashes and sum-
mer harvest produce that was
canned or preserved.
SWAPPING
Continued from Page 1
ABINGTON JOURNAL/JOAN MEAD-MATSUI
On July 11, cookbook author and
fellow swapper, Marisa McClellan,
was on hand at the food swap
event hosted by the Scranton
Cultural Center at The Masonic
Temple. Seated from left are
McClellan and Danielle Fleming,
swap event founder and organizer,
and Joe Peters, Scranton Cultural
Center at The Masonic Temple
executive director.
posed to smoking, she understands the ease
in which the habit is picked up and the
difficulty smokers face in trying to quit.
No one deserves to die
Sheila McDonough, of Olyphant, is
another strong advocate for the position
that no one deserves to die, which is also
the theme of a campaign run by the Lung
Cancer Alliance.
My grandmother died fromlung can-
cer, McDonough said via e-mail. Did she
smoke? Yes. My sister has lung cancer.
Does she smoke? No, never did. Does that
mean that my grandmother deserved to
die? No.
She said when her grandmother was
diagnosed, the family grieved, but was not
shocked. But when her sister, who had
never smoked and was still young, was
diagnosed it was different. It shook our
family to the core, she said.
This was when her son, Timmy Walsh,
then age six (now10), started the non-profit
fundraiser Camera For a Cure to raise mon-
ey for the Lung Cancer Alliance.
McDonough said she remembers sitting
one evening in the hospital waiting room
wondering if her sister was dying, not sure
howto answer her nieces many questions.
She said she couldnt imagine being in that
situation at such a young age, as it was
difficult enough as an adult.
But that is also a reason she said the new
Pa. chapter is so important. The Lung
Cancer Alliance is so much about helping
people cope, she said.
She pointed out when her sister was
diagnosed, it was an incidental finding,
meaning it was not what the doctors were
investigating. We need more awareness
and early detection. If we knewthat we are
higher at risk for lung cancer, maybe we
would have been more careful. Maybe we
would have been going to the doctor more
with our symptoms [both sisters have a
history of frequent bronchitis]. Maybe my
sister would have been diagnosed earlier,
instead of stage 3A. Maybe.
The needto do something positive
Another person whose life was shaken by
lung cancer is Rita Fenton, of Clarks Sum-
mit. She said her husband died of the dis-
ease three years ago, and just 11months
before that, she lost another dear friend to
the same.
Its tough to see a loved one go through
treatment, she said, adding that when it
was over, she found herself needing to do
something positive.
Fenton first heard about the Lung Cancer
Alliance through its annual candlelight
vigil, Shine the Light. The next year, she
said she decided to participate, and since
then, has been involved in various fundrais-
ers and events.
Of the newPa. chapter, she said, Its
important to bring it closer to our peo-
plespread the word as far as we can. I
think its kind of neat to have it right here.
She also expressed a desire to help others
going through the same thing she did, and
her advice to themis to do research, find a
positive outlet and knowthey are not alone.
Arscott said anyone interested in getting
involved in the newPa. Chapter of the Lung
Cancer Alliance is invited to its next meet-
ing, Aug. 8 at 6 p.m. at Anna Marias Res-
taurant, Dunmore. Questions can also be
directed to her at arscott@marywood.edu.
There are currently eight chapters nation-
ally, according to Kay Confrancesco, Direc-
tor of Advocacy Relations at Lung Cancer
Alliance, Washington D.C. The organiza-
tion began in1995 in Washington state and
moved to Washington D.C. in 2005. She
said most of its funding comes frompri-
vate, family, corporate and individual dona-
tions.
Confrancesco said the newchapter is
especially important because its based in
an area (NEPA) where a comprehensive
plan is needed. She expressed gratitude
toward the Arscotts for their direction,
saying they are the true faces of the dis-
ease, fromboth a personal and medical
standpoint.
Arscott said she has many hopes and
dreams for the future of the newchapter,
the biggest being to have a local lung can-
cer prevention, screening and treatment
center.
We need to help people, and we need to
help families as well, she said, adding that
because the disease doesnt leave many
survivors, there arent enough to raise a
voice alone.
SURVIVOR
Continued from Page 1
stream, Wylam said. If it does, it
will represent a completely new
set of mechanics for employers
and employees when it comes to
employment and benefits.
For employees who already have
been afforded the protections tied
to the early reform mandates, there
is a reality that sits behind the
individual mandate: if youre cov-
ered today, you do not have any-
thing to worry about.
If youre already enrolled in (or
enroll in) one of the plans offered
by your company, the penalty or
tax does not apply to you, Wylam
said. If you dont like that cov-
erage, how much it costs or
both, you likely will have more
options available to you that you
do not have today.
Wylam noted that the situation is
only going to get more complex
rather than easier.
She added that two realities will
come out of expanding choice for
health care consumers. The first is
that individuals will need help in
making their choices. Employers
will need to figure out if and how
they will go about providing this
help. Employers also have the abil-
been there, but employers havent
packaged the value that way be-
fore. Its daunting for employees to
look through multiple plans.
The biggest challenge for every-
one, according to Wylam, is know-
ing that new trails are being blazed
and the details on how to do so are
sketchy. The survey also revealed
that 62 percent of employers in-
dicated they are still trying to
wrap their heads around it.
ity to treat securing coverage more
like a retail experience. From the
employer, employees can get
health and other types of coverage,
including retirement benefits.
If the consumer has the option
to buy why not buy from the
employer? Wylam said. The
employer can offer convenience,
and its one -stop shopping for all
your health and welfare needs.
That message has really always
BILL
Continued from Page 1
The 2ndAnnual Motor-
cycle Ride tobenefit the
GriffinPondAnimal Shel-
ter inSouthAbington
Townshipwas heldJuly15.
Riders departedat noon
andreturnedtothe Shelter
for snacks after the ride.
ABINGTON JOURNAL PHOTOS/JESSIE FOX
Joe Caputo tests a few bikes before hitting the road July 15.
Jeanine and Jim Zielinski, Marissa Tomasovitch and Jerry
Tully gather before they start their ride on Sunday afternoon.
Bikers
donate
Throughout the summer, the mar-
ket hosts charitable events through a
partnership with the Abington Busi-
ness & Professional Association.
For example, last year the Voluntary
Action Center of NEPA partnered
with the market and the Abington
Community Library to collect books
for underprivileged children.
The Abington community was
extremely generous, she said. The
book drive yielded more than 100
donated books. This year the market
may host the book drive again, she
said.
SOUTH ABINGTON TWP.
The Abington Farmers Market pro-
vided locally-sourced food before it
was trendy, and this year is no ex-
ception.
The annual co-op, around for
nearly 20 years, will set up shop at
South Abington Community Park,
selling commodities ranging from
fresh produce to baked goods.
We really have all the bases cov-
ered, said Michelle LaCoe, spo-
kesperson for the market. Theres a
lot of variety. People can do a one-
stop shop.
Among the items available are
jams, flowers, sauces, eggs, baked
goods, honey, vegetables, maple
syrup, fruits, herbs and spices.
Each vendor focuses on a few
goods so that theres great variety
and quality, LaCoe said. One farmer
may have garlic but no dill while
another may have no garlic but an
abundance of dill. Each vendors
offerings seem to complement the
others, and thats where the variety
comes from, she said.
Abington area residents are al-
ready eager for the market to open,
according to LaCoe. She said she
recognizes the communitys support
for the market and speaks for all of
the vendors in expressing gratitude.
The Abington community has
been extremely supportive of the
farmers market. Were extremely
grateful.
The market is set to open July 21
at South Abington Community Park
from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. and will be
open each Saturday through the end
of October.
Farmers market a one-stop shop
BY GERARD E. NOLAN
Abington Journal Correspondent
C M Y K
SPORTS
Clarks Summit, Pa. JULY 18 TO JULY 24, 2012 50
This summer, high school
tennis players fromthe Abing-
ton area have the opportunityto
engage in friendly competition
in the 3rd Annual Bengt T.
Nelson High School Team
Tennis Tournament. The first
Bengt T. Nelson tournament
was organized in 2010 by Dr.
Anders Nelson, son of Bengt T.
Nelson, and the late Marianne
Nelson as a memorial tribute to
their father and husbandwho
loved the game and who played
regularly at the Waverly Com-
munity House.
The tournament is taking
place at Birchwood Tennis
Club, Scranton Tennis Club and
the Waverly Community
House. The format is two Boys
Singles, two Girls Singles, one
Boys Doubles, one Girls
Doubles and one Mixed Dou-
bles (played if tie after other six
matches). Matches will be10
game pro sets with a tiebreaker
played at 9 all. Teams are al-
lowed to practice with their
assigned teammembers and
coaches. Trophies will be
awarded to the winning team.
The schedule is as follows:
Friday, July 20: Birchwood
Tennis Club at Waverly Com-
munity House
Monday, July 23: Waverly
Community House at Scranton
Tennis Club
Friday, July 27: Scranton
Tennis at Birchwood Tennis
Club.
Matches at Birchwood Ten-
nis Club and Scranton Tennis
Club will begin at noon. Match-
es at Waverly Community
House begin at 9 a.m. In case of
rain, matches will be held at
Birchwood Tennis Club.
For details, call
570.586.8191, extension 2.
Memorial tennis tourney underway
Annual competition played in
the Abingtons honors Bengt
T. Nelson
K
eystone College inLa Plume
hosteda summer soccer camp
designedfor students ingrades
kindergartenthrough10at NedBoehm
FieldfromJuly9to13. The campcov-
eredthe basic skills of soccer andcamp-
ers were brokenintogroups basedon
age andability.
There will be another sessionof the
campJuly23to27from8:30a.m. to
4:30p.m. Registrationforms are avail-
able online at gokcgiants.com. The cost
is $195for the sessionwithlunchin-
cluded. For details, call 945.8248.
ABINGTON JOURNAL/JESSIE FOX
Goalie Chris Rosiak, 12, watches teammates as they fight for the ball during a game of World Cup July 13.
ABINGTON JOURNAL/JESSIE FOX
Alec Buttner, 12, celebrates after scoring a
goal during a game of World Cup.
ABINGTON JOURNAL/STEPHANIE ELKO
Gary Wroblesiki blocks the goal from
Henry Rusak at the Keystone Giants Soc-
cer Camp July 11.
ABINGTON JOURNAL/STEPHANIE ELKO
Ashley Mulherin and Justin Rowe pass the ball to one another at the Keystone Giants
Summer Soccer Camp July 11. Goalees: Chris Rosiak and Gary Wroblesiki
KICKIN It
The Scranton Lions Club
announced its sponsorship of
the oldest continuous high
school all-star football game in
the United Statesthe Dream
Game. This year will be the
78th year that the Scranton
Lions has organized the annual
DreamGame scheduled for
August 1at Scranton Memorial
Stadiumat 8 p.m.
The Scranton Lions Club
members are a fantastic group
of talented individuals that
make this fine tradition a suc-
cess year after year, said Karl
Pfeiffenberger, Club President.
The DreamGame is a county-
wide event that draws All-Star
football players fromlocal high
schools and is attended by ap-
proximately 6,000 fans each
year. This 78th anniversary of
this fine tradition is being met
with great expectations and
celebration said Nick Parise,
DreamGame Chairman.
For the past 78 years, the
Lions Club of Scranton has
been able to significantly help
the blind and the visually chal-
lenged of our community
through the proceeds of the
game. All proceeds will go to
the Lackawanna Country
Branch of the Pennsylvania
Association for the Blind.
This is a major annual reve-
nue streamthat is critical to
maintaining the Associations
Prevention of Blindness and
Sight Conservation Programs,
said Mary Lou Wascavich,
Executive Administrator of the
Lackawanna Country Branch of
the Pennsylvania Association
for the Blind.
Tickets for the game are $8.
Tickets and programbook ads
can be purchased by contacting
Karl Pfeiffenberger at
570.342.7711extension136 or
Mary Lou Wascavich at
570.342.7613.
The Scranton Lions Club recently met to plan for the 78th annual Dream Game, which kicks off at 8 p.m.
August 1. Front row, from left, Michelle Scaturro, Paula DePeters, Mary Lou Wascavich, Sharon A. Byrne.
Standing, from left, Joe Manley, John Mesko, Nick Parise, Dave Rudis, Karl Pfeiffenberger, Scott Hiller.
Dream Game organizers meet to plan all-star tilt
The 19th Annual Antique
Tractor Show, hosted by the
Endless Mountains Antique
Power Association was held
July 13 to 15 at Lazybrook
Park, Tunkhannock. The
weekends activities included
a parade and tractor pull.
Dalton residents Brad Seward Jr. and Justin Seward displayed their
tractors at the show.
ABINGTON JOURNAL PHOTOS/ALICE STUFFLE
John Deere tractors on display at the 19th Annual Antique Tractor Show
at Lazybrook Park, Tunkhannock.
A scarecrow at the Antique Tractor
Show in Tunkhannock.
TUNKHANNOCK TRADITION
Antique
showcase
The 4th Annual Lackawan-
na Trail Lion Cub Football
Camp was held July 17 and 18
on the game field at Lacka-
wanna Trail High School. The
camp was for kids ages 6 to
14.
Each camper received posi-
tion specific instruction from
the coaching staff and players
of the Lackawanna Trail High
School football team in a
non-contact setting.
All campers received coach-
ing on the funda-
mentals of
blocking
and tack-
ling, how to get into a solid
football stance, how to use
their power angles, stretch-
ing, agility, proper form run-
ning technique and teamwork.
The importance of Lion
Pride throughout the entire
Lackawanna Trail Football
family was also emphasized.
Former Tunkhannock Area
football coach Frank Berar-
delli, who was an offensive
guard at the University of
Delaware, served as the guest
speaker.
Approximately 45 campers
participated in the two-day
event.
Camp focus is
fundamentals
PHOTO COURTESY
ALICE STUFFLE
Lineman Justin
Barber shows
the right stance
to Alex Stec
during the
Lackawanna
Trail Football
camp.
C M Y K
PAGE 14A www.theabingtonjournal.com The Abington JournalClarks Summit, PA WEDNESDAY, JULY18, 2012
7
6
1
8
6
8
Abington Heights High
School rising sophomore Tyra
Abdalla won
the USTA
Girls16 Sin-
gles Desig-
nated Dela-
ware State
Junior Cham-
pionships June
20. Abdalla
won three
rounds, including a 6-2 6-1
victory over Ayesha Abdullah in
the final. The Dalton resident
attended the IMGBolletteri
Tennis Academy June 3, where
she was selected by a committee
to play in the Girls15 Singles
Nick Bollettieri Discovery
Open in Bradenton, Fla. repre-
senting the United States, play-
ing under ITFrules. She was
among 85 participants repre-
senting 20 countries. Abdalla
lost in a tiebreaker, 6-2 7-6, to
Valentina Vargas fromColum-
bia.
Abdalla finished her unde-
feated in singles in league play
at No. 3 singles, she also won a
fewmatches at No. 2 singles.
Abdalla teamed with Allie Pu-
sateri to reach the finals of the
District 2 doubles tournament.
Abdalla wins
junior title
Abdalla
The Andrew Kettel Bas-
ketball Camp was held
July 9 to 12 for girls and
boys in 5th through 9th
grades at Backcourt
Hoops, Scranton. The
camp covered shooting,
ball-handling and offensive
moves with Kettel, head
coach of the Lackawanna
Trail Jr./Sr. High School
basketball program.
ABINGTON JOURNAL/STEPHANIE ELKO
Coach Andrew Kettel instructs students Dmitri Gnall and Jordan Non at
the Andrew Kettel Basketball Camp July 12.
L.T. head coach teaches
offense to campers
The Waverly Community
House Camp Create, a summer
arts and theatre camp for chil-
dren with special needs, will
benefit from the proceeds of an
upcoming game of the NEPA
Miners football team. On July
21, the Miners will face the
Philadelphia Gators in their
fourth game of the season at 7
p.m. at Scranton Memorial
Stadium.
The Miners use the sport of
football as a vehicle to provide
year round community service
for this area. The Miners chose
Camp Create at the Waverly
Community House as one of
the charitable youth organiza-
tion it supports at each home
game.
The NEPA Miners are unde-
feated this season and have won
32 games in the last five sea-
sons. They were awarded Best
New Team on the East Coast
in 2007 by Minor League Foot-
ball News. Tickets for the game
are $10 for adults, $6 for mil-
itary personnel, seniors and
students and free to children
under 12 years of age.
Tickets are on sale in the
Waverly Community House
Office. Purchasing them for a
night of family fun is a way to
support Camp Create, which is
designed to engage children
with special needs. Participants
are taught to express themselves
creatively through art and dra-
ma, beneficial for children with
speech and communication
challenges. The camp also helps
children develop socialization
skills and allows them to gain
confidence and independence.
Camp Create, now in its sixth
year, is open to children ages 6
to 12 (or children of equivalent
abilities). Camp Create will be
offered the weeks of August 6
and 13. To learn morecall
570.586.8191, extension 2.
Miners team
up with
Camp Create
Joe Lukas, a Glenburn
resident, along with team
members George Oustrich,
Rob Lukas and Tim Ous-
trich recently won the 9th
annual Moosic Youth Cen-
ter Golf Tournament held
at Pine Hills Country Club
in Taylor. Their score was
14 under par, 57.
The tournament is a fun-
draiser for the Moosic
Youth Center, a non-profit
organization that hosts
events for the community
youth and senior citizens.
Joe Lukas, Glenburn resident, along with team members George Ous-
trich, Rob Lukas and Tim Oustrich recently won the 9th annual Moosic
Youth Center Golf Tournament at Pine Hills Country Club in Taylor. Their
score was 14 under par, at 57. Shown from left, are: George Oustrich,
Rob Lukas, Joe Lukas, Glenburn, Kathy Taylor, event organizer, Tim
Oustrich.
Glenburn golfer part of
winning team at tourney
While many other little
league programs in Northeast
Pa. struggle with participation,
the Abington Little League has
remained strong. According to
the league, one of the reasons
is the continued commitment
to improving the facilities for
the players, parents and specta-
tors. Previously, the league had
provided opportunities for
children to play at all levels
fromT-Ball all the way
through Senior League. This
year, the league expanded
further when it added a Big
League team. The Big
League division of little
league is for boys16-18 years
old who want to continue to
play baseball. The first -year
Big League teamhad tremen-
dous success as it traveled
throughout Northeast Pa.
facing teams fromLackawan-
na and Wayne Counties.
The core of this teamis a
group of seniors fromAbing-
ton Heights High School who
wanted to finish their baseball
season on a positive note. The
roster also included several
athletes fromthe Abingtons
who either played for other
high schools or had played on
other sports teams in high
school. There are also several
players fromthe Christy Math-
ewson league who joined the
team, as they had no program
available to them.
Throughout the regular
season and the playoffs every-
one contributed to this team
effort as the squad finished an
undefeated regular season.
The Big League team, the
Abington Sportsmens Club,
wonthe District title bysweep-
ing the West Scranton teamin
two straight games.
Abington opened the best of
three championship series with
a 6-0 victory over West Scran-
ton. Abington jumped out to a
quick lead in the first inning on
a two run single by Josh Slo-
cum. Inthe fifthinning, ag-
gressive base-running by John
Vassil helped set the table for
four more runs; with the key
hit coming fromKyle Yahn.
Bill McDermott, Josh Slocum,
and Robbie Ayre all had two
hits for Abington. Jason Sub-
asic got the game win for
Abington, striking out seven
and allowing only three hits.
In game two, Robbie Ayre
pitched six innings while only
allowing two runs on five hits.
As they did in game one, the
Abington bats came alive early
and allowed themto score
three runs in the first inning
highlighted by Mason Meckes
two run double. Abington
added single runs in the fourth
and sixth innings on a triple by
Neil Hawk and a double by
Jason Subasic.
Abington finished third in
the State Big League Tourna-
ment held at Mansfield Uni-
versity. They defeated a Dis-
trict 12 team, 6-1, in the first
game. In their second game,
they defeated the teamfrom
District 27, 7-6. They suffered
their first loss to a Philadelphia
teamfromDistrict 28 in the
winners bracket final, 15-5.
The Sportsmen were eliminat-
ed fromthe tournament in
their next game by the eventual
champion fromDistrict 12.
Shown are, first row, from left: Jerry Burke, Bill McDermott, Jason Subasic, Robbie Ayre, Neil Hawk,
and Josh Slocum. Second row: Frank Subasic (coach), Kyle Yahn, Kyle Arnold, Neil Hawk (coach), John
Vassil, Mason Mecke, Andrew Gorczyk, Connor Pacyna and Bill McDermott (coach)
Abington wins Big
League district title
WEDNESDAY JULY 18, 2012 Abington Journal PAGE 15
100 Announcements
200 Auctions
300 Personal Services
400 Automotive
500 Employment
600 Financial
700 Merchandise
800 Pets & Animals
900 Real Estate
1000 Service Directory
MARKETPLACE
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PAGE 16 Abington Journal WEDNESDAY JULY 18, 2012
250 General Auction 250 General Auction
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
CONTENTS
AUCTION
FORMER COAL BARON RESIDENCE
The Von Storch Home
1740 N MAIN AVE.,
SCRANTON, PA 18508
Full of: Fabulous Antiques, Exquisite
Furnishings, Collectibles, Unique Built-in
Features, Oak and Marble Fireplace
Surrounds,Architectural Moldings &
Woodwork, Chandeliers, Mahogany
Staircase, Book Cases, Household Items.
Scrap Iron.
Everything sells regardless of price!!!
WE ARE SELLING EVERYTHING
INSIDE, INCLUDING THE INSIDE!!!!
TWO DAYAUCTION
FRI., JULY 20TH 5:30 PM 9:00PM
SAT., JULY 21ST 11:00AM 3:00PM
This is an Old Fashioned Summer Time
Auction on the Front Lawn
EVERYTHING SELLS
REGARDLESS OF PRICE
Cash, Credit Card or Good PA Check with ID.
Preview:
www.cowleyone.com
Cowley Auction Company
(570) 344-9411
RY 000121L
Bennett Infniti of Wilkes-Barre treats the needs of each individual customer with
paramount concern. We know that you have high expectation, and as a car dealer we
enjoy the challenge of meeting and exceeding those standards each and every time.
Allow us to demonstrate our commitment to excellence!
Our experienced sales staf is eager to share its knowledge and enthusiasm with you.
We encourage you to browse our online inventory, schedule a test drive and investigate
fnancing options. You can also request more information about a vehicle using our
online form or by calling 570-822-9900.
At Bennett Infniti of Wilkes-Barre, our highly qualifed technicians are here to provide
exceptional service in a timely manner. From oil changes to transmission replacements,
we are dedicated to maintaining top tier customer service, for both new and pre-owned
car buyers! Allow out staf to demonstrate our commitment to excellence.
Bennett Infniti of Wilkes-Barre
1060 Highway 315, Wilkes-Barre, PA
570-822-9900
www.infnitiofwilkesbarre.com
Lease the 2012 Infniti G25x for
$249/month for 18 months*
Lease the 2012 Infniti G25x for
* $1,799 INITIAL PAYMENT REQUIRED AT CONSUMMATION (INCLUDES $1,550 CONSUMER DOWN PAYMENT, $249 FIRST MONTH PAYMENT).
2012 G25 Journey RWD with Moonroof subject to availability to well qualified customers who lease through Nissan-Infiniti LT. Subject to Credit
Approval. MSRP $37,795 incl. destination charge. Net capitalized cost of $34,029 includes a $700 non-refundable acquisition fee. Retailer contribution
may affect actual price set by Retailer. Monthly payments total $4,482. At lease end, purchase for $29,858.05, plus $300 purchase option fee (except
KS & WI) plus tax or pay excess wear and tear plus $0.25 per mile for mileage over 10,000 miles per year. Lessee is responsible for maintenance and
repairs. No security deposit required. See participating retailer for details. (2 or more vehicles available). Offer ends 07/31/2012.
100
ANNOUNCEMENTS
110 Lost
BEST PRICES
IN THE AREA
CA$H ON THE $POT,
Free Anytime
Pickup
570-301-3602
570-301-3602
CALL US!
TO JUNK
YOUR CAR
BUYING
USED
VEHICLES
Call
Vitos & Ginos
949 Wyoming Ave,
Forty Fort, PA
288-8995
135 Legals/
Public Notices
LEGAL NOTICES
The Abington
Journal is a
newspaper of
general circula-
tion and meets
the require-
ments by
Newspaper
Advertising Act
45 Pa.C.S.A.
Section 301.
DEADLINE:
Mondays at 4 pm
for current week
Deadline varies
during holiday
weeks
RATE:
$1.00 line/$12.
per inch
For information or
questions
regarding legal
notices
you may call
Marti Peznowski
570-970-7371
or email to:
mpeznowski@
timesleader.com
or fax to
570-831-7312
or mail to
The Times Leader
15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE OF
FORMATION
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN THAT Certifi-
cation of Organiza-
tion for 211 Birch
Street, LLC was
filed and accepted
by the Common-
wealth of Pennsyl-
vania, Department
of State on July 6,
2012 in accordance
with the provisions
of the Pennsylvania
Limited Liability
Company Law of
1994, 15 Pa. C.S.A.
Section 8901 as
amended.
Patrick J. Lavelle,
Esquire
ARTICLES OF
INCORPORATION
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN THAT Articles
of Incorporation for
WINNERS CHOICE,
INC., were filed with
the Department of
State of the Com-
monwealth of Penn-
sylvania on July 9,
2012 in accordance
with the provisions
of the Business Cor-
poration Law of
December 21, 1988,
P.L 1444, Number
177, as amended
and supplemented.
HUGHES, NICHOLS
& OHARA W. BOYD
HUGHES, ESQUIRE
ATTORNEY.
LEGAL NOTICE
1994 Chevrolet
Cheyenne 2500
7,200 GVW, 4 Wheel
Drive 47,000 miles
7.5 Western power
angle snow plow.
Condition: AS IS.
Accepting written
offers until 1pm,
Wednesday, August
8, 2012 All written
offers must be in
sealed envelopes
marked PICKUP
TRUCK Equipment
can be viewed by
appointment (570-
587-2830) Minimum
offer $600. Truck &
Plow will be sold to
the highest offer.
Payment by
Cashiers Check or
Money Order only
Donald Snyder,
Chairman Mail
offers to: Abington
Regional Waste-
water Authority P.O
Box 199 Chinchilla,
PA 18410-0199
ESTATE NOTICE
In Re; Gladys K.
Davis, Deceased,
late of the City of
Scranton, County of
Lackawanna and
Commonwealth of
Pennsylvania, Let-
ters Testamentary
have been granted
in the above estate
to Susan J. Clark.
All persons having
claims or demands
against the dece-
dent shall make
them known and
present them, and
all persons indebt-
ed to said decedent
shall make payment
thereof, without
delay, to Susan J.
Clark, Executrix, or
Robert A. Cecchini,
Attorney for the
Estate, 102 East
Drinker Street, Dun-
more, Pennsylvania
18512
Robert A. Cecchini,
Esquire
135 Legals/
Public Notices
ESTATE NOTICE
IN RE: ELIZABETH
RUBAY, deceased,
late of the City of
Scranton, Lack-
awanna County,
Pennsylvania, (Sep-
tember 28, 2012).
Notice is hereby
given that Letters
Testamentary on
the above estate
have been granted
to Marlene Stanilka.
All persons indebted
to the said estate
are required to
make payment and
those having claims
to present the same
without delay to the
Administrator
named above or to
James M. Tressler,
Esquire, Tressler
Law, LLC, 220 Penn
Avenue, 3rd Floor,
Scranton, PA 18503
TRESSLER LAW,
LLC
JAMES M.
TRESSLER,
ESQUIRE
LEGAL NOTICE
ARTICLES OF
INCORPORATION
NOTICE IS HERE-
BY GIVEN THAT
Articles of Incorpo-
ration for Gravel
Pond Townhous-
es, Inc., were filed
and accepted by
the Commonwealth
of Pennsylvania,
Department of
State on July 6,
2012 in accordance
with the provisions
of the Pennsylvania
Business Law of
December 21, 1988,
P.L. 1444, Number
177, as amended
and supplemented
Patrick J. Lavelle,
Esquire
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
LEGAL NOTICE
ESTATE OF
ROBERT W.
KEMP,
DECEASED, late of
Dalton, Lackawanna
County, Pennsylva-
nia. Letters Testa-
mentary in the
above having been
granted, all persons
having claims or
demands against
the Estate of the
decedent shall
make them known
and present them,
and all persons
indebted to said
decedent shall
make payment
thereof,
without delay, to
Kyle R. Kemp, 1127
Stafford Avenue,
Scranton, PA,
18505 or Attorney
Stephen J. Evers,
213 R. North State
Street, Clarks Sum-
mit, PA., 18411.
Stephen J. Evers
Attorney for the
Estate
ESTATE NOTICE
ESTATE OF
EDWARD J.
KOZLOSKI, late of
the City of Scranton
died June 17, 2012,
Executor, Robert P.
Kozloski, Terrence
V. Gallagher, Attor-
ney for the Estate,
c/o 416 Jefferson
Avenue, Scranton,
PA 18510. Notice is
hereby given that
Letters of Testa-
mentary have been
granted. All persons
indebted to the said
estate are required
to make payment
and those having
claims or demands
are to present the
same without delay
to the Executrix
named.
LEGAL NOTICE
Estate of Marie L.
Polaski, late of Old
Forge Lackawanna
County, PA, died
May 3, 2012, Letters
Administration
granted, all persons
having claims
against said Estate,
shall make them
known, present
them and all indebt-
ed to decedent shall
make immediate
payment to Joseph
J. Polaski, Jr.,
Administrator, 301
Milwaukee Avenue,
Old Forge, PA 18518
or to Joseph E. Mar-
iotti, Esquire, 730
Main Street,
Moosic, PA 18507.
NOTICE OF
GRANT OF
LETTERS OF
ADMINISTRA-
TION
Estate of Donald
Pukita, late of
Scranton, Pennsyl-
vania (died April 10,
2012). Administrator
is Cheryl Mecca,
4044 SR 2009, Hop
Bottom, PA 18824.
Attorney for the
Estate is Nancy M.
Barrasse, Esquire,
639 Jefferson
Avenue, Scranton,
Pennsylvania 18510
ESTATE NOTICE
Estate of Rose
Marie Burge, late of
the City of Scranton,
Lackawanna Coun-
ty, Pennsylvania,
(died October 2,
2011). Notice is
hereby given that
Letters Testamen-
tary on the above
Estate have been
issued to Mary
Pierre, Executrix of
the Estate. All per-
sons indebted to
said Estate are
required to make
payment and those
having claims or
demands to present
the same without
delay to the Admin-
istrator or to:
Guy N. Valvano Esq.
452 E. Drinker St.
Dunmore, Pa 18512
Attorney for the
Estate
135 Legals/
Public Notices
LEGAL NOTICE
RE: Estate of Fred
R. Studer, late of
South Abington
Township, Pennsyl-
vania. Letters Tes-
tamentary in the
above estate having
been granted, cred-
itors shall make
demand and
debtors shall make
payment to Lau-
rence A. Wilson and
Laurie L. Graham,
478 Round Hill
Road, Clifford Town-
ship, PA 18470; Co-
Executors or to Paul
D. Horger, Esquire,
Oliver, Price &
Rhodes, Attorneys
for the Estate, 1212
South Abington
Road, P.O. Box 240,
Clarks Summit, PA
18411.
150 Special Notices
A loving couple
wishes to adopt
their 1st child,
our home is filled
of love and
wonderful
opportunities for
your baby!
Expenses paid.
Liz/Anthony
1-800-359-6937
LizAnthonyAdopt.com
ADOPT: A lifetime
of endless love.
Secure future
awaits your new-
born. EXPENSES
PAID. Kim & Tim
800-407-4318
ADOPTION
A baby is our dream!
We are a happily
married couple who
long to provide your
baby with a lifetime
of happiness, edu-
cational opportuni-
ties & close extend-
ed family. Expenses
paid. Call
1-888-370-9550 or
www.SusanAnd
BruceAdopt.com
ADOPTION
A financially secure
married couple
embraces the
chance to adopt.
We promise a won-
derful life for your
baby. A loving family
and endless oppor-
tunities await. All
Expenses paid.
Patti/Dan. Toll Free
1-855-692-2291
WERE YOU
IMPLANTED WITH A
ST. JUDE RIATA
DEFIBRILLATOR
LEAD WIRE
between June 2001
and December
2010? Have you had
this lead replaced,
capped, or did you
receive shocks from
the lead? You may
be entitled to com-
pensation. Contact
Attorney Charles
Johnson 1-800-535-
5727
Find Something?
Lose Something?
Get it back where it
belongs
with a Lost/Found ad!
570-829-7130
BUYING BUYING
JUNK
VEHICLES &
Heavy
Equipment
NOBODY PAYS MORE! NOBODY PAYS MORE!
HAPPY TRAILS
TRUCK SALES
570-760-2035
570-542-2277
6am to 9pm
310 Attorney
Services
B A N K R U P T C Y
DUI - ARD
SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY BENEFITS
WORKERS COMP
Free Consultation
25+ Years Exp.
Joseph M.
Blazosek
570-655-4410
570-822-9556
blazoseklaw.com
Free Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans.
Carol Baltimore
570-822-1959
SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY
Free Consultation.
Contact Atty. Sherry
Dalessandro
570-823-9006
360 Instruction &
Training
EARN COLLEGE
DEGREE ONLINE.
*Medical, *Business,
*Criminal Justice.
Job placement
assistance. Com-
puter available.
Financial Aid if quali-
fied. SCHEV Certi-
fied. Call 888-220-
3984. www.Centu-
raOnline.com
HIGH SCHOOL
DIPLOMA FROM
HOME. 6-8 weeks.
ACCREDITED. Get a
Diploma. Get a Job!
FREE Brochure. 1-
800-264-8330 Ben-
jamin Franklin High
School www.diplo-
mafromhome.com
406 ATVs/Dune
Buggies
HAWK 2011 UTILITY ATV
NEW!! Full size
adult ATV. Strong 4
stroke motor. CVT
fully automatic
transmission with
reverse. Electric
start. Front & rear
luggage racks.
Long travel suspen-
sion. Disc brakes.
Dual stage head
lights. Perfect for
hunters & trail rid-
ers alike. BRAND NEW
& READY TO RIDE.
$1,995 takes it
away.
570-817-2952
Wilkes-Barre
TOMAHAWK`11
ATV, 110 CC. Brand
New Tomahawk
Kids Quad. Only
$695 takes it away!
570-817-2952
Wilkes-Barre
409 Autos under
$5000
FORD 1998
CROWN VICTORIA
P71 UNMARKED
POLICE CAR,
118,000 miles, blue
with grey cloth
interior & carpets.
Runs excellent.
Asking $2,000
Call 570-881-4127
FORD 95 F150
4x4. 1 Owner. 91K.
4.8 engine, auto.
Runs great. New
paint, stake body
with metal floor.
570-675-5046.
Leave message,
will return call.
$4990.
GRAND MARQUIS
99 GS
Well maintained,
Smooth riding,
4.6L, V8, RWD,
Auto, Power
windows, power
locks, New
Inspection,
Serviced,
Silver over blue.
Good tires
$3,750
Call 823-4008
412 Autos for Sale
BUICK 02 CENTURY
Ltd. V6. Tan. Auto,
ABS, Leather. 99K
miles. $3700.
570-371-8607
DODGE 02
VIPER GTS
10,000 MILES V10
6speed, collec-
tors, this baby is
1 of only 750 GTS
coupes built in
2002 and only 1 of
83 painted Race
Yellow it still wears
its original tires
showing how it
was babied. This
car is spotless
throughout and is
ready for its new
home. This vehicle
is shown by
appointment only.
$39,999 or trade.
570-760-2365
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
FORD `07 FOCUS
SES Sedan
Alloy wheels, heat-
ed seats, CD play-
er, rear spoiler, 1
owner, auto, air, all
power, great gas
mileage, priced to
be sold immedi-
ately! $6,995 or
best offer.
570-614-8925
PORSCHE `01
BOXSTER S
38,500 miles. Black
with beige interior. 6
speed transmission.
Air & CD player.
Excellent condition.
$17,200. Call
570-868-0310
412 Autos for Sale
TOYOTA 04 CELICA GT
112K miles. Blue,
5 speed. Air,
power
windows/locks,
CD/cassette, Key-
less entry, sun-
roof, new battery.
Car drives and
has current PA
inspection. Slight
rust on corner of
passenger door.
Clutch slips on
hard acceleration.
This is why its
thousands less
than Blue Book
value. $6,500
OBO. Make an
offer! Call
570-592-1629
VW 10 JETTA
15,900 miles, stan-
dard transmission.
Garage kept, white
with sunroof. $15K
570-387-8639
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
CHEVY 30 HOTROD COUPE
$47,000
FORD 76 THUNDERBIRD
All original.
JUST REDUCED
$9,000
MERCEDES 29
Kit Car $5,500
(570) 655-4884
hell-of-adeal.com
MAZDA `88 RX-7
CONVERTIBLE
1 owner, garage
kept, 65k original
miles, black with
grey leather interior,
all original & never
seen snow. $7,995.
Call 570-237-5119
MERCURY `79
ZEPHYR
6 cylinder
automatic.
52k original miles.
$1500.
570-899-1896
421 Boats &
Marinas
FISHING BOAT.
Like new. 16 1/2
Trophy Fiberglass.
25 HP Johnson
motor, 48 lb
thrust, trolling
motor with foot
control. Recharg-
er, pedestal front
seat, carpeted
floor. Live well,
storage compart-
ment. Excellent
condition. $4500.
570-675-5046
after 12 noon
427 Commercial
Trucks &
Equipment
CHEVY 08 3500
HD DUMP TRUCK
2WD, automatic.
Only 12,000 miles.
Vehicle in like
new condition.
$19,000.
570-288-4322
439 Motorcycles
12 BRAND NEW
SCOOTER
All ready to ride,
electric start, auto-
matic transmission,
disk brakes, rear
luggage trunk,
under seat storage,
around 100 mpg,
fully street legal, all
ready to go! only
$1,595. Call
570-817-2952
BMW 2010 K1300S
Only 460 miles! Has
all bells & whistles.
Heated grips, 12 volt
outlet, traction con-
trol, ride adjustment
on the fly. Black with
lite gray and red
trim. comes with
BMW cover, battery
tender, black blue
tooth helmet with
FM stereo and black
leather riding gloves
(like new). paid
$20,500. Sell for
$15,000 FIRM.
Call 570-262-0914
Leave message.
HARLEY 10 DAVIDSON
SPORTSTER CUSTOM
Loud pipes.
Near Mint
174 miles - yes,
One hundred and
seventy four
miles on the
clock, original
owner. $8000.
570-876-2816
HARLEY DAVIDSON 80
Soft riding FLH.
King of the High-
way! Mint origi-
nal antique show
winner. Factory
spot lights, wide
white tires,
biggest Harley
built. Only
28,000 original
miles! Never
needs inspec-
tion, permanent
registration.
$7,995 OBO
570-905-9348
439 Motorcycles
SUZUKI 01 VS 800
GL INTRUDER
Garage kept, no
rust, lots of
chrome, black with
teal green flake.
Includes storage
jack & 2 helmets.
$3600
570-410-1026
YAMAHA 97
ROYALSTAR 1300
12,000 miles. With
windshield. Runs
excellent. Many
extras including
gunfighter seat,
leather bags, extra
pipes. New tires &
battery. Asking
$4,000 firm.
(570) 814-1548
442 RVs & Campers
FOREST RIVER`08
5TH WHEEL
Model 8526RLS
Mountain Top,PA
$18,500
570-760-6341
SOUTHWIND `93
30 fully equipped
RV. Nice condition.
Sleeps 6. At Camp-
ground with lake
rights. $13,495
Negotiable. Call
570-379-2102
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
FORD 02 EXPLORER
Red, XLT, Original
non-smoking owner,
garaged, synthetic
oil since new, excel-
lent in and out. New
tires and battery.
90,000 miles.
$7,500
(570) 403-3016
FORD 73 F350
Stake Body Truck
55,000 Original
miles - garage
kept, only 2 own-
ers, hydraulic lift
gate, new tires,
battery and brakes.
Excellent condition.
No rust. Must see.
$6500 or best offer
Call 570-687-6177
MITSUBISHI `11
OUTLANDER SPORT SE
AWD, Black interi-
or/exterior, start/
stop engine with
keyless entry, heat-
ed seats, 18 alloy
wheels, many extra
features. Only Low
Miles. 10 year,
100,000 mile war-
ranty. $22,500. Will-
ing to negotiate.
Serious inquires
only - must sell,
going to law school.
(570) 793-6844
460
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
468 Auto Parts
All Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
503 Accounting/
Finance
FINANCIAL PLANNING
ASSISTANT
Established financial
advisory practice in
the Wilkes Barre
area has opening
for Planning Assis-
tant. College
degree, series 7
licensed, experi-
ence working in a
client service envi-
ronment. Must be
able to communi-
cate with clients,
detail oriented,
strong math and
computer skills.
SEND RESUME TO:
MBAMP27@GMAIL.COM
503 Accounting/
Finance
AUTOMOTIVE
CLERICAL POSITION
Automotive experi-
ence preferred.
This full time clerical
position requires
basic cost account-
ing and computer
knowledge. The
clerk will be involved
in all aspects of
dealership account-
ing and office rou-
tine including but
not limited to daily
receipts, check
writing, data entry
with ADP software,
working with sched-
ules, Accts Rec/Pay,
finalizing vehicle
sales and month-
end routines. Hours
are from 8 am until
4:30 pm, Mon-Fri.
Position Includes
benefits.
Stop by
TUNKHANNOCK AUTO
MART located at Rt
29 S. Tunkhannock
to fill out an appli-
cation. Or email
resume to:
automart@epix.net
Attention
Chris Donaldson
No phone calls.
509 Building/
Construction/
Skilled Trades
CAN YOU DIG IT?
HEAVY EQUIPMENT
SCHOOL. 3 week
training program.
backhoes, bulldoz-
ers, excavators.
Local job placement
assistance VA Ben-
efits Approved. 2
National Certifica-
tions. 866-362-6497
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
AIRLINE CAREERS :
Begin here-Become
an Aviation Mainte-
nance Tech. FAA
approved training.
Financial aid if quali-
fied-Housing avail-
able. Job placement
assistance.
CALL Aviation Insti-
tute of Maintenance
888-834-9715
542 Logistics/
Transportation
DRIVERS- A. Duie
Pyle Needs Owner
Operators & Com-
pany Drivers.
Regional Truckload
Operations. HOME
EVERY WEEKEND!
O/O Average
$1.84/Miles. Steady,
Year-Round Work.
Requires CDL-A, 2
Years Experience.
Call Dan: 877-910-
7711 www.DriveFor-
Pyle.com
DRIVERS: ATTEN-
TION CDL-A Drivers!
Averitt is Hiring in
Your Area. Great
Benefits & Home-
time. 4-Months T/T
Experience
Required- Apply
Now! 888-362-8608
Visit AVERITTca-
reers.com Equal
Opportunity Employ-
er
DRIVERS: CRST
offers the best
Lease Purchase
Program *SIGN ON
BONUS *No down
payment or credit
check *Great Pay
*Class A CDL
required *Owner
Operators Welcome
Call: 866-403-7044
Experienced Reefer
Drivers: GREAT PAY
/Freight lanes from
Presque Isle, ME,
Boston-Lehigh, PA.
800-277-0212 or
primeinc.com
542 Logistics/
Transportation
Drivers:
CDL-A TRUCK DRI-
VERS NEEDED!
*MILES *EQUIP-
MENT *BENEFITS
Hazmat Teams Start
at $.50/mile. Solo
Drivers Also Need-
ed! 800-942-2104
Ext. 7308 or 7307
WWW.DRIVE4TOTAL.COM
Wanna make a
speedy sale? Place
your ad today 570-
829-7130.
Drivers - Choose
your hometime from
Weekly, 7/ON-
7/OFF, 14/ON-7/OFF,
Full or Part-time.
Daily Pay! Top
Equipment!
Requires 3 months
recent experience.
800-414-9569
www.driveknight.com
CLASS A DRIVERS:
Regional Up to 42
CPM. Weekly Pay,
Benefits, Home
Time, Sign ON
BONUS, Paid Orien-
tation. 2 Years T/T
EXPERIENCE.
800-524-5051. www.
gomcilvaine.com
DRIVERS: Were a
Drivers Company
thats focused on
drivers. Solos .437
& Teams .513 1 year
OTR Experience
CDL-A-HazMat.
Solos $2000, Teams
$7500 Sign-On.
877-628-3748
WEDNESDAY JULY 18, 2012 Abington Journal PAGE 17
Style, Class, Excellence
MOTORWORLD DRIVE, JUST OFF INTERSTATE 81, WILKES-BARRE
SALES HOURS: MONDAY - FRIDAY: 9AM-8PM SATURDAY: 9AM-5PM
SUNDAY: OPEN FOR OUTDOOR BROWSING NOON - 5PM
WWW.MOTORWORLDGROUP.COM
North Eastern Pennsylvanias y
#1 Luxury Vehicle Destination
*ALL OFFERS SUBJECT TO MANUFACTURER CHANGES. PRIOR SALES EXCLUDED. FINANCING ON SELECT MODELS WITH APPROVED CREDIT. 0.9%
APR FINANCING FOR 36 MONTHS = $28.18/$1,000 FINANCED. 1.9% APR FINANCING FOR 60 MONTHS = $17.50/$1,000 FINANCED.
PHOTOS ARE FOR DISPLAY PURPOSES ONLY. DEALER NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS. PAYMENTS INCLUDE ALL REBATES AND
INCENTIVES. SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. ALL OFFERS EXPIRE 7/31/12.
www.motorworldacura.com
T W E N T Y F I F T H
A N N I V E R S A R Y
1.9% APR
fnancing for 37 to 60 mos.
ON ALL NEW 2012
ACURA MODELS*
0.9% APR
fnancing for 24 to 36 mos.
*LEASE PLUS TAX, TAGS, TITLE AND $129 PROCESSING FEE WITH 36 MONTHLY PAYMENTS
AT 10K MILES PER YEAR WITH $999 DOWN PAYMENT PLUS FIRST MONTHS PAYMENT.
GAP INSURANCE INCLUDED. RESIDUAL $24,836.40.
*L
AT
GA
NEW 2012 ACURA
MMMMMMMMDDDDDDDDXXXXXXXX
SH-AWD
MODEL# UA8F2CJW
$
439
LEASE
FOR
PLUS TAX & TAGS FOR 36 MONTHS*
- 6CL I VTECH ENGINE
- 6 SPEED AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION
WITH GRADE LOGIC
- LEATHER INTERIOR
- POWER MOONROOF
- BLUETOOTH
- VEHICLE STABILITY ASSIST
- ADVANCED COMPATIBILITY
ENGINEERING
0.9
% APR FINANCING
FOR 24 TO 60 MONTHS*
*LEASE PLUS TAX, TAGS, TITLE AND $129 PROCESSING FEE WITH 36 MONTHLY PAYMENTS
AT 10K MILES PER YEAR WITH $999 DOWN PAYMENT PLUS FIRST MONTHS PAYMENT.
GAP INSURANCE INCLUDED. RESIDUAL $18,233.95.
*L
AT
GA
NEW 2012 ACURA
TTTTTTTTSSSSSSSSXXXXXXXX
5-SPEED AUTO
MODEL# CU2F4CJW
$
299
LEASE
FOR
PLUS TAX & TAGS FOR 36 MONTHS*
- 201HP I VTECH ENGINE
- 5 SPEED AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION
WITH GRADE LOGIC
- LEATHER INTERIOR
- POWER MOONROOF
- BLUETOOTH
- VEHICLE STABILITY ASSIST
- ADVANCED COMPATIBILITY
ENGINEERING
*LEASE PLUS TAX, TAGS, TITLE AND $129 PROCESSING FEE WITH 36 MONTHLY PAYMENTS
AT 10K MILES PER YEAR WITH $999 DOWN PAYMENT PLUS FIRST MONTHS PAYMENT.
GAP INSURANCE INCLUDED. RESIDUAL $20,799.30.
*L
AT
GA
NEW 2012 ACURA
TTTTTTTTLLLLLLLL
6-SPEED AUTO
MODEL# UA8F2CJW
$
359
LEASE
FOR
PLUS TAX & TAGS FOR 36 MONTHS*
- 6CL I VTECH ENGINE
- 6 SPEED AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION
WITH GRADE LOGIC
- LEATHER INTERIOR
- POWER MOONROOF
- BLUETOOTH
- VEHICLE STABILITY ASSIST
- ADVANCED COMPATIBILITY
ENGINEERING
NEW 2013 ACURA
RRRRRRRRDDDDDDDDXXXXXXXX
NEW 2013 ACURA
IIIIIIIILLLLLLLLXXXXXXXX
IN-STOCK &AVAILABLE FOR DELIVERY!
GAP INSURANCE INCLUDED
GAP INSURANCE INCLUDED
GAP INSURANCE INCLUDED
*ALL PRICES AND PAYMENTS, PLUS TAX, TAG AND TITLE. PHOTOS ARE FOR DISPLAY PURPOSES ONLY. DEALER NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPO-
GRAPHICAL ERRORS. PRIOR SALES EXCLUDED. FINANCING AVAILABLE WITH APPROVED CREDIT. MINIMUM FINANCED $15K WITH APPROVED
CREDIT THRU DESIGNATED LENDER. SUBJECT TO MANUFACTURER PROGRAM CHANGES. FINANCING ON SELECT PRE-OWNED MODELS. QUALIFIED
CUSTOMERS ONLY. SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. ALL OFFERS EXPIRE 7/31/12.
www.motorworldgroupmercedes.com
Certied Pre-Owned LowAPRRates
*Qualied customers only. Offer excludes any model year Sprinter, smart, and SLS models. See dealer for details.
There is Mercedes-Benz, and there is everything else.
If you currently own an eligible competitive vehicle, you can get up to:
$4,000 towards the 2012 Mercedes-Benz of your choice.
Driving a Mercedes-Benz has never been more rewarding.
*Eligible customers will receive up to 5 months payment credit on their current lease with a lease or nance of any new 2012 or
2013 Mercedes-Benz vehicle through Mercedes-Benz Financial Services. Certain exclusions apply. See dealer for details.
In this case, the credit is going exactly where its due.
Up to 5 months Payment Credit on your current Mercedes-Benz Financial Services lease with
the purchase of a new 2012 or 2013 Mercedes-Benz.
New 2012 Mercedes-Benz
$41,395 MSRP
$369*
Plus Tax for 24 Months
LEASE FOR
C300 Sport Sedan 4MATIC AWD
$4,029 Total Due at Delivery. SECURITY DEPOSIT INCLUDED.
$2,865.00 Cap Cost. 10K MILES PER YEAR. RESIDUAL $29,390.00.
New 2012 Mercedes-Benz
$57,865 MSRP
$599*
Plus Tax for 24 Months
LEASE FOR
E350 Sedan 4MATIC AWD
$4,993 Total Due at Delivery. SECURITY DEPOSIT INCLUDED.
$3,599.00 Cap Cost. 10K MILES PER YEAR. RESIDUAL $41,084.00.
GLK350 SUV
New 2012 Mercedes-Benz
$42,705 MSRP
$439*
$4,603 Total Due at Delivery. SECURITY DEPOSIT INCLUDED.
$3,389.00 Cap Cost. 10K MILES PER YEAR. RESIDUAL $27,758.00.
Plus Tax for 30 Months
LEASE FOR
New 2012 Mercedes-Benz
$42,705 MSRP
$419*
$4,603 Total Due at Delivery. SECURITY DEPOSIT INCLUDED.
$3,389.00 Cap Cost. 10K MILES PER YEAR. RESIDUAL $29,466.00.
Plus Tax for 24 Months
LEASE FOR
GLK350 SUV
2009 MERCEDES-BENZ C300 SEDAN AWD
STK# B9539A, 43,693 MI ....................................................................................................... SALE PRICE $23,711
2009 MERCEDES-BENZ SEDAN C300 AWD
STK# BP15724, 38,000 MI....................................................................................................... SALE PRICE $28,533
2010 MERCEDES-BENZ GLK SUV AWD
STK# BP15717A, 30,370 MI..................................................................................................... SALE PRICE $28,995
2010 MERCEDES-BENZ C300 SEDAN AWD
STK# BP15796, 24,461 MI....................................................................................................... SALE PRICE $31,995
2011 MERCEDES-BENZ GLK AWD
STK# BS0376, 13,459 MI......................................................................................................... SALE PRICE $31,995
2012 MERCEDES-BENZ GLK AWD
STK# BS04043, 8,338 MI......................................................................................................... SALE PRICE $34,995
2011 MERCEDES-BENZ C300 SEDAN AWD
STK# BS0378, 12,458 MI......................................................................................................... SALE PRICE $34,995
2011 MERCEDES-BENZ E350 COUPE
STK# BP15744, 12,447 MI, NAVIGATION................................................................................... SALE PRICE $50,190
*PHOTOS ARE FOR DISPLAY PURPOSES ONLY. DEALER NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS. PRIOR SALES EXCLUDED. ALL PRICES AND PAYMENTS ARE PLUS TAX, TAGS, TITLE
AND $129 PROCESSING FEE AND ARE SUBJECT TO CREDIT APPROVAL. ZERO SECURITY DEPOSIT. FINANCING ON SELECT MODELS WITH APPROVED CREDIT. 1.9% APR FINANCING FOR 60
MONTHS = $17.50/$1,000 FINANCED. **LOYALTY REWARD AVAILABLE TO CURRENT LEXUS OWNERS AND LESSEES WHEN FINANCED OR LEASED THROUGH LFS WITH CREDIT APPROVAL.
SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. OFFERS EXPIRE 7/31/12.
www.motorworldlexus.com
WELCOME TOTHE FRONT OF THE LINE
LEXUSCERTIFIEDPRE-OWNEDSALESEVENT
3YEAR/100,000MILELIMITEDWARRANTYAVAILABLEONALL CERTIFIEDPRE-OWNEDLEXUSVEHICLES*
2008 LEXUS IS250 CPO
STK# A1196B, 30K MI, LEATHER, SUNROOF, AWD ................................................................... SALE PRICE $24,734
2009 LEXUS ES350 CPO
STK# L11636A, 23K MI, LEATHER, SUNROOF, NAVIGATION...................................................... SALE PRICE $25,499
2010 LEXUS RX350 CPO
STK# L11603A, 36K MI, LEATHER, SUNROOF, AWD.................................................................. SALE PRICE $32,463
2010 LEXUS RX450h CPO
STK# B9648A, 27K MI, LEATHER, SUNROOF, NAVIGATION, AWD ............................................... SALE PRICE $41,672
*LEASE BASED ON 27 MONTHLY PAYMENTS AT 10K MILES PER YEAR WITH $4,252 DUE AT SIGNING
PLUS TAX, TAGS, TITLE AND $129 PROCESSING FEE. $0 SECURITY DEPOSIT. RESIDUAL $31,171.
$
429
LEASE FOR
27MONTHS
PLUS TAX + TAGS
MSRP: $44,530
NEW2012LEXUSRX350FWD
THE ALL NEW2013 LEXUS GS350 AWD
*LEASE BASED ON 27 MONTHLY PAYMENTS AT 10K MILES PER YEAR WITH $3,609 DUE AT SIGNING
PLUS TAX, TAGS, TITLE AND $129 PROCESSING FEE. $0 SECURITY DEPOSIT. RESIDUAL $40,267.
NOWINSTOCK!
$
559
LEASE FOR
27MONTHS
PLUS TAX + TAGS
MSRP: $55,927
*LEASE BASED ON 36 MONTHLY PAYMENTS AT 10K MILES PER YEAR WITH $5,224 DUE AT SIGNING
PLUS TAX, TAGS, TITLE AND $129 PROCESSING FEE. $0 SECURITY DEPOSIT. RESIDUAL $40,063 (AWD).
$
799
LEASE FOR
36MONTHS
PLUS TAX + TAGS
MSRP: $74,190
NEW2012LEXUSLS460AWD
*LEASE BASED ON 27 MONTHLY PAYMENTS AT 10K MILES PER YEAR WITH $2,999 DUE AT SIGNING
PLUS TAX, TAGS, TITLE AND $129 PROCESSING FEE. $0 SECURITY DEPOSIT. RESIDUAL $25,381.
$
359
LEASE FOR
27MONTHS
PLUS TAX + TAGS
MSRP: $39,027
1.9%APR
FOR UP TO60 MONTHS*
NOWSAVE $1,000WITH
THE LEXUS LOYALTYREWARD
NEW2012LEXUSES350
LOYALTY HAS ITS REWARDS
NOWSAVE $1,000 WITH THE LEXUS LOYALTY REWARD PROGRAM
ON ALL NEW 2012 ES350 AND IS250/350 SEDANS.**
*PRICES & PAYMENTS ARE PLUS TAX, TAGS & TITLE. PHOTOS ARE FOR DISPLAY PURPOSES ONLY. DEALER NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHI-
CAL ERRORS. ALL PRICES INCLUDE APPLICABLE REBATES AND/OR INCENTIVES. SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. PRIOR SALES EXCLUDED. ALL OFFERS
SUBJECT TO MANUFACTURES PROGRAM CHANGES. PRICES AVAILABLE ON ADVERTISED VEHICLES ONLY. MILEAGE CHARGE OF $.25/MILE OVER
30K MILES. LESSEE PAYS FOR EXCESS WEAR. NOT AVAILABLE WITH SOME OTHER OFFERS. SECURITY DEPOSIT IS NOT REQUIRED AT TIME OF
DELIVERY. FINANCING ON SELECT MODELS THRU ALLY FINANCIAL, MUST QUALIFY. SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. ALL OFFERS EXPIRE 7/31/12.
www.motorworldgm.com
LEASE FOR
$
279
PLUS TAX/TAGS FOR 24 MONTHS*
NEW 2012 CADILLAC CTS COUPE AWD
STK# C3634
PLU PLUS PLU PLUS PLU PL
*LEASE BASED ON 24 MONTHLY PAYMENTS AT 10K MILES PER YEAR WITH $1,995 DUE AT SIGNING WITH
APPROVED CREDIT THRU ALLY FINANCIAL. INCLUDES $2,000 CONQUEST REBATE.
MUST CURRENTLY BE IN A NON-GM LEASE TO QUALIFY.
LEASE FOR
$
259
PLUS TAX/TAGS FOR 39 MONTHS*
NEW 2012 CADILLAC CTS SEDAN AWD
STK# C3528
PLU PLUS PPPL
*LEASE BASED ON 39 MONTHLY PAYMENTS AT 10K MILES PER YEAR WITH $1,995 DUE AT SIGNING WITH
APPROVED CREDIT THRU ALLY FINANCIAL. INCLUDES $2,000 CONQUEST REBATE.
MUST CURRENTLY BE IN A NON-GM LEASE TO QUALIFY.
LEASE FOR
$
399
PLUS TAX/TAGS FOR 39 MONTHS*
NEW 2012 CADILLAC SRX LUXURY AWD
STK# C3611
*LEASE BASED ON 39 MONTHLY PAYMENTS AT 10K MILES PER YEAR WITH $1,995 DUE AT SIGNING WITH
APPROVED CREDIT THRU ALLY FINANCIAL. INCLUDES $2,000 CONQUEST REBATE.
MUST CURRENTLY BE IN A NON-GM LEASE TO QUALIFY.
PLUS PLUS PLUS PLU
NEW 2012 CADILLAC SRX LUXURY AWD
*LEASEE BASED ON ON ONN 39 M 39 M 39 M 39 M 39 ONTH ONTH ONTHLY P LY P LY PAYME AYMEE AYM AYMEENTS NTS NTS NTS TS AT 1 AT 1 AT 1 AT 1 AT 10K M 0K 0K M 0K M 0K ILES LES ILES ILES PER PER PER PER YEAR WITH $1,9 99
APPROOVED CREDIT THHRU U ALLY FINANCIAL INCLUDESS $2 000 CONQUEST REBAT AT
,
NEW 2012 CADILLAC ESCALADE AWD PREMIUMDEMO
STK# C3575
LEASE FOR
$
769
PLUS TAX/TAGS FOR 24 MONTHS*
*LEASE BASED ON 24 MONTHLY PAYMENTS AT 10K MILES PER YEAR WITH $4,995 DUE AT SIGNING WITH
APPROVED CREDIT THRU ALLY FINANCIAL. INCLUDES $3,000 CONQUEST REBATE.
MUST CURRENTLY BE IN A NON-GM LEASE TO QUALIFY.
MOTORWORLD CADILLAC
SUMMER EVENT
MotorWorld Acura 1-866-807-9004
150 Motorworld Drive, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18703
MotorWorld Cadillac 1-866-807-9004
150 Motorworld Drive, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18703
MotorWorld Lexus 1-866-807-9004
150 Motorworld Drive, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18703
MotorWorld 1-866-807-9004
150 Motorworld Drive, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18703
KT
Auto
www. ktauto. com
430 West Market St.,
Scranton 346-1133
Stocking all major brands
We gladly install internet tire purchases.
A division of Kelleher Tire
SEE US FOR ALLYOURTIRE NEEDS!
Check OUR MONEY SAVING COUPONS ON OURWEBSITE!
We Buy Low Mileage GM Cars!
CARS
10 Impala LT Florida Car $12,995
10 HHR Florida Car $12,995
09 Pontiac G-6 V6, 41K $12,995
08 Impala LT 1-Owner $11,995
08 SaturnVUE FWD $12,995
08 HHR LS $9,995
08 Malibu Hybrid, 44K $11,995
08 Pontiac G-5 In Stock $10,995
07 Malibu 38K $9,995
06 Lucerne CX $10,995
07 Impala Police Car 47K $9,995
VANS
07 Uplander Cargo $7,995
05 Uplander Cargo, 3 Pass $8,995
05 Uplander Passenger Van $9,995
03 GMC 2500 8 Passenger, 58K $9,995
PICKUPS
02 Silverado 2500 3/4Ton
CNG or Gas 6.0V-8 Auto, 2WD $11,995
A Di vi si on Of Kel l eher Ti re
Spring
Special
H AND W AX AND CLEAN
COME IN TODAY
M AK EYOUR CAR SHIN E
ProfessionalA uto Detailing
A t A n A ffordable Price
- Includes thorough hand w ash, hand w ax,
w indow cleaning, vacuum , and tire detail.
Jus t$59.99
701 South State Street,
Clarks Summit, PA 18411
542 Logistics/
Transportation
PROFESSIONAL
CLASS A DRIVERS:
OTR tractor trailer,
good pay, great
home time, health
insurance, 401K,
paid vacation,
bonus package, and
top equipment all in
a small company
atmosphere,
backed up with
large company ben-
efits. Call Victoria
877-833-9307 or
visit www.pam-
drivers.com
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
DRIVERS - CDL-A
EXPERIENCED DRI-
VERS: 6 Months
OTR experience
starts at $.32/mile
Up to $5,000 Sign-
On Bonus! New stu-
dent pay and lease
program!
877-521-5775
www.USATRUCK.jobs
542 Logistics/
Transportation
LUBRICANT & OIL
EQUIPMENT
DISTRIBUTOR BASED
IN AVOCA, PA IS
LOOKING FOR
EXPERIENCED,
MOTIVATED, AND
DEPENDABLE PEOPLE
TO JOIN OUR TEAM.
CRAFT OIL
CORPORATION
CURRENTLY HAS THE
FOLLOWING
EMPLOYMENT OPPOR-
TUNITIES AVAILABLE:
Operations Assistant
RESPONSIBLE FOR
ASSISTING THE
OPERATIONS MANAGER
WITH DAY TO DAY
ADMINISTRATIVE DUTIES
CRITICAL TO
DISTRIBUTION OPERA-
TIONS. SUCCESSFUL
CANDIDATE MUST HAVE
A LOGISTICS BACK-
GROUND AND STRONG
ORAL COMMUNICATION
SKILLS. DOT BACK-
GROUND AND EXPERI-
ENCE IN A DISTRIBUTION
ENVIRONMENT A PLUS.
Logistics Analyst
SUCCESSFUL CANDIDATE
MUST HAVE STRONG
COMPUTER AND
ANALYTICAL SKILLS.
TRANSPORTATION BACK-
GROUND WITH EXPERI-
ENCE IN A DISTRIBUTION
AND/OR WAREHOUSE
ENVIRONMENT A PLUS.
COMPETITIVE PAY WITH
EXPERIENCE FACTORED.
FULL BENEFIT PACKAGE
INCLUDING HEALTH BEN-
EFITS, FSA, 401K, AND
PAID TIME OFF.
PREFERRED METHOD
OF APPLYING FOR
THIS POSITION IS TO
VISIT OUR WEBSITE TO
COMPLETE AN ONLINE
APPLICATION.
TO OBTAIN AN APPLICA-
TION PLEASE VISIT OUR
FACILITY OR YOU CAN
VISIT OUR WEBSITE AT
WWW.CRAFTOILCORP.
COM.
TO APPLY IN PERSON:
CRAFT OIL
CORPORATION
837 CHERRY STREET
AVOCA, PA, 18641
FAX- 570-451-0700
NO PHONE CALLS
PLEASE. EOE
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
548 Medical/Health
DENTURE
LAB TECHNICIAN
EXPERIENCED DENTURE
LAB TECHNICIAN FOR
DENTURE LAB AND POS-
SIBLE FUTURE OWNER-
SHIP. SEND REPLIES TO:
C/O THE TIMES LEADER
BOX 4100
15 N. MAIN ST.
WILKES-BARRE, PA
18711-0250
551 Other
FOSTER
PARENTS
NEEDED
FCCY is looking
for people to
help meet the
growing demand
for foster homes.
Those interested
in becoming
foster parents
call
1-800-747-3807
EOE.
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
554 Production/
Operations
WELDERS
KMS FAB LLC has
immediate openings
on all shifts for
combination
welders. Must be
able to MIG and TIG
all types of materi-
als and do own set
up. Please email
resume to
kbrunges@kmspa.com
Or apply in person
at 100 Parry Street
Luzerne, PA. 18709
EOE
600
FINANCIAL
610 Business
Opportunities
BUSINESS FOR SALE
Quaint family
restaurant in New
Albany, PA, with 2
occupied upstairs
apartments. Turn
key operation. For
more info, call
570-637-4197
610 Business
Opportunities
JAN-PRO COMMERCIAL
CLEANING OF
NORTHEASTERN PA
Concerned about
your future?
BE YOUR OWN BOSS
Work Full or
Part time
Accounts available
NOW throughout
Luzerne &
Lackawanna,
Counties
We guarantee
$5,000.to $200,000
in annual billing.
Investment
Required
Were ready Are
you?
For more info call
570-824-5774
Jan-Pro.com
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
630 Money To Loan
We can erase
your bad credit -
100% GUARAN-
TEED. Attorneys
for the Federal
Trade Commission
say theyve never
seen a legitimate
credit repair opera-
tion. No one can
legally remove
accurate and timely
information from
your credit report.
Its a process that
starts with you and
involves time and a
conscious effort to
pay your debts.
Learn about manag-
ing credit and debt
at ftc. gov/credit. A
message from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
700
MERCHANDISE
708 Antiques &
Collectibles
BASEBALL CARDS
88 Fleer major
prospects league,
82 signed Topps
77-81 Donruss
cards all $35.
FOOTBALL CARDS a
wide selection, call
for details 430-2311
712 Baby Items
CRIB, light wood,
barely used, $100
obo. BABY
CLOTHES, 6-9
months, some 12
month, $20 for the 2
bags, some still
have tags. EXER-
SAUCER, $50.
HIGHCHAIR, $15.
PUSH WALKER, $10.
Contact Erica at
570-287-0197.
732 Exercise
Equipment
WATER COOLER
$100. neg.
570-301-3801
744 Furniture &
Accessories
CHAIRS, (2)
Genuine
leather, cus-
tom made
recliners.
Taupe color,
like new. $550
each. SOFA,
CHAIR,
OTTOMAN, 3
TABLES, great
for den. Wood
and cloth, all in
excellent condi-
tion. $450.
Call after 12 noon
570-675-5046
FURNI SH FURNI SH
FOR LESS FOR LESS
* NELSON *
* FURNITURE *
* WAREHOUSE *
Recliners from $299
Lift Chairs from $699
New and Used
Living Room
Dinettes, Bedroom
210 Division St
Kingston
Call 570-288-3607
TABLE oak round
kitchen table with
antique white
pedestal base
includes 2 chairs,
seats 4-6 $100.
570-430-2311
744 Furniture &
Accessories
LIVING ROOM SET,
3 piece - black
couch, loveseat,
chair, $350. 5 years
old. Good condition.
(218) 410-0743 or
email davidschultz
81@gmail.com for
pictures.
Mattress
A Queen Size
Pillow Top Set
Still in Plastic
Can Deliver
$150
570-280-9628
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
748 Good Things To
Eat
PICK YOUR OWN
BLUEBERRIES!
8am to 8pm
Closed Sundays
Sickler Blueberry
Farm - Vernon
570-333-5286
570-333-4944
NO PETS IN THE
FIELD!!
752 Landscaping &
Gardening
LAWN TRACTOR-
Wheel Horse 11HP.
Cutting deck 42
inch. New carbure-
tor, new belts, new
blades. $500 or
best offer.
Call 570-388-6348
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
758 Miscellaneous
FLATWARE, stain-
less steel, 321 total
pieces,(37 lbs)
spoons, knives &
forks. Excellent con-
dition with wood
storage case. $50.
570-735-6638
GARAGE SALE
LEFTOVERS
BIKE girls like new
$45. KEYBOARD
with stand, very
good condition $45.
570-693-6201
LEFTOVER
GARAGE SALE
ITEMS
BED, King Size,
Brass, $125. BED-
ROOM SUITE, 5
piece, Bassett, wal-
nut, $250. DINETTE
SET, 5 piece, Oak
includes uphol-
stered tweed
chairs, $250.
Call 570-675-5046
after 12 noon.
758 Miscellaneous
GARAGE SALE
LEFTOVERS
Rain Xcar luggage
carrier $20. 17
yards waverly fabric
neg. Cuisinart ice
cream/sorbet/yogur
t maker neg. Large
wooden salad bowl
& dishes neg. Arts
& crafts stamps
neg. Weslo cardio
glide $30. Long-
berger basket &
liner $8. Night
vision glasses $7.
Name brand
womens slacks 14
& 16 $3. pair. 570-
779-1505/814-9062
OLD TV REPAIRMAN
TUBE CADDY, very
sturdy case 22in.
long x 12in high x 9in
wide, $10.
570-735 6638
776 Sporting Goods
FLY ROD & REEL,
Garcimatic #1431
automatic fly reel &
Diwa #3046n, 8ft 6in
fly rod. Very good
condition. Both for
$50. 570-735-6638
GOLF CLUBS,
Ladies right hand
golf clubs. 1, 5, 7
Fairway Clubs, alu-
minum heads. All
irons, umbrella, put-
ter and like new
bag. $60 OBO.
570-655-9474 Collect
Cash.
Not
Dust.
Sell it in The
Times Leader
Classied
section.
Call 829-7130
to place an ad.
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNNNNL L NNNL N YONE NNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LLE LLE LEE LE LE LLE DER DDD .
timesleader.com
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
PAGE 18 Abington Journal WEDNESDAY JULY 18, 2012
CALL NOW 823-8888 CALL NOW 823-8888
1-800-817-FORD 1-800-817-FORD
Overlooking Mohegan Sun Overlooking Mohegan Sun
577 East Main St., Plains 577 East Main St., Plains
Just Minutes from Scranton or W-B Just Minutes from Scranton or W-B
FORD - LINCOLN
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied
**Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank
Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 7/31/12.
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied
**Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank
Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 7/31/12.
Automatic, 16 Steel
Wheels, Pwr. Windows,
Pwr. Door Locks,
Air, Keyless Entry
with Remote,
Safety Canopy,
Side Air Bags
24
Mos.
%
XLT, Safety Canopy, Side Impact Safety
Pkg., Pwr. Drivers Seat, Auto., PDL, PW,
Air, Fog Lamps, Privacy Glass,
Roof Rack, 16 Alum. Wheels,
Sirius Satellite Radio, CD,
Keyless Entry, Rear
Cargo Convenience
Pkg., ,
APR
PLUS
APR
PLUS
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 7/31/12.
24
Mos.
APR
PLUS
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied
**Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank
Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 7/31/12.
24
Mos.
XLT, Safety Canopy,
Side Impact Safety Pkg., Pwr. Drivers
Seat, Air, Auto., PDL, Fog Lamps,
Privacy Glass, Roof Rack, CD,
16 Alum. Wheels, PW, Sirius
Satellite Radio, Rear
Cargo Convenience
Pkg., Keyless Entry,
APR
PLUS
Auto., CD, Alum Wheels, Tilt, PW, PDL,
Pwr. Seat, Safety Pkg., Side Impact
Air Bags, Message Center,
1st & 2nd Air Curtains,
Anti-Theft Sys., Keyless
Entry, Sirius Satellite Radio,
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 7/31/12.
24
Mos.
APR
PLUS Auto., CD, Alum Wheels, Tilt, PW, PDL, Pwr. Seat,
Safety Pkg., Side Impact Air Bags, 1st & 2nd
Air Curtains, Anti-Theft Sys., Sirius Satellite
Radio, Keyless Entry w/Keypad,
Message Center
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 7/31/12.
24
Mos.
CD, Alum
Wheels, Tilt, PW, PDL, Pwr. Seat, Safety
Pkg., Side Impact Air Bags, 1st & 2nd
Air Curtains, Anti-Theft Sys., Sirius
Satellite Radio, Keyless Entry with
Keypad, Message Center,
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 7/31/12.
2.5L I4 Engine, Rain Sensor Wipers, Pwr. Moonroof,
Sony Sound Sys., CD, Alum Wheels, Tilt, PW, PDL,
Safety Pkg., Side Impact Air Bags, 1st & 2nd Air
Curtains, Anti-Theft Sys., Sirius Satellite
Radio, Keyless Entry with Keypad,
Message Center,
APR
PLUS
APR
PLUS
WEDNESDAY JULY 18, 2012 Abington Journal PAGE 19
PAGE 20 Abington Journal WEDNESDAY JULY 18, 2012
7
6
7
0
1
8
SHOP 24/7 WWW.VALLEYCHEVROLET.COM
THE PRICE YOU SEE IS
THE PRICE YOU PAY!
NO
NEED TO
NEGOTIATE
2012 CHEVY SONIC LT
Stk. #12680,
1.8L Ecotec-VVT
DOHC 4 Cyl, Auto,
Stabilitrak, XM
Radio, AM/FM/
CD, PDL, A/C,
Rear Wiper Washer,
Spoiler, OnStar
TOTAL
CONFIDENCE
SALE PRICE
$
15,669
*
APR
2012 CHEVY CRUZE LS
MPG
hwy
Stk. #12610
2012 CHEVY CAMARO
LS COUPE
2012 CHEVY TRAVERSE
LS FWD
2012 CHEVY MALIBU
LS
2012 CHEVY EQUINOX
LS FWD
2012 CHEVY COLORADO
CREW CAB 4X4
2012 CHEVY SILVERADO
1500 4LS CREW CAB 4WD
2012 CHEVY SILVERADO
1500 REGULAR CAB 2WD
2012 CHEVY SILVERADO
1500 EXTENDED CAB 4X4 W/T
2012 CHEVY SILVERADO
1500 EXTENDED CAB LT 4X4
2012 CHEVY IMPALA
LS SEDAN
2012 CHEVY AVALANCHE
1500 LS 4WD
2012 CHEVY CORVETTE
SPORT 1LT COUPE
2012 CHEVY SUBURBAN
LS 4X4
35
MPG
hwy
Stk. #12702, 2.4L DOHC 4V ECOTEC, 6 Speed Automatic Tapshift
Manual Trans., Air, PW, PDL, Onstar w/ Turn-By-Turn Navigation, Re-
mote Keyless Entry, XM Satellite Radio, AM/FM/CD/MP3 Format,
Stk. #12726, 2.4L DOHC 4 Speed Auto, A/C, Cruise, XM Radio, OnStar
w/Turn-By-Turn Navigation, Bluetooth, 17 Alum. Wheels,
Remote Keyless Entry, Tilt, AM/FM CD
Stk. #12505, 3.7L I5 4 Speed Auto, Insta-Trac 4x4 Transfer Case, PW, PDL, Air, Fog Lamps,
OnStar w/Turn-By-Turn Navigation, Bluetooth, Keyless Entry, Locking Rear Dierential
Stk. #12584, 5.3L V8, AT, A/C, Power Windows, Power Door Locks, EZ Lift Tailgate, Lock-
ing Rear Dierential, Alum. Wheels, OnStar Turn-by-Turn Navigation, XM Satellite
Stk. #12525, 4.3L V6 Auto, AC, Cruise, 17 Steel Wheels, Stabilitrak, AM/FM
Stereo, Rubberized Vinyl Floor Covering
Stk. #12257, VORTEC 4.8L V8 Auto, Air, Cruise, AM/FM Stereo, Deep Tinted
Glass, Stabilitrak, 17 Steel Wheels, Folding Rear Seat
Stk. #12448, 5.3L V8 Auto, All Star Edition, AC, Remote Start, PW, PDL, P.
Drivers Seat, 18 Alum. WHeels, EZ Liftgate, Bluetooth, OnStar w/Turn-By-Turn
Navigation, Trailering Pkg. & More
Stk. #12730, 3.6L SIDI V6 Auto, Traction Control System, Air, All Star Edition,
Power Mirrors, PW, PDL, Front Buckets, 3rd Row Seat, XM Radio, Rear Spoiler,
OnStar w/Turn-By-Turn Navigation, 2nd & 3rd Row Split Bench Seats & More
TOTAL
CONFIDENCE
SALE PRICE
TOTAL
CONFIDENCE
SALE PRICE
TOTAL
CONFIDENCE
SALE PRICE
TOTAL
CONFIDENCE
SALE PRICE
$
19,999
*
$
22,999
*
$
23,227
*
$
27,578
*
33
MPG
hwy
30
MPG
hwy
30
MPG
hwy
$3451
TOTAL
SAVINGS
MSRP $
24,240
Stk. #12632, 1.8L
ECOTEC VVT 4-Cyl,
6 Speed Manual Trans.,
PW, PDL, Bluetooth,
USB Audio Interface,
Front Bucket Seats, Air,
OnStar w/Turn-By-Turn
Navigation, XM Radio,
AM/FM CD
TOTAL
CONFIDENCE
SALE PRICE
$
16,999
*
TOTAL
CONFIDENCE
SALE PRICE
TOTAL
CONFIDENCE
SALE PRICE
TOTAL
CONFIDENCE
SALE PRICE
TOTAL
CONFIDENCE
SALE PRICE
$
22,821
*
$
33,543
*
$
54,999
*
$
41,818
*
Stk. #12063, 3.5L V6 Automatic, Dual Zone Air Conditioning, Stabilitrak,
Six-Way Power Driver Seat, PW, PDL, Tilt, OnStar, XM Satellite Radio
Stk#12411, VORTEC 5.3 SFI V8, Auto, Air, PW, PDL, Power Drivers
Seat, Deep Tinted Glass, OnStar, XM Radio, CD, Luggage Rack Cross
Bars, Rear Storage Compartment & More
Stk. #12049, 6.2L 436HP 6 Speed Manuarl Trans, XM Radio, Leather,
Removable Roof Panel, AC, Performance Pkg., Power Options, Dual Mode
Perofmrance Exhaust, Chrome Alum. Wheels & Much More!
Stk. #12606, Vortec 5.3 SFI V8 6 Speed Automatic, 2nd Row
Bench, Power Options, F/R Air, XM Satellite Radio, Onstar, Luggage
Rack, 3rd Row Seat, Assist Steps, Remote Start Pickup Package
MSRP $
26,665
MSRP $
61,375
MSRP $
40,765
MSRP $
46,105 MSRP $
24,355
MSRP $
29,270
MSRP $
36,560
MSRP $
24,175
MSRP $
31,565
MSRP $
38,455
MSRP $
30,585
TOTAL
CONFIDENCE
SALE PRICE
$
26,821
*
TOTAL
CONFIDENCE
SALE PRICE
$
20,622
**
TOTAL
CONFIDENCE
SALE PRICE
$
26,499
**
TOTAL
CONFIDENCE
SALE PRICE
$
30,573
**
TOTAL
CONFIDENCE
SALE PRICE
$
30,344
**
*Price of vehicle plus tax and tags. Prices include all rebates, Love it or return it 60 day guarantee bonus cash; trade-in bonus cash applicable on - select Silverado models. $500
All Star Consumer cash-stock #12448; See salesperson for details). Must take delivery by July 31, 2012. Not responsible for typographical errors. Artwork for illustration only.
WE WANT
YOUR TRADE
CARS TRUCKS RVS
ATVS MOTORCYCLES
COMMERCIAL
WE WILL GIVE
YOU TOP DOLLAR
$ $
MSRP $
16,235
MSRP $
23,450
12 AVAILABLE
10 AVAILABLE
20 AVAILABLE
15 AVAILABLE
1LT 2LT 2LS
1SS 2SS
CONVERTIBLE
40 AVAILABLE
$3844
TOTAL
SAVINGS
$3006
TOTAL
SAVINGS
$5987
TOTAL
SAVINGS
$8100
TOTAL
SAVINGS
$7222
TOTAL
SAVINGS
$4287
TOTAL
SAVINGS
75
SILVERADOS
TO
CHOOSE
FROM
MSRP $
17,870
MSRP $
61375
$6376
TOTAL
SAVINGS
WEDNESDAY JULY 18, 2012 Abington Journal PAGE 21
timesleader.com
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Te Greater Scranton Board of REALTORS

, Inc.
Open House Directory
Scranton 817 Brook St. 12-1PM Prudential Preferred Properties
Scranton 847 Moosic St. 1:30-2:30PM Prudential Preferred Properties
Ransom 2371 Newton Ransom Blvd. 1-2:30PM Prudential Preferred Properties
Old Forge 149 Taroli St. 12-1PM Prudential Preferred Properties
Dunmore 1 Gulotti Dr. 1-2PM Lewith & Freeman Real Estate
Spring Brook Twp. 825 Route 690 1-3PM Coldwell Banker Town & Country
Gouldsboro 72 Lakeview Timbers Dr. 1-4PM Coldwell Banker Town & Country
Moosic 2302 Browning Close 1-3PM Coldwell Banker Town & Country
Moosic 2305 Browning Close 1-3PM Lewith & Freeman Real Estate
Scranton 1609 Summit Pointe 1:30-2:30PM Prudential Preferred Properties
Scranton 1218 Luzerne St. 2-3PM Prudential Preferred Properties
Eynon 105 Main St. 2-4PM Coldwell Banker Town & Country
Visit timesleader.com & Click Homes
to see the most up to date list of Open Houses
SUNDAY, JULY 22
ND
, 2012
PAGE 22 Abington Journal WEDNESDAY JULY 18, 2012
906 Homes for Sale
566 Sales/Business
Development
906 Homes for Sale
566 Sales/Business
Development
906 Homes for Sale
566 Sales/Business
Development
906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale
CALL THE VISION TEAM TODAY 570-585-5800
VISION REALTY
AFFORDABLE
HOMES
933 NORTHERN BLVD, CLARKS SUMMIT
PATRICK MASCIA
570-878-2209
pmascia.hyi@gmail.com
COLLEEN A. WEISSMAN
570-604-2335
ccwreo@gmail.com
COMING SOON
933 Northern Blvd, Clarks Summit
Centrally located 2nd foor offce space with 3 separate
offces , laminate fooring, wall to wall, Central air.
Small kitchen area. Offce in excellent condition. Park-
ing lot is shared. #12-2557 $1,250/Mo.
236-238 N Main Ave., Scranton
Building has 4apartments & store front.Only offers from
buyers using Federal Funds under National Stabilization
Program(NSP,Municipalities,Non-Proft Organization&Owner Oc-
cupants will be considered from day 8 thru day 12.From day 13
all offers will be considered.Buyer to Inspect Property 5 days prior
to close to determine property is in same condition as when Offer
was accepted. #11-4546 $25,000
181 Dundaff St., Forest City
Days 1-7: Offers will not be reviewed. Days 8-12: Offers
ONLY from NSP buyers, Municipalities, Non-proft orga-
nizations & Owner-occupants will be reviewed.Days 13+:
We will consider offers from all buyers Seller REQUIRES
Buyer obtain a free prequalifcation letter from Wells Fargo
Home Mortgage, an entity. #12-1949 $19,900
279 Ridge St., Ashley
Large 2 story affordable home with 3 bedrooms and
1 bath. Stone freplace , Large wrap around covered
porch and rear covered porch. 2 car rear garage .
Large level yard. #11-5040 $39,500
418 W GREEN ST., Hazleton
Very Large 6 room 3 bedroom 1 bath home in the
heart of Hazleton.Laminate foors. #12-2031 $39,000
65 Graham Ave., Hanover Twp.
Affordable 6 room 3bedroom home with eat in kitchen
and covered front porch.Rear porch/deck. Good size
rooms. #12-1538 $39,630
350 Smith St., Dunmore
Days 1-7: Offers will not be reviewed. Days 8-12: Offers ONLY from NSP
buyers, Municipalities, Non-proft organizations & Owner-occupants will
be reviewed.Days 13+: We will consider offers from all buyers Seller
REQUIRES Buyer obtain a free prequalifcation letter from Wells Fargo
Home Mortgage, an entity which is a joint venture with Wells Fargo
Home Mortgage
#12-2377 $49,900
184 Camptown Church Rd, Wyalusing
Large Victorian home recently painted. Large rooms
, detailed woodwork throughout the home. Large
parcel with detached garage #12-1979
$134,900
109 Exeter Cir., Old Forge
Days 1-7: Offers will not be reviewed. Days 8-12: Offers ONLY from NSP buyers,
Municipalities, Non-proft organizations and Owner-occupants will be reviewed.
Days 13+: We will consider offers from all buyers REALTOR REMARKS to include:
Seller REQUIRES Buyer obtain a free prequalifcation letter from Wells Fargo Home
Mortgage, an entity which is a joint venture with Wells Fargo. #12-1319
$149,000
284 High, Hop Bottom
Property being sold in as is: and is subject to HUD Guidelines 24 CFR 206.125
Please see offer instructions Covered front porch , large brick building with
added front, 3 beds and 1 bath. 2 extra spare room.
#12-3013 $44,000
214 Ashmore Ave., Clarks Summit
Large 5 bedroom home in the heart of Clarks Summit, Large lot,perfect for a
large family, Needs TLC. Loads of potential. Heat is Coal system or wood burn-
ing. #12-2981 $89,900
Why pay for outdated foreclosure lists? Visit our
site for the most current foreclosures at no charge.
Also you can search for the current properties
available for 7 counties in Northeast PA at
VISIONREALTYPA.COM
160 S. Main St.,
Scranton
2242 Highpoint
The Hideout, Lake Ariel
164 Tuthill Rd.,
Waymart
4 Harrison
Carbondale
YOUR CAREER. REINVENTED.
The Prudential Insurance Company of America, Newark, New Jersey and its afliates are Equal Opportunity/Afrmative Action Employers and are committed to diversity in its workforce.
Prudential is an employer that participates in E-Verify.
Prudential, the Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities.
0204417-00001-00 Ed. 7/2011
Lisa Hummel
Agency Recruiter
32 Scranton Ofce Park
Scranton, PA 18507
Phone 570-340-7052 Fax 570-340-7063
www.applicationstation.com
Code: PRUDWB_2R
Lisa.Hummel@Prudential.com
Picture a new kind of future one where you can make an impact, not just a
living. Train for a career in insurance and nancial product sales with The
Prudential Insurance Company of Americas Financial Professional Program.
Youll learn hands-on from seasoned professionals, in the classroom and the
eld. And youll get the support you need to prepare for required licensing
exams. All while receiving a generous compensation and benets package.
After your training period, youll have a world of opportunities
including the chance to lead your own practice.
Want to make an exciting career change?
If you have a strong interest in nancial sales,
email your resume or call me today.
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
518 Customer
Support/Client Care
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
518 Customer
Support/Client Care
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
State of the art Veterinary Referral and Emer-
gency Hospital, open 24/7, seeks experi-
enced Client Service Supervisor to lead our
team in providing exceptional client care.
Responsibilities include, developing systems
to address client needs; handling inquiries
and resolving issues; enhancing relation-
ships with referring veterinarians; protecting
financial assets; assisting with policy devel-
opment; hiring, training, scheduling, apprais-
ing our CSR staff; promoting cohesive inter-
action among members of other teams.
Candidates must have superior communica-
tion and organizational skills, with at least 3
years experience in a supervisory role. High
school diploma or equivalent required, col-
lege degree preferred. Experience in veteri-
nary, customer service, healthcare, hospitali-
ty or retail preferred. Benefits include com-
petitive salary, health/dental/vision insur-
ance, vacation and holiday pay, 401k, pet
care discount. Please send resume to:
NVRH
Attn: HR Dept.
242 S. River St., Suite 200
Plains, PA 18705
AA/EOE
northeast-vet.com
Client Service Supervisor
Body Shop Position - Manager
AutoBody Repair & Refinish Techs
Estimators
Send Resumes to:
C/O The Times Leader
Box 4105
15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-0250
Our shop is looking for the right manager to continue our
successful growth. Applicants must possess excellent estimating
and customer service skills. You must exhibit leadership qualities
and good decision-making while being self-motivated with good
work ethics. You must have experience maintaining working
relationships with insurance companies while participating in their
direct repair programs. A PA Vehicle Damage Appraisers License is
required. Pay is based on experience. Benefits included, health
care, vacation and bonus. All responses will be held confidential.
We have immediate openings for experienced Body Shop Techni-
cians & Paint Refinishers. Technicians must have experience in all
facets of collision repair, including straightening vehicle frames and
unibodies. Refinishers must have knowledge of paint mixing and
the application of all paint procedures.
Pay scale based on experience and includes benefit package.
All responses will be held confidential.
We need experienced vehicle damage appraisers.
Must have a PA Vehicle Damage Appraisers License and be
familiar with Audatex and CCC estimating systems.
You must be a team player and be able to work flexible hours.
Excellent pay and benefits. All responses will be held confidential.
776 Sporting Goods
GARAGE SALE
LEFTOVERS
GOLF CLUBS Trav-
elguard $40. Mens
starter Eagles win-
ter coat (L) $25.
Kids blue clues (24)
halloween costume
$6. infant sled $5.
10 boys bike with
training wheels $5.
570-237-0451
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
BUYING SPORT CARDS
Pay Cash for
baseball, football,
basketball, hockey
& non-sports.
Sets, singles &
wax. Also buying
comics.
570-212-0398
VITOS
&
GINOS
Wanted:
ALL
JUNK
CARS &
TRUCKS
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE PICKUP
288-8995
800
PETS & ANIMALS
815 Dogs
PAWS
TO CONSIDER....
ENHANCE
YOUR PET
CLASSIFIED
AD ONLINE
Call 829-7130
Place your pet ad
and provide us your
email address
This will create a
seller account
online and login
information will be
emailed to you from
gadzoo.com
The World of Pets
Unleashed
You can then use
your account to
enhance your online
ad. Post up to 6
captioned photos
of your pet
Expand your text to
include more
information, include
your contact
information such
as e-mail, address
phone number and
or website.
IRISH SETTERS
Beautiful pups AKC
registered. $300.
570-746-3637
607-592-5608
POMERANIAN PUPPIES
Male & Female. Vet
Checked, 1st shots.
$350. Family raised.
570-829-1735
SHIH-TZU PUPPIES
Parents on premises
$500
570-250-9690
840 Pet Services
Dog Agility Classes
in Clarks Summit.
Great way to have
fun with your dog!
Experienced
instructor, profes-
sional staff.
Contact Danielle at
570-954-5941 or
dsimmonscvt@
comcast.net.
900
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE
906 Homes for Sale
Having trouble
paying your mort-
gage? Falling
behind on your
payments? You
may get mail from
people who promise
to forestall your
foreclosure for a fee
in advance. Report
them to the Federal
Trade Commission,
the nations con-
sumer protection
agency. Call 1-877-
FTC-HELP or click
on ftc.gov. A mes-
sage from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
906 Homes for Sale
DALLAS TWP
Very private with
20 acres! 2nd floor
laundry room,
master with 2 per-
son spa, 3 car
garage, new stain-
less steel appli-
ances, low taxes,
zoned Ag-1.
$526,000
(570) 406-0403
HANOVER TWP.
New Construction.
Lot #2, Fairway
Estates. 2,700
square feet, tile &
hardwood on 1st
floor. Cherry cabi-
nets with center
island. $399,500.
For more details:
patrickdeats.com
(570)696-1041
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
HUNLOCK CREEK
Rustic country
home with 7 acres,
off Rt. 29 near Moon
Lake. 3 bedroom, 2
bath. Large kitchen
& living room. Sun-
room. 2 car garage.
2 story barn with
fenced in pasture.
This property also
comes with sepa-
rate septic well,
electric, carport &
shed. $235,000.
570-506-5986
HOMES FOR SALE
5 Homes left. 3 in
Nanticoke, 2 in
Edwardsville. Price
ranging from
$20,000 to $37,000
Call 516-216-3539
Leave Message
906 Homes for Sale
SWOYERSVILLE
689 Main Street
2 bedroom home on
large lot with bonus
efficiency apart-
ment. Large living
room, eat in kitchen,
screened porch.
Freshly painted and
new flooring. See
www.craiglslist.org
$69,000. Call
570-696-3368
To place your
ad Call Toll Free
1-800-427-8649
912 Lots & Acreage
Cameron County,
PA - 4 wooded
acres borders state
forest and has
frontage along two
streams! Perc
approved, electric,
road frontage.
$49,900. Owner
financing. 800-668-
8679.
JENKINS TOWNSHIP
Prestigious
Highland Hills
Development
.88 Acres. $75,000
570-947-3375
915 Manufactured
Homes
EAST MOUNTAIN RIDGE
(Formerly Pocono
Park) and San Souci
Park. Like new, sev-
eral to choose from,
Financing&Warranty,
MobileOneSales.net
Call (570)250-2890
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
CLIFFORD
2 bedroom apart-
ments. Country set-
ting, unfurnished or
furnished.
570-241-1743
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
DUPONT
Totally renovated
6 large room
apartment. Partially
furnished, brand
new fridge/electric
range, electric
washer & dryer on
1st floor. Brand new
custom draperies,
Roman shades,
carpeting/flooring
& energy efficient
windows. Kitchen
with snack bar. Full
tiled pink bath on
1st floor. Beautiful
original Victorian
wainscotting, ceil-
ings, woodwork &
vintage wall paper.
Victorian dining
room with wall to
wall carpet. Living
room with large
storage closet,
2 large bedrooms
with wall to wall &
large closets. Attic
partially finished for
storage. 2nd floor
large front balcony
with beautiful view
of the Valley. 1st
floor back porch
with large back
yard, off-street
parking. Easy
access to I-81, air-
port & casino. Tran-
quil neighborhood.
No smoking. $800
+ utilities & security.
570-762-8265
KINGSTON
72 E. 72 E. W Walnut alnut St. St.
2nd floor. Located in
quiet neighborhood.
Kitchen, living room,
dining room. Sun-
room. Bath. 3 bed-
rooms; 2 large & 1
small. Lots of clos-
ets. Built in linen
closet & hutch.
Hardwood and car-
peted floors. Fire-
place. Storage
room. Yard. Washer
/ dryer, stove /
fridge. Heat and hot
water included.
Available August 1.
One year lease +
security. $950
570-283-4370
LARKSVILLE
Spacious 2 bed-
room, 2nd floor with
balcony. W/d
hookup. Includes.
heat, hot water and
water. $675 + 1
month security.
845-386-1011
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
LUZERNE
Large, 2 bedroom,
2nd floor. Wall to
wall carpeting. Off
St. Parking. Washer /
dryer hookup. No
pets. $550 + utilities.
570-301-7723
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
PLAINS
1 bedroom, 2nd
floor, stove & refrig-
erator, washer/dry-
er hook-up, wall to
wall, gas heat, 2 car
off street parking,
no smoking, no
pets. Near Casino &
I-81. 1 year lease.
$400 + utilities,
security, 1st & last
month, credit &
background checks.
570-639-1564
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
LUZERNE
/W-B
$625/$750
QUALITY
REMODELED
UNITS
1 & 2 bedrooms,
new kitchens,
appliances, laun-
dry, enclosed
sunporches, fire-
places (gas),
carports, partic-
ulars upon
request. Some
$625-$750 + util-
ities. 2 Year
Leases. No Pets
No Smoking,
Employment
Verfification.
America Realty
288-1422
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WEST PITTSTON
The Hitchner
530 Exeter Ave
Now Accepting
Applications!
1, 2 & 3 bedroom
units available.
Elevator, parking
lot, central air,
appliances, wi-fi
access & more.
Income
Qualifications
required.
570-344-5999
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WILKES-BARRE
Walking distance to
Wilkes University,
minutes from Kings
Newly renovated.
Most utilities includ-
ed. Professional on
site management.
Off street parking.
Starting at $515.
866-466-0501 or
leasing-cumberland
@rentberger.com
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
WEDNESDAY JULY 18, 2012 Abington Journal PAGE 23
The Journal
Call 1-800-273-7130 For Local Pros
LOCAL PROS
DAPSIS
REGISTERED PLUMBING & HEATING SPECIALISTS
Serving Abingtons over 25 years Gas & Oil 24 Hour Service
313 Leach Hill Road., Clarks Summit 587-1401
WELL DRILLING
WELLS
PUMP REPAIR
FILTERS
PUMPS
WATER SOFTENERS
SULFUR REMOVAL
COMPLETE WATER SYSTEMS
ROUTES 6-11 DALTON, PA 18414
563-1123
TELL YOUR WATER PROBLEMS TO CRESSWELL
Route 107, Lake Sheridn
(10 Miles from Clarks Summit)
9:00-5:00 Mon-Fri 8:00-3:30 Sat
945-5379
Sales & Service
MTD Products, Briggs & Stratton,
Husqvarna, Tecumseh, Poulan, Kohler,
White, Mantis, Oregon, Echo, Muray
Small Engine Service
CLARK S SHARP-ALL
Ultimate Construction
Specializing in kitchen, bathroom & basement
renovations and all your building and remodeling needs
Licensed Registered (PA 056437)
Insured Quality Workmanship
570-383-0899 570-650-0658
CONTRACTORS
Pat Regan Gutter Cleaning
All Winter Long
Te Right Way Cleaned, Flushed and Minor Repairs
CALL BEFORE YOU REPLACE THEM
Call Pat Regan 383-1991 No Answer, Leave Message
MALONE HOME IMPROVEMENTS
New Construction, Remodeling,
Decks, Roofng, Siding, Kitchens,
Baths, Etc.
LICENSED & INSURED
570-499-8226
BLACKTOPPING & SEAL COATING
AIR CONDITIONING
& HEATING
BUILDING &
REMODELING
Visit us on the web at www.styl-n-stylz.com
Styl-N-Stylz Salon
310 Lackawanna Ave.
Olyphant, PA 570-489-9461
We oer Paul Mitchell, ISOand Wella Hair Products
A Full Service Salon Walk-Ins Welcome
25 %OAll Reg. Priced Services
(Mention this ad)
$50 Spring Color and
Cut Special
BEAUTICIAN SERVICES
HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING
Service - Installation
AJS Mechanical Services, LLC.
Dalton, PA 570-468-0190
We service all brands!
Please call for Spring cleaning specials
ACCOUNTING/TAX
SERVICES
GUTTER REPAIR
& CLEANING
PLUMBING & HEATING
IMPROVEMENT
MASONRY
**AFFORDABLE & HONEST**
Masonry, Bathrooms, Remodeling
Specializing in Retaining Walls,
Concrete and Foundation Repairs
Call Joe 570-815-3864
Masonryplus.net
LANDSCAPING
TOP SOIL/PAVING/EXCAVATION
Shupps Excavating, Paving & Topsoil
570-945-3690
TOPSOIL
Screened soil blended with organic matter, compost & lime.
Soil processed at our topsoil pit. We install new lawns!
PARKING SERVICES
Driveways, Parking Lots & Roadways. Commercial & Residential Projects.
**FREE ESTIMATES**
EXCAVATION
Septic Systems, Foundations & Roadways. Tri-axle trucks
hauling top soil, modifed stone & gravel.
WWW.ShuppsExcavating.com Serving the Community Since 1972
WALTERS BLACKTOPPING
& SEAL COATING
Summer Special
Crack Filling & Patching Line Painting
FREE ESTIMATES
570-562-1069 or 570-840-2934
EXCAVATING
JACOBY EXCAVATING
570-561-7796 or 570-587-1494
Septic and Basement
Water Problems-SOLVED!
ECO CONSTRUCTION LLC
Fully Licensed & Insured
Specializing in decking, siding, roong,
kitchens & bathrooms, additions & more.
In house licensed Architect & Engineer.
Summer Special
10%OFF decking, siding and roong
Senior Discount
www.Ecobsc.com | Find us on Angies List
570-945-EC04 (3264)
ALL PHASES OF ELECTRICAL
No Job Too Small Residential Commercial
New & Emergency Services
Licensed & Insured - PA032422
570-602-7840 CALL 24 HOURS!
ECONOLECTRIC - SINCE 1988
ELECTRICAL
POWER WASHING
REPAIRS
ASPHALT SEALING
BOBS BLACKTOP
Paving: Driveways, Parking Lots,
Patching, Hot Crackller Repairs
Residential
Commercial
PA# 041254
836-3587
ABINGTON GUTTER CLEANING
Servicing the Entire Area
570-586-1003
Prompt Service
Leave a Message
Hunter Decks
of Clarks Summit
Ranch House Wash - $150 Two Story House Wash - $250
Concrete pool sidewalks & patios
Deck Restoration, Power Washing, Stripping, Staining
Custom built decks, Trex deck facelifts,
composite & vinyl decks and railings.
Call Jeff at 570-877-3601
We Are Outdoor Wood Renishing Specialists
Let us make your deck look new. Call Today!
MCDONALDS GREENTHUMB
LANDSCAPING
CALL BRIANAT 570-341-7991
Landscaping Design & Installation
Over 20 Years Professional Experience
Hydro-Seeding, Paver Patios, Walks,
Retaining Walls & Water Gardens
Saiis
Siivici
Iwsraiiariow
Warii Soiriwiis x Tiiarxiwr
VAN FLEET DRILLING CO., INC.
Puowi:
;o-o-1;;o
:o:o Maiii Roao
Dairow, PA 181
ELECTRICAL
REPAIRS
Reasonable Rates
Call John
570-309-1006
PAINTING
PA046618 570-346-1317
Fully Insured No JobToo Small.
K.D. PAINTING SERVICES
Interior/Exterior, Power Washing,
Deck Renishing
SMC CONCRETE & GENERAL
CONSTRUCTION
Retaining Walls, Concrete, Pavers, Garage
Floor Coatings and Overlays
ALL PHASES OF CONSTRUCTION
17 Years Experience | Licensed & Insured
570-430-5728
TREE SPECIALIST
KEYSTONE TREE SPECIALIST
Will remain open in the absence of the late
Robert Bleep, Sr.
The company remains family owned & operated.
We will continue to honor and serve past and present clients.
NEW CLIENTS ARE ALSO WELCOME!
Mention this ad for a 5% discount
Please call 570-341-8714 or 570-906-4487
7
3
1
5
5
4
RAIN GUTTERS
$EAMLE$$ GUTTER$ FOR LE$$
5&6 Seamless K Gutters Installed
& Delivery Service for Contractors
Gutter Cleaning & Leaf Covers Available
Call Bills Home Improvement
570-343-7708 PA031888
Karpentry by Keiper
Specializing in windows, doors, paneling,
decks, kitchens, bathrooms, roong, siding, gutters,
ALL PHASES OF CARPENTRY
Licensed General Contractor.
Call 563-2766
(Quality over volume, one job at a time)
CONSTRUCTION GLASS SERVICES
We do it all!
Auto Commercial Residental
WYOMING AVENUE & NEW STREET
346-0777
Goldate Power Washing
Houses, Decks, Roofs, Sidewalks, Driveways, Commercial
Buildings, Trucks & anything you want cleaned and restored.
CONTACT FOR FREE ESTIMATE!
Dave Goldate
goldatepowerwashing@yahoo.com
570-650-4130
703 Lilac Lane
Clarks Summit, PA 18411
POWER WASHING
PAGE 24 Abington Journal WEDNESDAY JULY 18, 2012
Military,
College Graduate
& Lease Loyalty
Also Available
HOURS:
Mon-Thur 8:30 - 8:00 Fri 8:30 - 5:00 Sat 8:30 - 4:00
THE BIGGEST NAME IN FORD, GIBBONS FORD IS AUTHORIZED TO SERVICE YOUR VEHICLES
CALL 489-4747 OR 1-800-853-4641 TO SCHEDULE AN APPOINTMENT
FULL SERVICE..TIRESALIGNMENTS - MASTER CERTIFIED FORD TECHNICIANS
OPEN MON-FRI 7:30AM-5:00PM SAT 7:30AM-12:00PM
NIGHT DROP OFF BOX
College
& Lease
Also A
THE BIGGEST &
BEST NAME IN FORD
$
20,856
$
202.82/mo. 24 mos.
with $2,554.82 Due at Signing
Automatic
PWR Seat
PWR Windows
AM/FM CD
SYNC Voice
Activated
TIER 0 CREDIT APPROVAL REQUIRED FOR ALL PMTS. ALL LEASE PMTS AND SOME BUY PMTS REQUIRE FMCC FINANCING. LEASE PMTS BASED ON $2,000 CASH DOWN OR TRADE
EQUIVALENT. 1ST PAYMENT, TAX AND TAGS ALSO DUE AT SIGNING. BUY PMTS ARE FOR 72 MONTHS W/ $2,000 CASH DOWN OR TRADE EQUIVALENT. TAX & TAGS ADDITIONAL. OFFER
VALID ON IN STOCK UNITS ONLY. WHILE SUPPLIES LAST. INCENTIVES SET TO EXPIRE 7-31-12
Buy it for
Lease PMT
2012 FORD FUSION SE
Stk 012806
MSRP $24,460
Gibbons Discount -$1,104
Ford Rebates -$2,500
33
MPG
Extra Factory
Rebate Available
On Your Trade In
ATTN: ALL LINCOLN/MERCURY OWNERS
$
33,041
Keyless Entry,
x4 Wheel Drive
PowerWds/ Locks
Trailer Tow Pkg,
Chrome Pkg
V-8 Engine
SYNC Voice
Activated
Reverse Sensing
19
MPG
Stk 012754
MSRP $39,625
Factory Discount -$1,500
Gibbons Discount -$2,584
Ford Rebates -$2,500
TIER 0 CREDIT APPROVAL REQUIRED FOR ALL PMTS. ALL LEASE PMTS AND SOME BUY PMTS REQUIRE FMCC FINANCING. LEASE PMTS BASED ON $2,000 CASH DOWN OR TRADE
EQUIVALENT. 1ST PAYMENT, TAX AND TAGS ALSO DUE AT SIGNING. BUY PMTS ARE FOR 72 MONTHS W/ $2,000 CASH DOWNOR TRADE EQUIVALENT. TAX &TAGS ADDITIONAL. OFFER VALID
ON IN STOCK UNITS ONLY. WHILE SUPPLIES LAST. INCLUDES TRADE REBATE ON PURCHASE. INCENTIVES SET TO EXPIRE 7-31-12
Buy it for
2012 FORD F-150 SC XLT
TIER 0 CREDIT APPROVAL REQUIRED FOR ALL PMTS. ALL LEASE PMTS AND SOME BUY PMTS REQUIRE FMCC FINANCING. LEASE PMTS BASED ON $2,000 CASH DOWN OR TRADE
EQUIVALENT. 1ST PAYMENT, TAX AND TAGS ALSO DUE AT SIGNING. BUY PMTS ARE FOR 72 MONTHS W/ $2,000 CASH DOWN OR TRADE EQUIVALENT. TAX & TAGS ADDITIONAL.
OFFER VALID ON IN STOCK UNITS ONLY. WHILE SUPPLIES LAST. INCENTIVES SET TO EXPIRE 7-31-12
Stk 013027
7 Passenger Seating
Satellite Radio
24
MPG
2012 FORD F-250 SUPERDUTY 4X4 REG. CAB.
950 Main Street, Dickson City, PA. 18519
570-489-4747 1-800-853-4641 Exit 190A Interstate 81 - 1 mile
$
17,037+ tax
Automatic
PWR Windows
PWR Locks
AM/FM CD
Keyless Entry
TIER 0 CREDIT APPROVAL REQUIRED FOR ALL PMTS. ALL LEASE PMTS AND SOME BUY PMTS REQUIRE FMCC FINANCING. LEASE PMTS BASED ON $2,000 CASH DOWN OR TRADE
EQUIVALENT. 1ST PAYMENT, TAX AND TAGS ALSO DUE AT SIGNING. BUY PMTS ARE FOR 72 MONTHS W/ $2,000 CASH DOWN OR TRADE EQUIVALENT. TAX & TAGS ADDITIONAL. OFFER
VALID ON IN STOCK UNITS ONLY. WHILE SUPPLIES LAST. INCENTIVES SET TO EXPIRE 7-31-12
2012 FORD FOCUS SE
38
MPG
MSRP $19,390
Gibbons Discount -$603
Ford Rebate -$1,750
Buy it for
Stk 012839
2013 FORD TAURUS SEL AWD
Darryl Jayne
General Sales Manager
Doug Higgins
Pre-Owned Sales Manager
Stephanie Abraham
Finance Director
Casey Grow
Director of Social Media
Liz Hopkins
Internet Sales
John Orue
Sales Consultant
Don Hull
Sales Consultant
Keith Kime
Sales Consultant
Joe Dickhut
Sales Consultant
Andy Noone
Sales Consultant
Chris Kaczor
Sales Consultant
Kurtis Medeiros
Sales Trainee
TIER 0 CREDIT APPROVAL REQUIRED FOR ALL PMTS. ALL LEASE PMTS AND SOME BUY PMTS REQUIRE FMCC FINANCING. LEASE PMTS BASED ON $2,000 CASH DOWN OR TRADE
EQUIVALENT. 1ST PAYMENT, TAX AND TAGS ALSO DUE AT SIGNING. BUY PMTS ARE FOR 72 MONTHS W/ $2,000 CASH DOWN OR TRADE EQUIVALENT. TAX & TAGS ADDITIONAL. OFFER
VALID ON IN STOCK UNITS ONLY. WHILE SUPPLIES LAST. INCENTIVES SET TO EXPIRE 7-31-12
GIBBONS FORD IS TAKING THE
FINE PRINT OUT OF
AUTOMOBILE ADVERTISING.
ALL LEASE PAYMENTS AND LEASE MONIES DUE AT
SIGNING INCLUDE TAX AND TAGS! THE BUY FOR
PRICES REQUIRE TAX AND TAGS TO BE PAID. OTHER
FORD REBATES MAYBE AVAILABLE IF YOU QUALIFY.
DONT BE FOOLED GET A REAL PAYMENT!
MSRP $35,405
Gibbons Discount -$1,805
Ford Rebates -$1,750
$
31,850
Buy it for
$
379/mo. 36 mos.
with $2,730 Due at Signing
$
215.73/mo. 24 mos.
with $2,567.73 Due at Signing
Lease PMT
Lease PMT
$
407.19/mo. 24 mos.
with $2,567.73 Due at Signing
Stk 013071
$
29,987
Buy it for
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WILKES-BARRE
Mayflower
Crossing
Apartments
570.822.3968
2, 3 & 4
Bedrooms
- Light & bright
open floor plans
- All major
appliances included
- Pets welcome*
- Close to everything
- 24 hour emergency
maintenance
- Short term
leases available
Call TODAY For
AVAILABILITY!!
www.mayflower
crossing.com
Certain Restrictions
Apply*
950 Half Doubles
KINGSTON
Sprague Ave.
2 bedroom, 1 bath,
1st floor duplex,
New w/w carpeting
& hardwood floors.
Convenient to
Wyoming Ave.
Washer/dryer hook-
up, basement
storage. Reduced!
$540/month
+ utilities, security,
lease. NO PETS.
570-793-6294
PARSONS
Furnished 3 bed-
room across from
park. Modern kitchen
& bath. Off street
parking. Fenced in
yard. No Pets. $625
+ utilities & security.
570-704-8730
PLAINS
Spacious 3
bedroom, 1 bath
with Victorian
charm with hard-
wood floors, neutral
decor, stained glass
window, large
kitchen with washer
/dryer hook-up,
off-street parking.
$700 month +
utilities, security &
lease. NO PETS.
570-793-6294
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
WILKES-BARRE
Academy Street
Well maintained in
move-in condition. 6
room house with 3
bedrooms & 1 1/2
baths. Gas forced
air heat. No pets. 1
year lease. Credit
check.$625 + utili-
ties & security. Call
908-510-3879
953Houses for Rent
WILKES-BARRE
3 bedrooms, close
to Kings and
downtown. Includes
range & fridge.
$700/month, first,
last & security.
Tenant pays heat,
electric & water.
Call
718-877-7436 or
718-791-5252
962 Rooms
WEST PITTSTON
Gorgeous, furnished
room for rent in Vic-
torian home. Every-
thing included. Call
570-430-3100
for details
971 Vacation &
Resort Properties
OCEAN CITY .
MARYLAND. Best
selection of afford-
able rentals. Full/
partial weeks. Call
for FREE brochure.
Open daily. Holiday
Real Estate. 1-800-
638-2102. Online
reservations:
www.holidayoc.com
1000
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
1015 Appliance
Service
ECO-FRIENDLY
APPLIANCE TECH.
25 Years Experi-
ence fixing major
appliances: Washer,
Dryer, Refrigerator,
Dishwasher, Com-
pactors. Most
brands. Free phone
advice & all work
guaranteed. No
service charge for
visit. 570-706-6577
1024 Building &
Remodeling
1st. Quality
Construction Co.
Roofing, siding,
gutters, insulation,
decks, additions,
windows, doors,
masonry &
concrete.
Insured & Bonded.
Senior Citizens Discount!
State Lic. # PA057320
570-606-8438
1213 Paving &
Excavating
Mountain Top
PAVING & SEAL
COATING
Patching, Sealing,
Residential/Comm
Licensed & Insured
PA013253
570-868-8375
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
1339 Window
Service
PJs Window
Cleaning &
Janitorial
Services
Windows, Gutters,
Carpets, Power
washing and more.
INSURED/BONDED.
570-283-9840
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