THE SCIENCE LAB

Make & Do Activity Kit

White from coloured light
Using coloured cellophane and torches you can create white light by mixing three colours together. Explore the differences between coloured light and coloured pigments.

Time: 10 minutes + Difficulty: Hint: Create a rich coloured light by
folding the cellophane into lots of layers.
the end of each torch 1. Cover with a different coloured cellophane. Secure with rubber bands. Try to smooth any wrinkles from the cellophane. sure your power 2. Make button is not covered. If you’re using thin cellophane you will get better colour if you fold the cellophane to create 3- 4 layers. your torches on a 3. Position table facing a white wall as

What you will need:
• 3 torches • red, blue and green cellophane - 20 x 20cm • sticky tape or 3 rubber bands • optional: a small box

shown so that all 3 coloured lights intersect. The torches can also just be held above a white tabletop. the 3 circles of light 4. Where intersect you will find a patch of white. (Note: An absolute white is difficult to achieve). experiment with 5. Now mixing colours; red and green, blue and green, red and blue.

many different colours 6. How can you make?

500 Harris St Ultimo Tel: 02 6217 0111 This work is licensed under the Creative POK346 Box K346 Haymarket NSW 1238 http://play.powerhousemuseum.com This work is licensed under a Creative Commons AttributionPO Box Haymarket NSW 1238 Commons Attribution-NonCommercialAustralia Tel: 02 9217 0111 NonCommercial 3.0 Australia (CC BY-NC 3.0 AU) Australia ShareAlikeLicence 2.5 License.

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THE SCIENCE LAB

Make & Do Activity Kit

White from coloured light

Page 2

What else can I do? What’s going on?
White light Red, yellow and blue are called primary colours. You can mix these coloured lights together to make almost any other colour. When red, green and blue lights are mixed together, white light can seen. Secondary colours When two primary coloured lights overlap they will produce secondary colours. Red and blue make magenta. Red and green make yellow. Green and blue make cyan. Pigments and light When you mix coloured light you will notice they produce different colours to when you mix the same colours of paints. For example when you mix red and green light it makes yellow. When you mix red and green paint you will get brown! Compare pigment and light Try mixing some primary coloured paints to see the differences between coloured pigments and coloured light. When you mix pigments like paint you can also produce tertiary colours! Primary and secondary colours experiment Use the worksheet entitled ‘Primary colour mixer’ for step by step instruction to do this experiment.

500 Harris St. Ultimo Creative Commons Licence for is use of this workthe Creative 500 Harris St Ultimo Tel: 02 6217 0111 This work licensed under PO PO Box K346 Haymarket NSW 1238 Commons Attribution-NonCommercialBox K346 Haymarket NSW 1238 http://play.powerhousemuseum.com This work is licensed under a Creative Commons AttributionAustralia ShareAlike 2.5 License. Australia Tel: 02 9217 0111 NonCommercial 3.0 Australia Licence (CC BY-NC 3.0 AU) http://play.powerhousemuseum.com http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/au/

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