You are on page 1of 2

Research Process Model for Classroom Projects & Competitions

KWhat do I Know? WWhat do I Want to know? FHow do I Find out? Literature review, research area, topic, context Research Questions Method: What is the design of my study? Who will I question? What method will I use for data collection? Results: data and data analysis Conclusions: Answer your research questions. Whats new? How does it apply to what is already known? Conclusions: How can my study inform next research steps?

LWhat did I Learn? UHow do I Use what I learned?

NWhat will I do Next time?

Guided Inquiry model adapted from Kuhlthau, C., Maniotes, L. K., & Caspari, A. K. (2007). Guided inquiry: Learning in the 21st century. Libraries Unlimited. Representation of the research process model adapted from Blaxter, L., Hughes, C., & Tight, M. (2006). How to research. Open University Press, pp. 8-9

Mirah J. Dow, BSE, MLS, PhD mdow@emporia.edu slim.emporia.edu Bridges to the Future! Teaching Information Literacy Across Standards and Institutions (Kane, Story-Anderson, Ternes, & Dow) Kansas Library Conference, October 10, 2013, Topeka, KS

Page 1

Two Stages of Research for Classroom Projects & Competitions Student Content Teacher Librarian

Stage One: Preparation


LITERATURE CONTEXT

Stage Two: Experimental Stage DATA CONTEXT

Topic* Observation* Question(s)* Hypothesis Design Conduct Analysis Conclusions Communication*

*Steps for librarian assistance during literature phase include searching literature for current, multiple sources of authority on the topic (problem to be resolved), discussion of publications in light of students observations, and to determine new research questions to be answered by the student (with assistance). Steps for librarian assistance during data phase include report writing, presentation development, and multi-media sharing of results. To a classroom teacher-school librarian partnership, the classroom teacher brings expert knowledge of specific content areas and assumes responsibility for determining what, when, and how to teach specific aspects of the content. . . The school librarian brings expert knowledge of resources and assumes responsibility for facilitating information literacy instruction in the context of the content area. Through information literacy instruction, students learn to recognize information needs; search for, access and evaluate information; and use information to develop and communicate new ideas for resolution of human problems (Dow, Vietti-Okane, & Davis, p. 40).
Reference Dow, M. J., Davis, T., & Vietti-Okane, A. (2013). Influencing instructional partnerships inpre-service elementary education teachers. In M. J. Dow (Ed.), School Libraries Matter: Views From the Research. Santa Barbara, CA: Libraries Unlimited.

Mirah J. Dow, BSE, MLS, PhD mdow@emporia.edu slim.emporia.edu Bridges to the Future! Teaching Information Literacy Across Standards and Institutions (Kane, Story-Anderson, Ternes, & Dow) Kansas Library Conference, October 10, 2013, Topeka, KS

Page 2