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Thursday, May 8, 2014 Vol. 132, No. 40 Stoughton, WI ConnectStoughton.

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Courier Hub
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Motorcycle Ride: Registration 11:00 until noon
(return by 4:00) - $20 registration fee
Char Nelson Entertainer 5:00-6:00 p.m.
Back Country Roads 7:00-10:00 p.m.
RD Benet
For Multiple Sclerosis
Saturday, May 10th
Check out
www.rdbenetride.com
Come for the ride or come for the music,
but please come and support a great cause!
714 Taylor Lane - Stoughton, WI

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Stoughton Area School District
District embraces new math program
SCOTT DE LARUELLE
Unified Newspaper Group
Of all the courses students can
take, perhaps none can affect their
futures more than math, as many
of tomorrows jobs, like it or not,
will require math knowledge.
Looki ng t o i ncr eas e t he
students math abilities, dis-
trict officials are switching more
courses to the Common Core
State Standard (CCSS) new math
benchmarks for t he 2014-15
school year and beyond. Based
on how two pilot programs have
gone this year, they are excited
about the change.
At Monday ni ght s school
board meeting, district direc-
tor of curriculum and instruction
Judy Singletary gave the board
a progress report on the change,
a process that started for the dis-
trict in the 2011-12 year, when
they were first introduced to the
Common Core math standards.
They quickly realized there was
some work to be done in switch-
ing focus.
They were quite different
than Wisconsin model academic
standards in math, and we began
our study, she said. We prog-
ress from one grade into the next
and build on foundational and
fundamental things that start in
kindergarten and first-grade. The
emphasis there has been awe-
inspiring. When you see the work
the kids do, youll say, Wow,
thats pretty impressive.
Last year, study teams com-
prising teachers and staff worked
Opera singer
back to perform
BILL LIVICK
Unified Newspaper Group
New York opera singer Jeni
Houser ret urns t o her nat i ve
Stoughton on Sunday to give a
r eci t al at Chr i st
Lutheran Church.
She will sing with
colleague Courtney
Miller, of Middle-
ton. Pianist Kristin
Ihde will accompa-
ny the pair. Houser
and Miller met sing-
ing with Virginia
Opera last season,
and will also perform together in
upstate New York this summer at
the Glimmerglass Festival.
At Christ Lutheran Church,
the pair will perform opera arias,
duets, art song and musical theater
in a show that will last about one
hour.
Houser, the daughter of David
Houser and Emily Osborn, last
performed a recital here in 2009 at
the Stoughton Opera House.
At the time, she told the Hub
that singing in her hometown
would help her to feel a little
less nervous because theres a lot
of support there from family and
friends.
Houser spent a couple of years
prior to 2009 performing in New
York City. The following year
she performed in Italy in an opera
called, La Musica Lirica.
If you go
Who: Jeni Houser and Courtney
Miller, accompanied by Kristin
Ihde
When: 2:30 p.m. Sunday, May
11
Where: Christ Lutheran Church,
700 County Hwy. B
Admission: no charge
Houser
Turn to Houser/Page 20
Turn to Math/Page 20
dream
After 35-year wait, Connor
cycles cross-country in
solo adventure
BILL LIVICK
Unified Newspaper Group
As unl i kel y as i t
seems, Mike Connor
thinks almost anyone
could do it.
T h e l o n g t i m e
St ought on r esi dent
spent 68 days last sum-
mer bicycling across
the United States, from
Seaside, Ore., to Port-
land, Maine.
Thats 3,696 miles,
from June 5 to Aug.
11.
Whats more, Con-
nor, 56, made the solo
bike trip entirely self-
supported. He put pan-
niers on his bike, car-
rying a tent, sleeping
bag and a few other
essentials.
Perhaps self-sup-
ported is a tad mis-
leading, because more
t han anyt hi ng, t he
journey renewed my
faith in humankind,
Connor said.
That was the best
part for me. In my blog
one day I wrote, I eat,
I sleep, I pedal and I
meet nice people in
between. Thats real-
ly what it came down
to, he said. Theres
nice people all the way
across North Ameri-
ca.
Connor doesnt have
any plans for a similar
trip this year, but hell
be conducting a mini-
course Tuesday, June
10, at UW-Madisons
Union South, where
hell talk about his
trip and long-distance
cycling.
Riding the
Photos submitted
Above, Stoughton resident
Mike Connor celebrates the
start of his cross-country
bike trip on June 5 last year
by dipping his feet (and bike
tires) in the Pacific Ocean at
Seaside, Oregon.
At left, a view from the Going-
to-the-Sun Highway at Glacier
National Park in Montana.
At right, Connor crosses the
Continental Divide at Rogers
Pass in Montana.
Turn to Connor/Page 19
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May 8, 2014 Courier Hub ConnectStoughton.com
Fitchburg Days kicks off Soon!
Friday May 16 Sunday May 18
McKee Farms Park - Fitchburg
Friday
6pm music by Pilot
9pm FIREWORKS light up the sky by Krueger Pyrotechnics
9:30pm - 12am a romping good time with Pat McCurdy
Saturday
6:30pm - 9:30pm music by The Kissers.
10pm - 12am music by Black 47
Thrilling carnival rides, a childrens tent with tons of fun
activities for kids of all ages. Food by many local vendors. Saturday and
Sunday events include: Heartland Farms Animal Sanctuary petting zoo
Childrens Tent and the Police Auction.

DONT MISS IT!
P R O O F S H E E T
www.tingalls.com | p. 608.268.5525 | f. 608.268.5526 | 2939 S. Fish Hatchery Road, Ste 100, Fitchburg, WI 53711
Client: Fitchburg Days 2014
Project: Logo updated to 2014
Date: 2/27/14
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Community Banking Since 1904
McFarland State Bank
Downtown Stoughton Ofce: 207 South Forrest Street, | 608.873.6681
Lake Kegonsa Ofce: 3162 County Road B | 608.873.2010
www.msbonline.com
NMLS# 596586
*Purchase transactions only. The following loan programs are not eligible for the closing cost credit: Federal VA,
FHA, Rural Development, WHEDA, Investment Property Loans and Construction Loans. The offer applies to loans
with an application date prior to August 1, 2014 and a closing date prior to November 1, 2014. The $500 closing cost
credit cannot exceed the actual amount of closing costs, prepaid interest and escrow reserves. This includes if the
credit is combined with a seller closing cost credit. First mortgages only (offer does not apply to 2nd mortgages or
home equity lines of credit). Must have an open, active McFarland State Bank checking account PRIOR to closing.
The checking account must have direct deposit set up for income or auto pay of mortgage payment PRIOR to
the loan closing. The credit will be applied at the time of the loan closing and will be refected on the Settlement
Statement (HUD-1). Not valid with any other offers.
McFarland State Bank can help you open the door to you dream home today! With local decision
making and local servicing - we can get your mortgage approved in minutes, rather than days
or weeks! We offer a variety of loan options to choose from including xed rate mortgages and
adjustable rate mortgages. Visit our website, call or e-mail one of our mortgage professionals to
answer any of your questions or to ask for advice. We are here to help!
Community Banking Since 1904
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OFF YOUR
CLOSING COSTS.
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River Bluff gets handle on brain research
Students in Tom Palmers
science class enjoyed some
hands-on learning April 30
thanks to a program conduct-
ed by University of Wiscon-
sin-Madison assistant profes-
sor and brain researcher Brian
Baldo. He talked about the
parts of the brain and how, for
example, vision is processed
(signals from the retina must
make their way through the
eye to the brain).
The program included an
opportunity to actually hold
a couple of specimens and
ask questions. It was a rare
enough experience that some
eighth-graders used cell
phone cameras to take self-
ie photos with perhaps the
first human brain they could
hold in their hands.
In March, Baldo conducted
similar presentations with
eighth-graders in Melissa
Maags Science class. This
is the second year that Baldo
has come to River Bluff to
give these informational pre-
sentations.
[Its] not every day you
can hold a real human brain,
says Palmer.
The timing of the presen-
tation also worked out well:
students took their unit exam
on the brain on May 2.
Photo submitted
River Bluff eighth-grader Hunter Zaemisch points out the parts of the human brain while classmate
Grace Link looks on during a visit from University of Wisconsin-Madison brain researcher Brian Baldo
on April 30. Baldo has visited eighth-grade science classes to talk about the brain and even give stu-
dents a chance to hold a couple during his presentations.
Families displaced after fire
Faulty alarm
delayed response
MARK IGNATOWSKI
Unified Newspaper Group
An apartment fire dis-
placed several Stoughton
families last Wednesday.
The result could have
been worse, given that an
alarm system in the four-
uni t compl ex fai l ed t o
activate, Stoughton Fire
Department deputy fire
chief Scott Wegner said.
Its a good thing that
f i r e di dn t happen at
night, Wegner said.
The fire started around
3 p.m. in a garage in the
four-pl ex on t he 2200
block of Jackson Street
and spread to one unit in
the building. Wegner said
a man and an 8-year-old
boy were home at the time
of the fire and came down-
stairs to find thick, black
smoke in their unit.
The smoke det ect or
didnt work, Wegner said,
and the fire alarm pull
didnt, either.
They had to go outside
and flag somebody down
to call for help, Wegner
said.
St ought on sent t hree
engines, a ladder truck, its
squad and a command car
to the fire. A McFarland
engine also responded.
According to a news
release from the Ameri-
can Red Cross, vol un-
teers helped two families
displaced by the fire. No
significant injuries were
reported, but one cat died
in the fire.
The apartment manage-
ment company was able to
provide the families with
vacant apartments, the
release read.
The fire caused upwards
of $50, 000 in damage,
Wegner estimated. The
alarm system also required
repair Thursday. Families
were allowed back into
their apartments the next
day.
Wegner said the cause of
the fire was undetermined
as of Tuesday. The depart-
ment is waiting for alarm
t est i ng records before
completing a report.
Photo by Kimberly Wethal
An apartment fire on Jackson Street caused damage to two units
in a four-unit apartment building last week. The cause of the fire
is still undetermined.
May 8, 2014 Courier Hub ConnectStoughton.com
3
Apply at
900 Nygaard St
Stoughton, WI
or email
Human Resources at
alb-restaurants@charter.net
Now Hiring
Members of Management
For our Madison Area
Locations
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Follow our Growing Up Healthy blog
for tips to keep kids active, safe and
healthy this summer. Weekly prize
drawings are available from Memorial
Day to Labor Day.
Go to blogs.uwhealth.org/kids and
subscribe to Growing Up Healthy today.
Win Weekly
Prizes!
CH-39495-14
UN347545
Map courtesy City of Stoughton
The Common Council will vote Tuesday to annex approximately
19.5 acres of land near Hwy. 51 north of Kettle Park West.
Annexation vote
set for May 13
What: Annexation of 19.5
acres just north of Kettle Park
West
When: 7 p.m. Tuesday, May 13
Where: Council chambers,
Public Safety Building, 321 S.
Fourth Street.
Past votes: Approval from
Wisconsin Department of
Administration; Stoughton
Planning Commission 4-0 vote
recommending approval; Council
first reading received unanimous
support
About the land: The proposed
annexation area along the east
side Hwy. 51, between Jackson
Street and Buckingham Road.
The site is home to Dane County
Auto, Stark Automotive and a
vacant car dealership just north
of Jackson Street.
After the annexation: A small
sliver of land near Jackson Street
will be transferred to the city
for future road improvements
on Jackson Street. Businesses
will be able to use Hult Road for
access. The city will make an
effort to bring water and sewer
service to the area.
Costs: The city will collect
about $10,725 related to costs
for bring the properties into the
Urban Services Area. The prop-
erty owners will be assessed for
any future sewer and water con-
nections that benefit their prop-
erties. Costs for those projects
could be about $775,000, city
documents show. Some of the
costs would also be assessed to
Kettle Park West developers.
Mark Ignatowski
City of Stoughton
Rutland man shot while hunting
A 46-year-old Rutland
man was shot while hunt-
ing turkeys May 2, near
Hwy. 14 and Hwy. A.
According to a news
rel ease from t he Dane
County Sheriffs Office:
Th e ma n a n d h i s
15-year-old daughter were
hunting in the same area
as a 50-year-old man from
Stoughton around 7 a.m.
last Friday. The two par-
ties were unaware that
they were hunting in the
same space.
The St ought on man
fired one round from his
shotgun at what he thought
was a turkey and struck
(the Rutland man) from
approximately 50 yards
away, the release read.
The Stoughton man ren-
dered first aid until help
arrived. The Rutland man
was taken to a local hos-
pital with serious, but non-
life threatening injuries.
Sheriffs deputies arrest-
ed the Stoughton man on
a charge of endangering
safety by use of a dan-
gerous weapon. He was
booked and released.
The Wisconsin Depart-
ment of Natural Resources
is investigating the inci-
dent.
Mark Ignatowski
Your opinion is something
we always want to hear.
Call 873-6671 or at
connectstoughton.com
WERE
ALL
EARS
Questions?
Comments?
Story Ideas?
Let us know how
were doing.
4
May 8, 2014 Courier Hub ConnectStoughton.com
Courier Hub
Thursday, May 8, 2014 Vol. 132, No. 40
USPS No. 1049-0655
Periodical Postage Paid, Stoughton, WI and additional offices.
Published weekly on Thursday by the Unified Newspaper Group,
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POSTMASTER: Send Address Corrections to
Stoughton Courier Hub, 135 W. Main St., Ste. 102, Stoughton, WI 53589.
Phone: 608-873-6671
Fax: 608-873-3473
e-mail: stoughtoneditor@wcinet.com
ConnectStoughton.com
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Stoughton Courier Hub
Oregon Observer Verona Press
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ASSOCIATION
General manager
David Enstad
david.enstad@wcinet.com
Advertising
Catherine Stang
stoughtonsales@wcinet.com
Classifieds
Diane Beaman
hubclassified@wcinet.com
Circulation
Carolyn Schultz
ungcirculation@wcinet.com
News
Jim Ferolie
stoughtoneditor@wcinet.com
Sports
Jeremy Jones
ungsportseditor@wcinet.com
Website
Victoria Vlisides
communityreporter@wcinet.com
Reporters
Scott Girard, Bill Livick, Anthony Iozzo,
Mark Ignatowski, Scott De Laruelle
Record number turn out
for Kiwanis Disc Golf
The 10th annual Kiwanis
Disc Golf Rally was held
Saturday, May 3, at the
Kiwanis Disc Golf Course
in Amundsen Park.
Despi t e poor weat her
throughout the week, Moth-
er Nature came through
Saturday with a sunny and
breezy day for the event.
Osprey, swallows and
pelicans soared overhead
as a record 35 competitors
teed off in five categories
based on age and skill level.
A number of families
competed in the event as
the club offered free entry
for parents accompanying
youth entrants.
Twe n t y - o n e o f t h e
ent r ant s wer e 18 and
younger.
The winners were:
Male Open (18 holes):
1st: Barry Flesch, 51; 2nd:
Thomas Roltgen, 55; 3rd:
Jason Scherck, 57;
Female Open (9 holes):
1st: Haven Polich, 39; 2nd:
Kezia Miller, 42; 3rd: Mol-
ly Staats, 45
Beginners 19 and over
(9 holes): 1st: Tim Markle
Beginners 13-18: 1st:
Alex Pigarelli
Beginners 12 and under:
1st: Conner Derr
Two disc golfers sink their putts. It was a super day for disc golf in Stoughton. Record numbers turned out for the 10th annual tournament.
A group of young ladies tee off on Hole 9 Saturday.
Photos by Mark Ignatowski
Unused drug
collection
Stoughton hosted its annual
unused drug take-back day
late last month. Volunteers
collected unused medications
and needles from residents in
order to keep the items from
ending up in the wrong hands.
The city also has a permanent
drug collection box located at
the front of the police depart-
ment office, 321 S. Fourth St.
May 8, 2014 Courier Hub ConnectStoughton.com
5
River Bluff Science Club gets hands-on biotech
Eighth-graders in River
Bluff Middle Schools new
Sci ence Cl ub got some
hands-on experience in the
biotechnology field thanks
to a special field trip.
The club took a field trip
last month to the Biotech-
nology Resource Center
and the Geology Museum
on the UW-Madison cam-
pus. Students did a foren-
sic activity where they had
to determine the identity of
an alien blood sample using
gel electrophoresis.
St udent s al so l earned
how to measure and move
liquids using a micropipette
and analyzed salmon fish
DNA and extracted DNA
from wheat germ.
Students also explored
the Geology Museum and
took a peek into Wiscon-
sin's deep history. Students
viewed minerals that glow,
rock and fossil collections
and were able to touch
rocks from a time when
there were volcanoes in
Wisconsin. Students also
saw corals, jellyfish and
other sea creatures that used
to live and swim where we
now walk; and stand under
the tusks of a mastodon
while imagining themselves
back in the Ice Age. Also
on display at the Geology
Museum were models of a
Wisconsin cave, dinosaur
fossils and meteorites.
The club, available to
eighth-graders, started after
several students earlier this
school year asked if they
could start one, says River
Bluff Science teacher Tom
Palmer, who is a co-adviser
to the club along with Tech-
nology Education teacher
Jessie Hager.
The cl ub meet s once
a month after school for
STEM (Science, Technolo-
gy, Engineering and Math)-
related activities. The club,
now with 20 members, has
engaged in activities with
series and parallel electrical
circuits and explored snap
circuits.
They will build mod-
el rockets from kits and
launch them in May.
The clubs next field trip
will be May 12 to the UW-
Madison Planetarium, UW
Washburn Observatory &
UW Space Place on Park
Street. The students will
make a telescope from a
kit (Galileoscope) at Space
Place. The cost will be $17
to each student but there's
scholarship money avail-
able for those who can' t
afford it. Once they build it,
it's theirs to keep.
Take a trip to Neverland with
St. Anns students this weekend
St. Ann students will per-
form Peter Pan Jr. at the
Stoughton Opera House at
7 p.m. Friday, May 9, and
1 p.m. Saturday, May 10.
The 90-minute play fol-
lows the high-flying adven-
tures of Peter Pan who
whi sks Wendy and her
siblings away to Never-
land to the dismay of Tin-
ker Bell. Along the way,
they meet the Lost Boys,
Mermaids, Indians, Fair-
i es, and t he i nf amous
pi rat es l ed by Capt ai n
Hook and his mate, Smee.
Tickets will be sold at the
door. They are $7 for adults
and $4 for children 10 and
under as well as $4 for
senior citizens. For more
information, contact Diane
Neumeyer at 235-3274.
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Thank you to the dedicated employees that provide care
for the residents of Oregon Manor. Your dedication and
enthusiasm makes our facility a home. You truly make
a difference in their lives. Have a wonderful National
Nursing Home Week Celebration!
THANK YOU!
UN349174
VFW Badger Post 328 Inc.
200 Veterans Rd., Stoughton
Friday Night
All-You-Can-Eat Fish Fry
Dine-in only. Regular menu also available
Come in and check out new updated dining area and lunch special.
Purchase 8 daily Lunch Specials get the 9th free.
Month of May Free dessert with meal
Juke Box Night
Up Coming
Saturday, May 17 9:00-11:00 a.m.
Poker Run Benet For Juvenile Diabetes
Every Friday Night Meat Rafe starts at 5 p.m.
Every Thursday night Bingo starting at 7:00 p.m.
Serving Lunch Tuesday-Friday 11:00 a.m.-1:30 p.m.
Open to the Public
www.stoughtonvfw.org Like us on Facebook
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If you go
What: St. Anns School
production of Peter Pan
Jr.
When: 7 p.m. Friday,
May 9, and 1 p.m.
Saturday, May 10
Where: Stoughton Opera
House
Info: 235-3274

Submitted photo
St. Ann students, from left: Megan Howard as Wendy, Carson
Roisum as Hook, Noah Neumeyer as Smee, Matthew Gille as Peter
Pan and Margaret Ross as Tinker Bell.
Photo submitted
River Bluff Middle School student Sophie Fjelstad checks out the
Biotechnology Resource Center and the Geology Museum on the
UW-Madison campus April 8 during a Science Club field trip. The stu-
dents did a forensic activity where they had to determine the identity of
an alien blood sample using gel electrophoresis. Students also learned
how to measure and move liquids using a micropipette and also
analyzed salmon fish DNA and extracted DNA from wheat germ. The
Science Club has about 20 members.
SHS student wins
National Merit Scholarship
A St ought on Hi gh
School senior received the
National Merit Scholar-
ship for $2,500.
Amara McCune, who
has been well-decorated
academi cal l y whi l e at
SHS, is one of 2,500 high
school students to receive
the award nationwide.
The winners were cho-
sen from a field of 15,000
finalists for their combina-
tion of accomplishments,
skills and potential for
success in rigorous col-
lege studies, according to
a press release from the
National Merit Scholar-
ship Corporation.
A committee of college
admissions officers and
high school counselors
selected the winners using
their academic records,
standardized test scores,
contributions and leader-
ship in school and commu-
nity activities, essays from
the finalists and a recom-
mendation from a high
school official.
Ea r l i e r t h i s y e a r ,
McCune won $1,000 as a
semifinalist in a national
science competition. She
was also featured in the
Hub last October for her
six-month asteroid-track-
i ng program from l ast
summer.
Carter wins Kohl Fellowship
SHS sci ence t eacher
Cindy Carter is a recipient
of a 2014 Kohl Fellowship
Award.
The program recogniz-
es and supports teaching
excellence and innovation
in Wisconsin.
Carter has been teaching
in the district since August
2004. She has a Mas-
ters of Science degree in
chemistry from UW-Mad-
ison and been a coach on
the high school academic
teams. She is known for
her ability to innovate in
the classroom, her work
ethic and her contagious
enthusiasm for learning.
St udent s devel oped
their own aspirations for
knowledge after seeing
Mrs. Carters determina-
tion for learning, wrote
a student who nominated
Carter for the honor. She
demonstrates that knowl-
edge is indispensable, and
that learning can become
an i nt egr at ed par t of
everyday life.
Mrs. Carters excite-
ment and eagerness keeps
st udent s i nvol ved and
focused in class discus-
sions. She is able to chal-
lenge students academi-
cally while helping them
to grow personally, where
learning and knowledge is
central to benefitting both
the students and the com-
munity.
Annually, the Founda-
tion awards 100 Wiscon-
sin teachers with $1,000
Kohl Fellowship grants,
and each Kohl Fellowship
recipients school receives
a matching $1,000 grant.
Recipients professional
accomplishments are cel-
ebrated at a recognition
luncheon in the spring.
Carter was officially pre-
sented with her honor dur-
ing that luncheon in early
April.
- Summer Care 7am - 6pm
- Before/After School Care
- Non-Profit Educational,
Growing Center on Site
- Friend us on Facebook!
(608) 873-9939 fort.littlegreen@gmail.com
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the option to renew your
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electronically with our
secure site at:
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online!
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6
May 8, 2014 Courier Hub ConnectStoughton.com
Coming up
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400 N. Morris, Stoughton
(608) 873-5651
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Dr. Thor Anderson
Dr. Thane Anderson
1520 Vernon St.
Stoughton, WI
A Life
Celebration Center
873-4590
1358 Hwy 51, Stoughton
Mike Smits Dale Holzhuter Jodi Corbit
Laurie Dybevik, Pre-Need Specialist Paul Selbo, Office Manager
Place your ad
here weekly!
Call 873-6671
to advertise in the
Courier Hub Church Page.
Place your ad
here weekly!
Call 873-6671
to advertise in the
Courier Hub Church Page.
221 Kings Lynn Rd.
Stoughton, WI 53589
(608) 873-8888
www.anewins.com
Thought for the week
Bahai Faith
For information: Alfred Skerpan, 877-0911
or Gail and Greg Gagnon, 873-9225
us.bahai.org Stoughton study classes.
Bible Baptist Church
2095 Hwy. W, Utica
873-7077 423-3033
Sunday: 10 a.m. - Worship; 6 p.m. - Worship
Christ Lutheran Church
700 Cty Tk B, Stoughton
873-9353
e-mail: office@clcstoughton.org
Sunday: 8 and 10:30 a.m. Traditional Worship
9:10 a.m. Family Express and Sunday School
Christ the King Community Church
401 W. Main St., Stoughton 877-0303
christthekingcc.org - Sunday: 10 a.m. - Worship
Christian Assembly Church
1844 Williams Drive, Stoughton
873-9106
Saturday, 6 p.m. worship; Sunday, 10 a.m. worship
The Church of Jesus Christ
of Latter-Day Saints
825 S. Van Buren, Stoughton
877-0439
Missionaries 877-0696
Sunday: 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. Sunday school and Primary
Cooksville Lutheran Church
Office: 882-4408 - Sunday: 9:30 a.m. - Worship
and Sunday School
Covenant Lutheran Church
1525 N. Van Buren St., Stoughton 873-7494
covluth@chorus.net covluth.org
Saturday: 5:30 p.m. Come As You Are Worship
Sunday: 9 & 10:30 a.m. Worship Sunday School:
9:30 a.m.
Ezra Church
ezrachurch.com
129 E Main St, Stoughton | 834-9050 - Sunday: 9
and 10:30 a.m.
First Lutheran Church
310 E. Washington, Stoughton 873-7761
flcstoughton.com - Sunday: 8:30 & 10 a.m. worship
Fulton Church
9209 Fulton St., Edgerton
884-8512
Worship services 8, 10:30 a.m. -
coffee hour 9 a.m. - Sunday School 9:30 a.m. -
Varsity 12:07 p.m. - AWANA 3 p.m.
www.fultonchurch.org
Good Shepherd By The Lake
Lutheran Church
1860 Hwy. 51 at Lake Kegonsa, Stoughton
873-5924
Sunday Worship: 8:00 and 10:30 a.m.
Education Hour for all ages: 9:15 a.m.
LakeView Church
2200 Lincoln Ave., Stoughton
873-9838
lakevc.org
Sunday: 9, 10:45 a.m. - Worship
Seventh Day Baptist
Church Of Albion
616 Albion Rd., Edgerton
Worship Saturday 11- Sabbath School 10
Fellowship Meal follows service on first Sabbath
Phone: 561-7450 or email: albionsdb@gmail.com
forministry.com/USWISDBGCASD1
Stoughton Baptist Church
Corner of Williams Dr. & Cty. B, Stoughton
873-6517 Sunday: 10:30 a.m. - Worship;
6 p.m. - Evening Service
St. Ann Catholic Church
323 N. Van Buren St., Stoughton
Weekday Mass: At Nazareth House and
St. Anns Church - call 873-6448 or 873-7633.
Weekend Mass: Saturday - 5:15 p.m.;
Sunday - 8 and 10:30 a.m.
April 17 mass 7 p.m., April 18 service 1 p.m., April
19 mass 8 p.m. April 20 8 a.m.,10:30 a.m. masses
United Methodist of Stoughton
525 Lincoln Avenue, Stoughton
E-mail: Stoughtonumc@Wisconsinumc.org
Sunday: 8 a.m. - Short Service;
10 a.m. - Full Worship
West Koshkonong Lutheran Church
1911 Koshkonong, Stoughton
Sunday: 10:30 a.m. - Worship
Western Koshkonong
Lutheran Church
2633 Church St., Cottage Grove,
Sunday: 9:30 a.m. worship
11 a.m. Bible study
Admit When Youre Wrong
One of the barriers to good relations is when
people dig their heels in and refuse to admit
when they are wrong. Many an argument could
be shortened by the offending party simply
admitting his offense and sincerely asking for
forgiveness. In fact, many arguments could be
avoided by apologizing or admitting ahead of
time that you might be wrong. It is always a
good disarming tactic to let people know that
you could be wrong about something, or to
offer your apologies in advance for what you are
about to do. Moreover, people who refuse to
apologize even when they know they are wrong,
or who offer insincere apologies are seen as
pride-filled, dishonest, and not interested in
smooth relations. If you want to get along with
your family, friends and colleagues, be quick
to admit when youre wrong. This advice also
applies to your relationship with God. That is,
admit to God when you have sinned and accept
His forgiveness just as readily.
Christopher Simon via Metro News Service
Whoever conceals his transgressions will not
prosper, but he who confesses and forsakes
them will obtain mercy.
Proverbs 28:13
Submit your community
calendar and coming up
items online:
ConnectStoughton.com
Community calendar
Thursday, May 8
6:30 p.m., Thursdays
With Murder, featuring
The Butler Did It! at
library
Friday, May 9
7:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.,
farmers market - Every
Friday from May through
October at the Stoughton
Plaza parking lot
Tuesday, May 13
1-2 p.m., Exploring
world cultures:
Venezuela, senior center
6:30-8 p.m., Grief in
the workplace Agrace,
5395 E. Cheryl Parkway,
Madison.
Wednesday, May 14
Noon, SHS Norwegian
Dancers performance,
State Capitol
7 p.m., honors nights,
Stoughton High School
auditorium
Thursday, May 15
11 a.m., Fox Prairie stu-
dents celebrate Syttende
Mai by singing Norwegian
songs at the Stoughton
Senior Center
Noon, presentation on
COPD and breathing eas-
ier with age, Stoughton
Hospital, 873-2356
6:30 p.m., Sandhill
Elementary School third
grade concert
Friday, May 16
Syttende Mai festival,
visit stoughtonwi.com/
syttendemai/default.asp
for details
Saturday, May 17
1 p.m., River Bluff
Middle School band per-
formance, Syttende Mai
parade
Syttende Mai festival,
visit stoughtonwi.com/
syttendemai/default.asp
for details
Sunday, May 18
Syttende Mai festival,
visit stoughtonwi.com/
syttendemai/default.asp
for details
Noon to 3 p.m.,
Stoughton High School
band performs at
Syttende Mai parade
Monday, May 19
5:30-6:30 p.m., The
Gathering Table free
community dinner, Senior
Center, 248 W. Main St.,
206-1178
Tuesday, May 20
7-8 p.m., Stoughton/
McFarland/Oregon Relay
For Life team captain
meeting, Hanson Room
of the EMS building,
520 South Fourth St.,
Stoughton
Wednesday, May 21
6:30 p.m., library board
meeting, library
Thursday, May 22
7 p.m., River Bluff
Middle School choir con-
cert
Monday, May 26
8:45-11 a.m., SHS band
performs at Memorial Day
parade
Monday, June 2
5:30-6:30 p.m., The
Gathering Table free
community dinner, Senior
Center, 248 W. Main St.,
206-1178
Caregiver group
We will talk about the topic of care in our later years.
Frailty and failing health will come to all of us if we live
long enough. Our discussion will focus on how to have a
relaxed talk with the older adult in the family about the
future.
We are all on this same journey, just at different stages
for each of us. So this discussion is one we can share in as
equals. Whether you are an older caregiver or a younger
adult with concerns for older relatives, this discussion is
for you.
The Caregiver Groups next meeting will be on Thurs-
day, May 8, 4:30-6 p.m. at the senior center.
Vidalia onion sale
People can pick up their onions at the American Legion
Post 59 from 1-5 p.m. Friday, May 9 and 7:30 a.m. to 4:30
p.m. Saturday, May 10.
Onions may also be purchased at the farmers market on
May 9 or May 10 at Legion stands located throughout the
area. The Legion will also sell salad dressing, steak sauces
and Vidalia relishes.
Hunger Food Drive
Saturday, May 10 marks the 22nd anniversary of the
National Association of Letter Carriers Stamp Out Food
Hunger Drive. Carriers across the country will collect
non-perishable food donations to go to local food pantries.
Customers who receive bags in the mail are encouraged
to use them by leaving a non-perishable food donation in
the bag by their mailbox on Saturday, May 10.
Stoughtons First Saturdays
Enjoy downtown Stoughtons street fair atmosphere on
the first Saturday of each month from May through Sep-
tember from 10 a.m. to noon, with live music, food, artists
and sales.
Honors program
Stoughton High School will be hosting the annual Hon-
ors Program for graduating seniors on Wednesday, May
14 at 7 p.m. in the high school auditorium. The public is
invited to attend.
Use the west parking lot for entrance to the auditorium.
There is no charge for this event. For further information,
call the counseling office at 877-5618.
Third Thursday
Visit downtown Stoughton from 5-9 p.m. Thursday,
May 15, where dozens of specialty merchants and artists
in the heart of the historic downtown district have com-
mitted to staying open late the third Thursday of each
month. Visit stoughtonwi.com for information.
Pie Place 2014
Syttende Mai happens every year, so dont put your
cookbooks and pie recipes away. Practice makes perfect.
Were sure your family and friends will appreciate your
efforts.
Volunteers are always needed to bake pies, sell pies
and help clean up after the pies are eaten. Keep Pie Place
2012 in mind when youre planning your Syttende Mai
activities.
Events are set for 5:30-7:30 p.m. Friday, May 16 at
Division Street Park, and from 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Satur-
day, May 17 at the librarys lower level Carnegie Meeting
Room.
End times are estimated as it is not possible to know
when the pies will sell out. If you are interested in help-
ing, please contact Jeanne Burt at 873-4050.
Parkinsons and acupuncture
At 1:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 28, at the senior center,
Patricia A. Laufenberg from Holistic Healing Pagoda,
LLC will discuss this Eastern Medical Philosophy.
Topics that will be covered include what to expect at a
typical acupuncture appointment, clinical practice, diag-
nosis and conditions treated.
May 8, 2014 Courier Hub ConnectStoughton.com
7
Murky waters
Leaky sewer pipes could export viruses to lakes
Madison busily
lining old pipes, but
many miles remain
KATE GOLDEN
Wisconsin Center for Investigative
Journalism
A Milwaukee scientist
who found sewage migrat-
ing from old pipes through
soil and stormwater lines
into lakes or streams says
the problem is likely to
occur in the Madison area.
In any urban area, this is
going to be an issue, said
Sandra McLellan, profes-
sor and senior scientist at
the University of Wiscon-
sin-Milwaukees School of
Freshwater Sciences.
From 2008 t o 2012,
McLel l an and her col -
leagues analyzed more than
1,300 water samples from
stormwater outfalls in six
Milwaukee-area watersheds,
looking for a bacterium
called Bacterioides that indi-
cates the presence of human
sewage.
They found it. In every
watershed.
The amount of sewage
may be substantial, as well.
Early work in the most
contaminated areas of the
Menomonee River found
stormwater from nearly half
of the investigated outfalls
was composed of at least
one-quarter sewage. McLel-
lan has seen outfall samples
that resembled pure sewage.
Bacterioides were report-
ed in every outfall at some
point, suggesting sewage
contamination is nearly
ubiquitous in the urban envi-
ronment, she said. Com-
bined sewer and stormwa-
ter pipe systems have long
been known to contaminate
water bodies, but McLellan
has focused on parts of Mil-
waukee where the pipes are
separate, like in Madison.
In fact, she said inland
lakes like Madisons may be
more sensitive to this type
of contamination than Lake
Michigan, which can dilute
pollution with a lot more
water. The problem is likely
a national one. The Environ-
mental Protection Agency
cites research from Southern
California showing people
who swam in areas near
flowing storm drains were
50 percent more likely to get
sick than those who swam
farther from the drains.
The idea that the pathway
from sewer pipes to storm
drains might be a significant
source of contamination
even in areas with separate
systems is new, as is the
ability to track it. Whether
it is happening in Madison
is unknown, however, said
Trina McMahon, a Univer-
sity of Wisconsin-Madison
professor of civil engineer-
ing who studies the Yahara
lakes.
New threat?
Three years ago, when
she sat on a multi-agency
commi t t ee consi der i ng
how to improve the Yahara
lakes beaches, McMahon
was not concerned about
sewer-stormwater cross-
contamination. The work of
researchers like McLellen
changed all that.
The sanitary sewers are
so leaky, she said. Theres
so much potential for sew-
age to get into stormwater
and go into the lake.
In fact, Madison residents
have been dumping fecal
waste into the Yahara lakes
for more than a century.
Waunakee and DeForest
were the last to stop pump-
ing their waste into Lake
Mendota, in 1971. The lake
water cleared up a bit after
that, though agricultural
runoff became the main pol-
lution source at that point.
Still, each year the beach-
es are closed because of
the likely presence of fecal
waste. In Madisons Yahara
lakes, beaches were closed
more than 1,300 times from
1996 to 2013, with an aver-
age of 75 closure days (one
days closure at one beach)
each summer, according to a
Wisconsin Center for Inves-
tigative Journalism analysis.
About half of the closures
since 2008 were prompted
by high levels of a harm-
less strain of E. coli that
indicates fecal waste. Often,
rainfall washes the dirty
water into the lake, includ-
ing the feces of birds, rac-
coons that live in storm
drains, and geese at Vilas
Park.
Human sewage is far more
likely than urban stormwater
to contain pathogens that
make people and their pets
sick, according to the EPA,
and several pathways to the
beach from sewer pipes are
already known. Plumbers
occasionally connect sew-
age pipes directly to storm-
water lines, either out of
expediency or by accident,
though the city sleuths out
these illicit connections
usually one or two a year
and gets them fixed, said
Madison city engineer Greg
Fries.
Big floods also pose big
risks of contamination. In
2008, floodwaters over-
whelmed sewer systems in
more than 160 communi-
ties statewide, causing raw
sewage to flow into nearby
streams and lakes. Sewer-to-
stormwater contamination is
a different kind of problem:
smaller volume, less cata-
strophic and much harder
to diagnose.
Pipes are leaking
Making matters worse,
underground pipes across
Wisconsin and much of
the nation are crumbling.
Of Madisons 800 miles of
publicly owned sewer pipes,
the oldest date to the early
1900s and are made of clay.
Army Lt. Col. Chris
Gellasch, while a gradu-
ate student at UW-Mad-
ison a decade ago, found
human viruses in Madisons
groundwater, indicating
that the sewer pipes were
leaking. His project traced
those viruses travel down to
deep groundwater aquifers
from which drinking water
is drawn, not the stormwa-
ter connection, for the most
part.
He did, however, also find
major rainfalls correlated
with a surge of effluent lev-
els in sewer pipes, which
may suggest a connection
between the two sewer sys-
tems, he said.
As city engineer, Fries
knows well how leaky the
pipes are. Water infiltrating
them is a significant prob-
lem, prompting Madison
officials to spend $1.3 mil-
lion this year in an ongoing
project to line the old sewer
pipes with epoxy. It ren-
ders them about as good as
new and costs far less than
replacing them, he said.
The project will contin-
ue for at least another five
years, and will cover only
the city-owned lines it
does not include the laterals,
which are privately owned
sewer lines from homes to
the street that are often just
as old. Fries agreed there
was potential for a problem
but was not persuaded it
was widespread in Madison,
as sanitary sewer pipes are
typically laid 10 feet deep,
while stormwater pipes are
around 4 feet.
The exception, he said,
might be areas like the
isthmus where both the
stormwater and the sewer
lines are in shallow ground-
water. McMahon said more
research on the issue could
help determine which pipes
are most in need of replace-
ment or fixing.
It would make sense to
put some resources into try-
ing to figure out just how
big of a problem it is, she
said.

Thi s s e r i e s , Mur k y
Waters, was produced col-
laboratively by The Capital
Times and Wisconsin Cen-
ter for Investigative Jour-
nalism. It is part of Water
Watch Wisconsin, a proj-
ect supported by The Joyce
Foundation that is examin-
ing water quality and supply
issues statewide.
Photo courtesy Sandra McLellan
Sandra McLellan, professor and senior scientist at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukees School of
Freshwater Sciences, has found sewage migrating from old pipes through soil and into the stormwa-
ter lines that drain to lakes or streams. She says the problem is likely to occur in Madison and cities
nationwide.
How one developer plans to
curb runoff into Madisons lakes
BY JESSICA VANEGEREN
The Capital Times
On a recent spring day, developer Terrence Wall points
out the conservation techniques he is putting in place on
a picturesque piece of property that borders Gov. Nelson
State Park, prairie land and a small creek that drains into
Mendota Lake.
The 750-acre Community of Bishops Bay develop-
ment is a hilly plot of land and includes the fifth-highest
peak in Dane County, farmland and land that will sit dor-
mant until the property is built out over the next decade.
To reduce the chances of runoff leaving the property
before, during and after the land is developed, a GPS sur-
vey was done to determine the slopes of the land within
the borders of the property. Armed with the knowledge
of how the land drains, Wall was able to map out the nat-
urally existing drainage areas.
Now he will develop around them, not in them, as is
often the case.
There is nothing worse than a town filled with con-
crete, said Wall, 2009 recipient of the Governors
Award for Excellence in Energy Efficiency. Hes work-
ing with the nonprofit Clean Lakes Alliance to tackle
runoff before, during and after the propertys 10-year
build-out phase.
When completed, Bishops Bay will include 1,600
apartments, more than 1,300 homes, a public school, pri-
vate school, church, town center, 15-acre lake and bike
and pedestrian trails.
As developments linger, runoff can result as unde-
veloped land is often rented to farmers, resulting in less
attention given to conservation practices, said Don Heil-
man, president of the Clean Lakes Alliance.
The first step in reducing phosphorus runoff from
the Bishops Bay development was ending a lease with
a livestock farmer, which eliminates manure, a leading
cause of phosphorus pollution.
Instead, 600 of the propertys 750 acres property are
rented to Peacefully Organic Produce and a crop farmer.
We are creating a level of expectation on how to
steward the land while it is still agricultural, Heilman
said. This will be a model for other developers to fol-
low.
Beginning this summer, the propertys low-lying areas
will be modified to catch runoff from the farms in reten-
tion ponds and lakes. To match the natural elements of
the area and the developments proximity to Gov. Nelson
State Park, one neighborhood will be bordered by prairie
grass and another will include gardening plots for every
home.
The Clean Lakes Alliance has set a lofty goal to reduce
phosphorus levels by 50 percent in the five Madison-area
lakes by 2025. It comes at the same time the Madison
Metropolitan Sewerage District has begun using adap-
tive management to reduce phosphorus levels in the
Yahara Watershed in order to meet new state guidelines.
Wall, who lives on Lake Mendota and grew up swim-
ming in the lakes, said hes on board to clean up the lakes
not just because of the lingering poor water quality, but
because it makes economic sense.
We recognize this is an important watershed and we
realize the lakes are an important resource, said Wall.
Developers like me have no interest in just cranking out
another development. We take pride in our ability to be
out front on this effort.
Computer
Services
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Training
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Printer Set-up Computer Tune Up
Data Back up and Transfer
Virus & Spyware removal
Training
System Restore
Repair Services
Upgrade Services
On-site
or In-store!
Computer
Services
Computer Set-up Wireless Networking
Printer Set-up Computer Tune Up
Data Back up and Transfer
Virus & Spyware removal
Training
System Restore
Repair Services
Upgrade Services
On-site
or In-store!
UN340875
Computer Set-up
Printer Set-up
Data Backup and
Transfer
Virus & Spyware
Removal
Training
System Restore
Repair Services
Upgrade Services
Wireless Networking
Computer Tuneup
Computer
Services
Computer Set-up Wireless Networking
Printer Set-up Computer Tune Up
Data Back up and Transfer
Virus & Spyware removal
Training
System Restore
Repair Services
Upgrade Services
On-site
or In-store!
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in store!
2384 Jackson St., Stoughton
877-9548
M-F: 9-8; S: 9-5: Sun. 10-5
613 E. Main St., Evansville
882-0680
M-F: 9-7; S: 9-5; Sun. 10-5
New Drop-Off Location
1015 North Main St., Oregon
835-2980
A RadioShack Franchise
Murky Waters
This is the third installment in a four-part series, Murky
Waters, was produced collaboratively by The Capital Times
and Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism.
Next week: Hopes are tempered by hard realities, particu-
larly at Lake Kegonsa, as experts and residents join forces
to clean the Yahara lakes. Success stories can be found. But
in one sign of the challenges ahead, Daphnia, a tiny inver-
tebrate that has done much to clean up the lakes, is now
threatened by a hungry invasive species, the spiny waterflea.
8
May 8, 2014 Courier Hub ConnectStoughton.com
Norse Park concession
stand grand opening May 17
Aft er about a years
worth of planning, fund-
raising and hard work, the
new Norse Park concession
stand will be open for the
summer baseball season.
Everyone is invited to
check out the new facil-
ity Saturday, May 17. The
concession stand will be
offering BBQs, hamburg-
ers and hot dogs starting at
noon. The game between
Utica and Stoughton starts
at 2 p.m. with a short pro-
gram to follow.
The pr oj ect was t he
dream of Randy Pernot, a
former Stoughton Home
Talent League baseball
player who is battling can-
cer. Pernot and a group
of organizers made that
dream a reality with the
help of more than 150
donors this past year.
Commi t t e e me mbe r
Mary Libby told the Hub
that the project would not
have been possible without
the help of the community.
It is unbelievable the
progress we have made
in just one year, Libby
wrote, adding that this
years winter slowed prog-
ress, but didnt derail the
project. We started with
selling raffle tickets, a spa-
ghetti dinner fundraiser,
and lots of hard work on
the part of the committee,
soliciting monetary dona-
tions, labor and material
donations, and prizes for
the raffle drawing.
Organizers are hoping
for a good turnout of Home
Talent League Alumni as
well as all ball players,
fans, families and support-
ers of this project.
I t was a r ewar di ng
experience for all involved
and is a beautiful structure
for future generations to
enjoy, Libby said.
The project first start-
ed i n Febr uar y 2013.
Co mmi t t e e me mb e r s
Jim Brandt, Libby, Mark
Cuzzy Nelson, Pernot,
Dale Zeke Seffens, Erik
Veum and Ron Vosberg
first set a goal of $25,000
for the project. Pernot,
Vosberg, Veum, Steffens
and Nelson were all mem-
bers of Stoughtons cham-
pi onshi p Home Tal ent
League team in 1986.
The project really got
s t ar t ed af t er Randy s
fat her, Dave, a ret i red
Stoughton Police Depart-
ment lieutenant, donated
$10, 000 f or t he pr oj -
ect. Daves donation set
the campaign in motion.
Randy and four of hi s
friends who played on the
1986 championship team
decided the project could
become reality.
But t he gr oup soon
found their initial estimate
to be too low.
A generous donation
from the Bryant Founda-
tion helped put the cam-
paign in a more realistic
financial position, Libby
wrote. To date, the cam-
paign has raised nearly
$40,000.
The project has moved
along beautifully, Libby
said, thanks to the many
people who donated their
l abor and ot her s who
donat ed mat eri al . Dal e
Seffens, volunteer general
contractor for the project,
said if it werent for these
donors, the concession
stand cost would range in
the area of $80,000.
The five former team-
mates are so well connect-
ed to the community, Lib-
by said, adding that many
donors supplied materials
and labor at no cost. The
project is a perfect exam-
ple of a labor of love for
baseball, the community,
and for Randy.
CITY OF STOUGHTON
NOTICE OF ALDERMANIC VACANCY
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN BY
THE CITY OF STOUGHTON,
IN DANE COUNTY, WISCONSIN THAT:
Applications will be accepted from qualifed individuals living within the City of
Stoughton Aldermanic District 4 for appointment to a vacant seat on the Common
Council. The appointment term will cover a period from the date of appointment until
the Spring Election in April 2015. The seat will be up for election in April 2015 to fll
the remainder of the term which ends in April 2016.
If interested in being appointed, please submit your resum and an aldermanic
appointment questionnaire to the City Clerks Offce. The questionnaire is available
on the Citys website or by request in the Offce of the City Clerk, 381 E. Main Street.
Candidates will be interviewed at the regular meeting of the Common Council on
May 27, 2014. It is anticipated that the appointed candidate will be seated and sworn
into offce at the selected meeting.
If you have questions, please contact the City Clerks Offce at (608) 873-6677
U
N
3
4
6
1
6
3
DeanCare Gold (Cost) is a product of Dean Health Plan, Inc. and is available to Medicare
beneciaries residing in Columbia, Dane, Dodge, Grant, Iowa, Jefferson, Rock or Sauk
Counties. The benet information provided is a brief summary, not a complete description
of benets. For more information contact the plan. You must continue to pay your
Medicare Part B premium. Benets, provider network, premium and/or copayments may
change on January 1 of each year. Limitations, copayments and restrictions may apply.
Medicare evaluates plans based on a Five-Star rating system. Star ratings are calculated
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TTY dial 711 or call (877) 733-6456. Hours of Operation: October 1, 2013, through February
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through February 14, 2015, Monday through Sunday 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m.
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5
W
E

R
E

8
2
YEARS
Y
O
U
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BEST
D
ELI
LUN
C
H
IN TOWN
Plus 5 Other Great Locations
STOUGHTON
873-3334 McCOMB RD
Come on in,
pick up her faves, then grill em up!
visit www.jacobsonbrosdeli.com
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Tim Andrews Horticulturist - LLC
608-223-9970
www.tahort.com
Caring for our Green World since 1978
It's all about the details!
Fall Cleanups, Tree and Shrub Pruning, Planting and
Removals, Stump Grinding, Mulching and Complete
Landscape Makeovers.
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Spring Pruning, Cleanup,
Lawn Repair and Complete
Landscape Makeovers
RD benefit
is Saturday
Enjoy the spring weather
and get out and ride motor-
cycles for a good cause this
weekend.
The RD benefit for mul-
tiple sclerosis is set for Sat-
urday, May 10, at 714 Taylor
Lane. Registration goes from
11 a.m. until noon, with a
ride to follow until 4 p.m.
Char Nelson will provide
entertainment from 5-6 p.m.,
with Back Country Roads
from 7-10 p.m. Food and
beverages are available after
4 p.m.
There is a $20 registration
fee.
If you go
What: RD benefit ride for
multiple sclerosis
When: 11 a.m. to 10
p.m. Saturday, May 10
Where: 714 Taylor Lane
If you go
What: Norse Park
concession stand grand
opening
When: Noon, Saturday,
May 17
Where: Norse Park, 630
Kriedeman Drive
Info: Stoughton
Merchants Home Talent
page on Facebook
File photo
Former Stoughton Home Talent player Randy Pernot was the
visionary behind plans to construct a new concession building with
indoor plumbing for bathrooms and a press box at Norse Park.
May 8, 2014 - The Courier Hub - 9
Hours: 7:00am-6:00pm Monday-Friday; Closed Saturday
1324 Hwy. 51-138 Stoughton
www.conantauto.com U
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We take care of your family by taking care of your familys car
Stoughtons Premier Goodyear Dealer!
This Past Winter Has Been
Tough On your Vehicle!
Time for a check-up!
Home of the
2 year, 24,000
mile warranty
206 W Prospect Ave
873-9244
www.cressfuneralservice.com
FAMILY OWNED &
OPERATED SINCE 1869
Mom
Deserves
the Best
Let Main Street Flowers & Gifts
arrange a smile for your Mom on
Mothers Day.
Sunday, May 11th
161 W. MAIN STREET STOUGHTON
www.mainstreetfowersandgifts.com
PHONE ORDERS 873-2833
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Visit McGlynn Pharmacy for all of
your health care needs.
PRIDE Lift Chairs Wheelchairs
Walkers Shower/Bath Aids
Commodes Toilet Aids
Cassette Filling Service Bubble Packing
Call us at (608) 873-3244 with
questions or stop in. Were happy to help!
www.mcglynnrx.com
100 E. Main Street
Downtown Stoughton
873-3244
Hours: Mon-Fri 8 am-6 pm; Sat 8 am-5 pm; Sun 8 am-12 noon
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Theres no better time than now to get into
the best shape of your life.
Affordable One-on-One Training
We provide a unique program for men and women designed specifically for the
de-conditioned or first-time exerciser in a safe and comfortable environment
with ISSA Certified trainers.
Receive Results Like These:
Live Healthier Increase Self-Esteem
Lose Body Fat Gain Muscle
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Have More Energy Relieve Stress
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Introductory Offer
4 personal training sessions for only
$
99
Call for a Free Consultation
Check us out at www.pecspersonalfitness.com
(
608
)
347-1036
101 Silverado Drive, Stoughton, WI
Your Call to a Healthier Life
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STOUGHTON FLORAL
168 E. Main Street Stoughton
Flower Phone: 873-6173 or 866-595-6800
Monday-Friday 8 am-5 pm; Saturday 8 am-3 pm
http://www.stoughtonfloral.com
Reward Mom
With Beautiful Blooms!
2364 Jackson Street
Stoughton, WI 53589
Mon-Fri 7:30-6:30; Sat 9-4
(608) 877-2679 PHONE
(608) 877-8318 FAX
store3617@theupsstore.com
www.theupsstore.com
Moving Box Sale!
Buy 3,
Get 1 Free!
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Offer expires 8/16/14
Locally owned
in Stoughton
If you would like
to see your ad in
this spot, contact
Catherine Stang
at
873-6671
or
stoughtonsales@wcinet.com
10 - The Stoughton Courier Hub - Pets - May 8, 2014
Treat Your Dog
Like A Champion!
Best in Show L.L.C.
Daily Dog Walking &
In-Home Pet Sitting
608-239-4609
www.BestInShowLLC.com
Dog, Cat & Small Animal Boarding
Professional Full Service Grooming

$
5 Off Grooming or 10% Off
Boarding with this ad (Expires 7/15/14)
835-1780
(10 min. from the beltline)
2065 Sand Hill Rd., Oregon, WI
www.forestridgekennel.com
forestridge1@aol.com
HOURS: M, T, Th, F: 9am-5:30pm,
W & Sat: 9am-Noon, Sun: 4pm-5pm
Not Just a Pharmacy
Shop our excellent selection of gifts
while we fll your prescription
Crabtree & Evelyn Products
Freshwave Products
Crossroads Candles
Greenleaf Fragrances
Willow Tree and More
(HSA cards accepted)
202 S. Main Street, Verona 848-8020
Check out www.myhometownrx.com
Hours
M-F 9am-6pm
Sat 9am-1pm
Closed
Sunday
Were there when
you cant be.
Pet Care
Comfortable, Safe, at Home
Serving Stoughton & Oregon
Dog Walking
Pet Sitting
Pet Taxi
Michael Boyle, DVM
Denise Fortier, DVM
Village Animal Clinic
Compassionate & Gentle Care For Pets
835-7007
270 West Netherwood
Oregon
424-1330
619 River Street
Belleville
More than $84K
raised at Puppy Walk
Chalet Veterinary Clinic of Stoughton
hosted a team of 22 staff members, doc-
tors, clients and their canine companions to
participate in the first Puppy Up! Walk.
Puppies were a plenty at McKee Farms
Park Fitchburg Sunday at the walk.
The walk was organized by members
of the Dane County Veterinary Medical
Association to raise funds for comparative
cancer research. Walks like this are being
held across the country by the parent orga-
nization 2 Million Dogs Foundation, an
organization founded by Luke Robinson
who walked over 2,000 miles with his two
dogs to raise awareness for cancer research
and treatment.
More than 700 people walked on Sun-
day with around 200-300 dogs. Total funds
raised were estimated to be $84,000.
The goal of these walks is both to raise
money and awareness of the importance
of comparative oncology. Cancer has
touched the lives of many people and their
pets. Since cancers in cats, dogs, and peo-
ple often are similar, advances made in
cancer treatment in one species are used to
enhance the treatment of cancer in another.
Both human and canine cancer survivors
participated in Sundays walk.
2 Million Dogs Foundation has donated
funds for the study of breast cancer, bone
cancer and bladder cancer to collaborative
studies at institutions like Harvard, Univer-
sity of Pennsylvania, MIT, Animal Medi-
cal Center of New York, and Sloan Ketter-
ing.
Photos submitted
Sundays Puppy Up! Walk brought animal lovers out to raise more than $84K for comparative cancer
research. Above are participants from Chalet Veterinary Clinic of Stoughton.
A group
from Chalet
Veterinary
Clinic of
Stoughton
hosted a team
of 22 staff
members at
the Puppy Up!
Walk in May.
May 8, 2014 - Pets - The Stoughton Courier Hub - 11
Your Local Grocer
for Everyone in the Family!
We carry Evangers, Daves,
Premium Edge & Professional pet foods
for particular pet parents.
787 N. Main Street Oregon, WI
(608) 835-3939
www.billsfoodcenter.com
787 N. Main Street Oregon, WI
Limit one coupon per person per transaction.
Offer expires 7/1/14
$
2
00
OFF
any dry pet food
3 lbs. or more
(608) 835-0551
Oregon, WI
www.countryviewvets.com
Where your
loved one
receives our
hometown
care.
309 Schweitzer Drive . Verona
(608) 845-6154
www.fourwindsmanor.com
There are many aspects to caring for others.
At Four Winds we recognize that health care is multifaceted.
Sometimes the best therapists have four legs.
Four Winds isnt just about care. Its about living.
Better Care. Better Living.
H U G H E S F L O O R I N G
C O M M E R C I A L / R E S I D E N T I A L
Family Owned and Operated Since 1978
407 E. Verona Avenue, Verona, WI 608.845.6403
Has Fido Been A Little RUFF
On Your Flooring?
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Miss Bella
Owner name: Kel l i
McKinley
Pet name: Miss Bella
Pets age: 13 months
What kind of pet do you
have? puppy dog Shih Tzu
How long have you had
it? 12 months
What makes your pet
special? Cutest little prin-
cess ever and she loves Bud-
dy
About my pet: In the
Bella Bells photo, she was
scared to come down the
big, bad stairs so we had
to go get her and carry her
down.
Buddy
Owner name: Larry Eifert
Pet name: Buddy
Pets age: 12 years
Breed: puppy dog Border
Collie
How long have you had
Bella
Buddy
Zoey
Pet profiles:
Owners sound off on their cute pets you might see around town!
Turn to Page 12
12 - The Stoughton Courier Hub - Pets - May 8, 2014
your pet? 12 years
What makes your pet
special? Smartest dog in the
whole wide world .... has his
own non-profit organiza-
tion called Buddy of Mine
.... starred in the local musi-
cal production of Oliver
.... had his picture with the
mayor and he loves every-
body!
About my pet: Buddy
loves baseball .... he watch-
es every pitch and will run
the fence line when some-
one gets a hit, then goes
right back to staring at the
pi t cher unt i l he t hrows
the ball. Barely takes time
to get a drink during a 9
inning game.
Zoey
Owner name: Hel en
Yopp
Pet name: Zoey
Pets age: 6 years
What kind of pet do you
have? Shih-tzu dog
How long have you had
it? 5 years
What makes your pet
special? Zoey is a dog I res-
cued from an on-line rescue
group in Iowa. Before she
came to me, she had spent
most of her life locked in
a kennel, and yes, she has
issues but she has so much
love to give.
About my pet: Her pics
are of her just enjoying a
day of boating up north on
Lake Chetak.
Zeke
Owner name: Elizabeth
Tessier
Pet name: Zeke
Pets age: 16
Breed: Birman cat
How long have you your
pet? 16
What makes your pet
special? Zeke is with me
whenever he can and that
includes at night when he
sleeps on my pillow with
me or is next to me.
Zeke is my soul mate and
I am his soul mate. If Im
gone longer than five hours
he starts meowing and com-
plaining, sometimes even
walking into my familys
room at night and meowing
in their ears, and let me tell
you that is not the best way
to wake up.
Zeke thinks exactly how
I think, for instance, he
wakes me up in the morn-
ing on time if Im late for
school, meows at me when
its time for bed or even
when Im feeling down and
need to be comforted!
Somet i mes when my
family and I are going on
a few days trip, I get teary
eyed when were leaving. I
dont know what I will do
without him when he goes
but he will always have a
big section in my heart to
remember him by. Zeke
was wi t h me from day
one of my life and he will
always be with me.
A b o u t m y p e t :
MEOW!!!
Zeke?!? Why did you
wake me up?!? Its still 3
a.m.!
Sometimes Zeke wakes
me up in the morning at the
right time and sometimes
not. It can be really annoy-
ing, but I still love him!
I nicknamed Zeke in the
morning my alarm clock.
In the morning I dont get,
Beep! Beep! Beep! I get,
Meow! Meow! Meow!
Its really strange but I
think its unique! Zeke is
the oddest cat Ive met but
the best cat I know.
Lucky
Owner name: Davi d
Tessier
Pet name: Lucky
Pets age: 5
B r e e d : Mi n i a t u r e
Schnauzer
How long have you had
your pet? 4 years
What makes your pet
special? His journey on
how he got to our fam-
ily. He was found, wander-
ing the streets of Chicago,
abused from a previous
owner. The shelter that res-
cued him didnt have any
room for him so they were
going to euthanize him. Just
before they did, another
shelter took him in. Thats
when we came i n and
adopted him. He was scared
and scrawny, but with a big
spirit nonetheless. We knew
he was perfect and we were
right because he is the best
dog ever.
About my pet: We all
love playing games with
Lucky.
He is energetic, and very
competitive. My favorite
thing to do with him is to
play hide and seek. When
Lucky i s i n a di fferent
room, I will hide behind a
door or a curtain and call
his name.
Its hard not to laugh
when he comes charging
in, barking crazy look-
ing for me. Its funny how
distressed he gets when
he cant find me, although
the barking becomes more
consistent and loud. I will
keep calling his name until
he finds me and I jump out
and wrestle with him. He
is such a feisty dog and a
great hide and seek player.
purrrrrsonal matchmaking for every family!
Pet Adoption Microchipping Retail Store
Educational Resources Volunteer Opportunities
WWW.ANGELSWISH.ORG
825 East Johnson Street
Madison
608-515-8255
www.doghausuniversity.com
Every dog has the
right to a good time
Pet Proof Your Floor!
Get Smart Strand

Carpet Today!
Time-tested durability
Remove tough stains like mustard
and wine with just hot water
Lifetime stain warranty
Made with renewable resources
Call us today! Free Estimates!
Gerlach
Wholesale
Flooring, Inc.
112 Janesville St.,
Oregon, WI
(608) 835-8276
Mon., Fri. & Sat. Appointment Only,
Tues. & Thurs. 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Wed. 12 p.m.-6 p.m.
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Dr. Elizabeth Stokes Dr. Emilie Schwarz Dr. Brooke Lewis Dr. Kaitlin Young Dr. Mary Kueer
STATE-OF-THE-ART VETERINARY CARE
Laser Surgery
Digital X-Ray & Dental X-Ray
Dental Treatment Center
Puppy/Kitten through Senior Care
Intensive Care Units
Separate Cat & Dog Facilities
Abdominal Ultrasound
Complete In-House Lab & Pharmacy
E-Pet Records & Pet Portals
Rehabilitation Laser Therapy
Best Care for Best Friends
288-7838
odysseyvetcare.com
2934 Chapel Valley Rd.
Fitchburg (just off Hwy PD)
Pets are
welcom
e on
the Patio!
3097 Sunnyside St., Stoughton
608-205-9300
Zeke
Lucky
Turn to Page 13
May 8, 2014 - Pets - The Stoughton Courier Hub - 13
Cooper
Owner name: Danielle Swen-
son
Pet name: Cooper
Pets age: 1.5 years
Breed: Lab Terrier Mix puppy
How long have you had your
pet? A year at the end of May
What makes your pet special?
Cooper was rescued by a special
organization called Puppy Love
Rescue and that is how we found
him. Even though he didnt have
the easiest start to his life, he has
the biggest heart. He is literally
the sweetest dog Ive ever met. (I
might be biased.)
He loves to give kisses and
overall be in the company of peo-
ple. At the end of the day Coo-
per likes to cuddle and snuggle
up right next to you when he is
sleepy.
About my pet: Cooper is so
friendly and thinks that everyone
and every other dog is his best
friend. When we are out walk-
ing and Cooper sees another dog
around us he will simply lay down
until it approaches or passes us. I
assume he does this because he
is waiting for them to come play
with him. This is funny and cute
99 percent of the time. But some-
times Cooper decides to lay down
in middle of the road while wait-
ing for other dogs to walk by us
and it is sort of inconvenient.
I physically have to pick him up
and move him because he refus-
es to move. So if traffic is ever
stopped from a little black dog
just taking a break from his walk,
thats Cooper. He is a silly dog!
Rocky Mandt
Owner name: Mandt Sandfill
Pet name: Rocky Mandt
Pets age: 7
Breed: Cat
How long have you had your
pet? 3 years
What makes your pet special?
Rocky is our office cat at Mandt
Sandfill. He loves people he
greets every customer who walks
in our office.
If its not a lick of your hand, its
a please pet me. He has grown on
all our employees. Every morning
Rocky is here to start the day with
all of us. We all love him.
About my pet: He is always
willing to be dressed up for differ-
ent occasions along with pictures
that we share on his facebook fan
page. He has a awesome personal-
ity and is an all around cool cat.
We all love having him around.
Grant
Owner name: Darlene Groenier
Pet name: Grant
Pets age: Six to eight years old
Breed: I have a Golden Retriev-
er, ninety pound, red, curly, and
furry dog. A neighbor calls him
Big Red.
How long have you had your
pet? About 4 years
What makes your pet spe-
cial? I rescue him from
BARK (Boscobel Area
Rescue Kennel. He
had lots of wood ticks
and Lymes disease.
I nursed him back to
great health.
About my pet: He
is great walker and we
walk twice daily even
when it snowing, rain-
ing, sleet, icy and he
loves the cold.
We have a fenced
in back yard but likes to lay in the
garage in front. The only time he
goes out of the yard is to see the
next door neighbor kids, so they
can pet him and then right back
in the garage. I hope he lives to a
hundred and I think he is just the
greatest dog.
When he meets people when
we walk, he wants everyone to pet
him. He likes little dogs that do
not bark.
Toby
Owner name: Carol Crotty
Pet name: Toby Crotty
Pets age: 10 years old
Breed: Bichon Frise
How long have you had your
pet? 10 years
What makes your pet special?
Toby is very smart, my roommate,
loves to go for walks and visits my
Mom and tenants at her assisted
living place.
About my pet: When it was
really cold out this winter I put
a coat and boots on Toby, and
when he gets outside it is funny
to watch him run around like a
crazy because his feet are nice and
warm.
I taught Toby to jump over
water puddles so he doesnt get
dirty. He has outfits for lots of dif-
ferent kinds of temperatures and
holidays.
You can too! Looking for a pet?
Want to make a donation?
Call them today!!
Kathy Bartels
Me & My
Furry Friends
Miss Lillie & George
support the Humane Society!
(608) 235-2927
kbverona@charter.net
210 South Main Street, Verona
608-845-6478
Monday-Saturday 6:30 am-9 pm
Sunday 6:30 am-7 pm
We Have
EVERYTHING
for Your Other Kids Too!
Rocky Mandt
Grant
Toby
Cooper
14 - The Stoughton Courier Hub - Pets - May 8, 2014
Horsemanship marked by care for animal
To horseback riders who
compete in the sport of
eventing, the conclusion of
the Rolex Kentucky Three
Day Event is the sign that
the summer show season
has arrived. Rolex is the
only four star (the highest
level) three-day event in
America.
T h e
s por t of
event i ng
combines
three dis-
c i p l i n e s
and was
u s e d a s
a w a y
t o t e s t
Ca v a l r y
Officers
horses for their fitness and
suitability. These days, it
is one of the most popular
sports amongst equestrians.
To see an example of event-
ing, the USEF Network
has online video from the
recent Rolex competition.
Competitors of all ages
and levels will invest count-
less hours with their hors-
es to prepare for the next
show, which will help them
to reach their competitive
goals.
While these goals are
important to keep us on
track and confirm our train-
ing, riders should not lose
sight of the most impor-
tant aspect of horseman-
ship, which is to protect the
soundness of the mind and
body of the horse.
Here are some tips Ive
learned through my experi-
ence as a horse trainer on
how to have not only a suc-
cessful show season, but
increase the happiness and
longevity of any horse.
Building trust
This should be the great-
est priority at all times
when t r ai ni ng a hor se
because foundation in the
training the mind of a horse
is trust. Honor this trust by
not pushing a horse beyond
his capabilities.
In the sport of eventing,
the rider asks the horse to
maneuver over and around
obstacles in a natural set-
ting at a high rate of speed.
At many of these obsta-
cles, the horse cannot see
what is on the other side,
and takes cues from the
rider on how to approach
the jump. While schooling
and conditioning, the rider
should confirm that their
horse fully understands
the basics and cues before
moving on to the next level.
Presenting him with chal-
lenges that he is not pre-
pared for could scare him
and chip away at the trust-
ing foundation.
Let horses be horses
Al ong wi t h c a r e f ul
schooling, it is important
that the horse is allowed
to be a horse. The more
hours a day a horse can
spend outdoors, the better.
It is natural for them, and
their bodies require them to
be able to graze and move
about the pasture. They
will stay more fit if they
are allowed to move, rather
than spending half of their
existence standing in a stall.
Protection
T o p r o t e c t t h e
horses body, judicious
conditioning to gradually
increase the horses athleti-
cism should be practiced-
just as in the human athlete.
At a young age, I learned
the most valuable lesson
of horsemanship from my
father. After a ride in which
my friend and I had obvi-
ously pushed our horses too
hard, he saw how tired they
were and said, this is not
a machine. That statement
stuck with me and I think
that many riders forget that
when they are envisioning
leading the victory lap and
a blue ribbon on the wall.
It is the duty of the rider to
know their horse inside and
out so they can detect when
the horse has become men-
tally or physically tired.
Consciousness
Pushing a horse to work
t hrough a soreness i s
betraying his trust and has
the potential to harm not
only the body, but the mind
of a sport horse. The long
term goal of the rider is to
have a sound horse through
the entirety of its life; not
just its show career. When
a horse is retired from
competition, that does not
mean that progression and
training must end.
A horse is always learn-
ing and developing and the
greatest reward is to have
an act i ve, happy horse
through his final days.

Cynthia Lowenberg has
been riding horses since
age 3 and has been a
horseback riding trainer
based in the Madison
area for 15 years. She has
successfully competed at
the International level on
self trained horses and is
currently working toward
a degree in Life Sciences
Communication.
Chalet Veterinary Clinic
Family Pet Care at its Best
1621 E. Main St., Stoughton
(608) 873-8112
Mon. - Fri. 7:00 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.
Sat. 7:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Cherokee Kennels
Pet Boarding
Daycare
608-835-5250
M-F 7:30 am - 5:30 pm
Sat 7:30 am - 11:00 am
Sun 7:30 am - 8:00 am and 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
www.cherokeekennels.com
4891 Byrne Rd Fitchburg, WI 53575
Your Hometown
Hardware Store
Yes, we have pet supplies!
119 W. Verona Avenue
845-7920
Family Owned for 43 Years
Turn your To-Do list into a To-Done list!
Adopt A Pet From
Angels Wish
Additional information about these animals available for
adoption can be found online at: www.angelswish.org
161 Horizon Drive, Verona, WI 53593 (608) 848-4174
These pets are sponsored by the following businesses:
Miller & Sons Supermarket
210 S. Main St., Verona
845-6478
Biscotti
Domestic Short Hair
orange tabby
Female Senior
Conant Automotive
1324 Hwy. 51-138, Stoughton
873-8800
Allan
Domestic Short Hair
grey and white
Male Shy
Conant Automotive
1324 Hwy. 51-138, Stoughton
873-8800
Stan
Domestic Short Hair Tuxedo
Male, Special Needs Kitten
Bills Food Center
787 N. Main St., Oregon
835-3939
Colt
Domestic Short Hair
Male, Grey and White
Village Animal Clinic of Oregon
270 W Netherwood Rd., Oregon
835-7007
Lola Ginger
Domestic Short Hair Tabby
Female
Radio Shack of Stoughton
2384 Jackson St., Stoughton
877-9548
Duffy
Domestic Short Hair
Male, White
Verona Hometown Pharmacy
202 S. Main St., Verona
848-8020
Lola
Domestic Short Hair
brown tabby
Female
The Sows Ear
125 S. Main St., Verona
848-2755 www.knitandsip.com
Boone
Domestic Short Hair
white tabby
Male Senior
Cynthia
Lowenberg
Photo submitted
Cynthia Lowenberg is a Madison-area horse trainer who raises horses in the Madison area. She has
been riding horses since age 3 and training horses professionally for about 15 years. Above are a few
of her horses in the pasture.
15 - Unified Newspaper Group - Pets - May 8, 2014
Adopt A Pet From
Dane County
Humane Society
View all of our animals and detailed descriptions at Giveshelter.org
DCHS Main Shelter 5132 Voges Rd., Madison, WI 53718 838-0413
These pets are sponsored by the following businesses:
Shaw Building & Design
3185 Deer Point Dr., Stoughton
shawbuilders.com 800-699-7449
ANGEL - 22571410
Female, Guinea Pig
Located: DCHS
Springers
3097 Sunnyside St., Stoughton
205-9300
BO RYAN - 22370419
Male, Hound mix
Located: DCHS
The Sows Ear
125 S. Main St., Verona
848-2755 www.knitandsip.com
ARIN - 22044956
Female, Grey Domestic Longhair
Located: DCHS
Odyssey Veterinary Care
2934 Chapel Valley Rd., Fitchburg
288-7838 odysseyvetcare.com
KAIDEN - 22550563
Male, Dutch Rabbit
Located: DCHS
Bills Food Center
787 N. Main St., Oregon
835-3939
T JACKS - 22370433
Female, Siberian Husky/
Shar Pei mix
Located: DCHS
Country View Veterinary Service
1350 S. Fish Hatchery Rd., Oregon
835-0551
SARA LEE - 20100255
Female, Quarterhorse Mare
Located: DCHS
Chalet Veterinary Clinic
1621 E. Main St., Stoughton
873-8112
FOXGLOVE - 22484658
Female, Black Domestic Longhair
Located: DCHS Adoption
Center West
Unwin Chiropractic
212 E. Verona Ave., Suite B, Verona
848-1800
ADEN - 22370406
Male, Pit Bull/Catahoula
Leopard mix
Located: DCHS
Village Animal Clinic of Oregon
270 W Netherwood Rd., Oregon
835-7007
MR. CHATTERBOX - 22483881
Male, Gray Domestic Shorthair
Located: DCHS Adoption
Center West
Comfort Keepers
5396 King James Way, Ste 210, Fitchburg
442-1898 www.comfortkeepers.com
FRANK - 22232931
Male, Hound mix
Located: DCHS
Verona Ace
119 W. Verona Ace, Verona
845-7920
SWEETY - 22448154
Female, Torti Domestic Shorthair
Located: DCHS
Hughes Flooring
407 E. Verona Ave., Verona
845-6403
CLARK - 22565549
Male, Domestic Shorthair
Located: DCHS Adoption
Center West
Conant Automotive
1324 Hwy. 51-138, Stoughton
873-8800
ASHTON - 22361281
Male, Hamster
Located: DCHS Mounts East
Kathy Bartels
Coldwell Banker Success
235-2927 kbartels@cbsuccess.com
PIPER - 21355556
Female, Brown Tabby Shorthair
Located: DCHS - Adoption
Center West
Animal Hospital of Verona
203 W. Verona Ave., Verona
845-6700 www.vetcor.com/verona
SALEM - 22491648
Male, Black Domestic Shorthair
Located: DCHS
Rockweiler Insulation
211 Legion Street, Verona
845-7625
BEEGHARA - 22097813
Male, Black Domestic Shorthair
Located: DCHS - Adoption
Center West
Village Animal Clinic of Oregon
270 W Netherwood Rd., Oregon
835-7007
IGGY - 20351028
Male, Mini Rex Rabbit
Located: DCHS
Mounds Fitchburg
Village Animal Clinic of Oregon
270 W Netherwood Rd., Oregon
835-7007
BAGEL - 22385611
Male, Beagle
Located: DCHS
Tabby & Jacks
2970 Cahill Main, Fitchburg
277-5900
INDY - 22291496
Male, Jack Russell Terrier mix
Located: DCHS
Shaw Building & Design
3185 Deer Point Dr., Stoughton
shawbuilders.com 800-699-7449
TY - 20734275
Male, Quarterhorse Gelding
Located: DCHS
Verona Hometown Pharmacy
202 S. Main St., Verona
848-8020
BORRIS - 22390819
Male, Airedale mix
Located: DCHS
Conant Automotive
1324 Hwy. 51-138, Stoughton
873-8800
STACY JUNE - 22278220
Female, Black/White Dwarf
English Spot Rabbit
Located: DCHS
The Sows Ear
125 S. Main St., Verona
848-2755 www.knitandsip.com
BABYFACE - 11474141
Female, Domestic Medium Hair
Located: DCHS
Forest Ridge Kennel
2065 Sandhill Rd., Oregon
835-1780
JACKY - 22458394
Female, Jack Russell Terrier mix
Located: DCHS
Village Animal Clinic of Oregon
270 W Netherwood Rd., Oregon
835-7007
SUNNY - 22544933
Male, Beige Domestic Shorthair
Located: DCHS
The Sows Ear
125 S. Main St., Verona
848-2755 www.knitandsip.com
ANDY - 22291516
Male, Jack Russell Terrier mix
Located: DCHS
Kathy Bartels
Coldwell Banker Success
235-2927 kbartels@cbsuccess.com
MICKEY - 22354982
Female, Rat Terrier Mix
Located: DCHS
In Loving Memory of Sammy
The Larson Family
Oregon, WI
LANA - 22054852
Female, Lab/Shepherd mix
Located: DCHS
Miller & Sons Supermarket
210 S. Main St., Verona
845-6478
WILBUR - 22160533
Male, Pot Bellied Pig
Located: DCHS
POMPEII - 22510286
Male, Bown/White Domestic
Shorthair
Located: DCHS
Gerlach Wholesale Flooring, Inc.
112 Janesville St., Oregon
835-8276
SPORTS
Jeremy Jones, sports editor
845-9559 x226 ungsportseditor@wcinet.com

Thursday, May 8, 2014
Anthony Iozzo, assistant sports editor
845-9559 x237 sportsreporter@wcinet.com
Fax: 845-9550
For more sports coverage, visit:
ConnectStoughton.com
Courier Hub
16
Bach scores three goals
in win over Lake Mills
ANTHONY IOZZO
Assistant sports editor
Senior Hayley Bach and the
Stoughton High School girls soc-
cer team dominated the posses-
sion in the first half last Friday
against Lake Mills in a 3-1 win.
Bach not onl y scored t hree
goals in the first 40 minutes, but
the rest of the Vikings pound-
ed out shots on goal and nearly
scored four more times.
I had no idea that (a hat trick)
would come tonight, but I came
in and I wanted to win, Bach
said. Everyone else did too,
and we came out with intensity
today.
The intensity died down a little
in the second half, as Lake Mills
Lizzy Burrow scored a goal to
cut Stoughtons lead to two goals
with over 25 minutes to play. But
the defense tightened up in the
end to hold off The L-Cats.
We owned the ball in the first
half, and we tried to go too for-
ward too fast in the second half
and ended up losing it and bring-
ing it back against us, head
coach Dave Wermuth said.
But, he added, a win is a win.
Bach scored the first goal in the
16th minute from a pass by Mag-
gie Wirag and knocked in the sec-
ond goal unassisted in the 24th
minute. Bach added her third goal
near the end of the first half with
an assist to Maddie Posick.
It feels awesome to pull off
the win, especially with how well
my t eammat es pl ayed, Bach
said. I wouldnt have been able
to score without them.
Hannah Wood finished with
two saves for Stoughton, while
Megan Tickner picked up 11 for
Lake Mills.
Wer mut h sai d t hat f or t he
Vikings (4-6 overall, 0-3 Badger
South), he looks at the team start-
ing to come together and spread
the field more.
I think they are jelling, he
said. They are surprising me
with being more thoughtful with
the ball.
Stoughton continues the sea-
son at 7 p.m. Tuesday, May 13, at
Beloit Memorial.
Monona Grove 6, Stoughton 0
The Vi ki ngs t r a ve l e d t o
Monona Grove last Thursday and
fell 6-0.
Savannah Cruz scored four
goals for the Silver Eagles.
Wood picked up one save.
Edgewood 1, Stoughton 0
St ought on host ed Madi son
Edgewood Tuesday and lost a
1-0 heartbreaker on a windy night
that limited both offenses.
The girls played well against
(Edgewood), Wermuth said. It
is sad to give a goal and lose, but
it is heartening to know that the
girls played up with a team in our
conference that has done very
well.
Senior Lauren Netzal scored
the winning goal in the 52nd min-
ute for the Crusaders.
Wood finished with two saves.
Stoughton had three shots on goal
for the game.
Vikes edge
Cheesemakers
ANTHONY IOZZO
Assistant sports editor
The Stoughton High School
boys golf team edged Mon-
roe 174-176 last Monday in
a Badger South Conference
dual at Monroe Country Club.
Freshman Sam Anderson
shot a 38, while senior Max
Fergus shot a 42. Sophomore
Gunnar Goetz added a 45,
while sophomore Austin Kot-
lowski finished the scoring
with a 49.
Eric Timm led Monroe
with a 41, while Matt Miller
added a 42. Nick Baumann
was third on the team with a
44, and Kyle Krebs finished
the Cheesemakers scoring
with a 49.
Stoughton finishes up the
regular season with an invi-
tational at Whistling Straits
Irish Course in Sheboygan at
9 a.m. Saturday and a match
at 3:30 p.m. Tuesday, May
13, against Madison Edge-
wood at Stoughton Country
Club.
The Badger Cup is Tues-
day, May 20, while the Bad-
ger South Conference meet
is at 9 a.m. Wednesday, May
21, at the House on the Rock
Resort.
Stoughton 177,
Oregon 177
The Vikings traveled to
Foxboro Golf Course last
Thursday and tied Oregon at
177.
Fergus shot a 41, while
Anderson followed with a 44.
Gunnar Goetz was next with a
45, and sophomore Ian Sutton
finished the scoring with a 47.
Oregon junior Carson
Torhorst led with a 42, while
sophomore Brandon Michek
shot a 44. Sophomores Bran-
don Rogers (45) and Jimmy
Lutz (46) finished the scoring
for the Panthers.
Portage invite
Stoughton traveled to Por-
tage Country Club for the
Warrior Invitational and fin-
ished seventh with a 340.
Anderson finished third
overall with a 76, while Fer-
gus followed with an 84.
Goetz shot an 87, and Kot-
lowski finished the scoring
with a 93.
Mequon Homestead (313),
Brookfield Central (322) and
Beaver Dame (330) finished
first through third, respec-
tively.
Fort Atkinson 164,
Stoughton 172
Stoughton traveled to
Koshkonong Mounds Coun-
try Club to take on Fort Atkin-
son Tuesday and lost 164-
172.
The Vikings are now 3-1-1
in Badger South duals.
Fergus shot a 39, while
Anderson followed up with
a 40. Goetz (46) and Sutton
(47) finished the scoring.
Fort was led by Nate Gil-
bert with a 38. Bentley Glass
followed with a 39, while
Nate Ciske shot a 41.
Mitch Strom was the fourth
score with a 46.
More records fall in another first-place outing
ANTHONY IOZZO
Assistant sports editor
Records have been no match for
the Stoughton High School girls
track and field team this season,
and last Thursdays team win in
the Panther Relays at Oregon High
School was no exception.
The Vikings took first over-
all with 88 points, led by a meet/
school record in the sprint medley
relay, a school record in the triple
jump relay and a meet record in
the 4x800 relay.
Stoughton senior Maren Schultz,
junior Megan Reese and freshman
Mya Lonnebotn set the school
record in the triple jump with a
first-place distance of 86 feet, 6
1/4 inches, while senior Hannah
Sonsalla, junior Nikki Staffen,
sophomore Maren Gryttenholm
and freshman Aly Weum set a
meet and school record in the
sprint medley with a first-place
time of 4 minutes, 20.35 seconds.
Senior Katherine Rude, junior
Kelsey Jenny, Staffen and Weum
also set a meet record with a first
place in the 4x800 in 9:57.03.
The Vikings also got first places
in the 3x100 hurdle shuttle, the
3x300 hurdle shuttle, the 4x100
relay, the long jump, high jump
and shot put.
Junior Alexa Deutsch, sopho-
more Shelby Orcutt and fresh-
man Kylie Lynch won the 3x100
hurdles in 54.37, while Sonsalla,
Deutsch and Orcutt won the 3x300
hurdles in 2:38.15. The 4x100
relay of Senior Mykala Conroy,
freshman Kendra Hal verson,
Reese and Posick won in 53.80.
Hal ver son, Lonnebot n and
Reese won the long jump (44-
9 1/4), while Schultz, Kahl and
Posick took the high jump (14-0).
Juniors Allie Niemeyer, Savanna
Smith and Alexus Crocket won the
shot put (94-6 1/4).
Posick, Conroy and Lynch tied
for second in the pole vault (18-
0), and Junior Ila Giese, Smith and
Niemeyer took third in the discus
(258-9)
The 4x200 rel ay of Rachel
Hedman, freshman Payton Kahl,
Schultz and Lonnebotn also took
third in 1:55.84.
Oregon finished second with 66
points, while Portage was third
with 46.
The boys and girls host the
Stoughton Invitational at 4:30 p.m.
Track and field
Boys golf Girls soccer
Stoughton soccer trifecta
Turn to Track/Page 18
Photo by Anthony Iozzo
Senior Hayley Bach (center) celebrates her second goal against Lake Mills Friday, May 2, at Stoughton High School. Bach
scored three goals in a 3-1 win.
May 8, 2014 Courier Hub ConnectStoughton.com
17
EARLY DEADLINES
Due to the Memorial Day holiday,
the display ad deadline for the May 28, 2014
Great Dane Shopping News
will be Wednesday, May 21 at 3 p.m.
Classified ad deadline will be Thursday, May 22 at Noon
Deadlines for the May 29, 2014
Oregon Observer, Stoughton Courier Hub and Verona Press
will be Friday, May 23 at Noon
In observance of the holiday,
our offices will be closed Monday, May 26.
May 10, 2014
Richland Center, WI - Fairgrounds
$10 Admission 12 and under Free
11:00am ....Snowmobile Grass
Drags
11:00am ....ATV Drags
11:00am ....Dirtbike Drags
11:00am ....Mud Bog
1:00pm .......Badger State Dirt
Flingers & American Mini Pullers
2:00pm ......Kids Pedal Tractor Pull
2:00pm ......Demo Derby
5:00pm.......Truck/Tractor Pull
9:00pm.......Car/Truck Drags
www.hybridredneck.com / 608-604-5068
414 3rd Street, Palmyra 262-495-4453
MULTI-METAL DISTRIBUTION CENTER
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LUMBER & BUILDING SUPPLIES
ROOFING & SIDING
New, Used & Seconds at 43 per sq. ft & up
FABRICATION & CRANE SERVICE
FENCING
262-495-4453 ANICH LUMBER CO. PALMYRA, WI
Panels: 6x8-1x4 DE treated $28 or 6x8-
1x6 w/Custom milled back $30, $25/unit
Round Cedar Fence Posts: $2.49 and up,
lengths to 17
Pickets: Cedar 1x4-6 DE $.90 or 1x6-6
DE treated $.99
Fence Boards: Full 1 thick rough sawn,
1x6-16 pine or oak
Barn Boards: Full 1 thick, 12 width
$.95/lineal ft.
Cedar Siding: 8 bevel $.64/lineal ft.
Steel Roofng & Siding: 38 width $1.39/
lineal ft. and up
OSB Sheathing: 3/4 thick T&G, cut offs
32x48 and larger $.30/sq ft.
Flooring: Prefnished Brazilian Walnut (Tropical IPE)
31/4 and 5 @ $495/sq ft. and up. Also stocking #1
Southern Yellow Pine Dimension Lumber T&G
Knotty Pine: 1x8 T&G units $.49/linear ft
Treated Deck Boards: 5/4 x 6 $.35/lineal ft
Vikings keep busy with make-ups and invites
JEREMY JONES
Sports editor
Stoughton boys tennis
dropped a Badger South Con-
ference dual against Monroe
on its home courts Monday,
5-2.
The Vikings picked up wins
by Gabe Rowley and the 3
doubles team of Will Zeichert
and Breckin Houser.
Rowley survived a first-set
tiebreaker and dominated the
second set to defeat Jeremy
Miller 7-6 (4), 6-2.
Zeichert and Houser added
a 6-0, 6-4 win over Zach Hen-
drickson and Keyton Friske
6-0, 6-4.
Stoughton, Portage (PPD)
The Vikings got in two or
three games at all seven var-
sity flights before rain post-
poned and eventually forced
the cancelation of play last
Thursday.
Stoughton will make the
match up at 4:30 p.m. May
12 at home. The Vikings will
also make-up their April 29
dual at Milton at 4:30 p.m.
May 8.
Stoughton Quad
Stoughton hosted La Crosse
Logan, McFarland and the
Cardinals in Sun Prairie on
Saturday.
The Vikings lost to Sun
Prairie in the opening round
5-2, picking up wins from
Rowley and Landers and Alex
Horneck at No. 3 singles and
2 doubles, respectively.
Despite sweeping all three
doubles matchups, Stoughton
fell 4-3 to La Crosse Logan
after losing three-setters at
Nos. 2-3-4 singles.
Stoughton was unable to
take any of its four completed
matches against McFarland.
Wauwatosa West invite
Austin Scheel and Ash-
er McMullin highlighted
Stoughtons showing at the
Wauwatosa West Invite last
weekend.
Scheel and McMullin lost
their opening-round match
to Franklin 7-5, 6-4 before
fighting back to claim the 1
doubles consolation champi-
onship.
They defeated Wauwatosa
4-6, 6-2, 10-5 and then closed
out their tournament with a
Cedarburg 6-2, 4-6, 10-8 vic-
tory.
The Vikings traveled to
Wauwatosa for an invite
Saturday morning featuring
Franklin, Greendale, Mus-
kego, Cedarburg and Wauwa-
tosa West.
Nathan Lawlor finished
sixth overall at No. 2 singles,
defeating Cedarburg 6-4, 6-2.
Stoughton was without
Rowley and its No. 4 sin-
gles player.
The Vi ki ngs host t he
Stoughton Invitational this
Saturday. Doubles will be
played in Oregon.
Boys tennis Baseball
Photo by Jeremy Jones
Stoughton No. 3 singles player Gabe Ross fought through a neck-and-neck first set to take his match 7-6 (4), 6-2 Monday against
Monroes Jeremy Miller. The Vikings lost the Badger South Conference dual 5-2.
Vikes claim first
in Badger South
ANTHONY IOZZO
Assistant sports editor
Six games into the Bad-
ger South Conference sea-
son and the Stoughton High
School baseball team is 6-0
and in first place after wins
against Madison Edgewood
last Thursday and Fort
Atkinson last Friday.
It is definitely a good
start. We are happy with the
6-0 start, head coach Jer-
emy Dunnihoo said.
Stoughton 7,
Madison Edgewood 3
The Vikings hosted Madi-
son Edgewood last Thursday
and won 7-3.
Stoughton led by a run
before breaking the game
open in the bottom of the
fourth with three runs.
Junior Cade Bunnell and
Sam Ripp each had RBIs.
Senior PJ Rosowski was
2-for-3.
Senior Chris Lund picked
up the win. He went five
innings and allowed no
earned runs on two hits. He
struck out three and walked
one.
Stoughton 13,
Fort Atkinson 5
Stoughton traveled to Fort
Atkinson last Friday in a
makeup game and broke out
at the plate for six runs in the
first en route to a 13-5 win.
I was compl et el y
shocked with how that game
went, especially with the
start, Dunnihoo said. It
was a very pleasant surprise.
I was expecting a very close,
hard fought game.
Junior Cade Bunnell
(3-for-5, four RBIs and two
runs scored), Austin Miller
(2-for-4, two runs scored
and an RBI), senior Chris
Lund (2-for-3, two runs
scored and two RBIs) and
senior PJ Rosowski (2-for-3,
two RBIs) were the leaders
at the plate.
Cole Nelson and Braden
Poirer each added an RBI,
and Tim Johnson (two runs),
Rob Volk (one run), Alex
Zacharias (one run) and
Poirer (one run) all scored
runs.
Rosowski picked up the
win. He went five innings
and allowed no earned runs
on four hits. He struck out
six and walked none. Josh
Eugster finished the game.
He went two innings and
allowed an earned run on
two hits. He struck out one
and walked two.
Alex Bakken picked up
the loss for the Blackhawks.
He went three innings and
allowed six earned runs on
nine hits. He struck out three
and walked four.
Craig 13, Stoughton 3
Stoughton fell to Janes-
ville Craig 13-3 in six
innings on the road at River-
side Park Monday.
Zacharias was 2-for-3 to
lead Stoughton at the plate,
while Lund homered.
Ripp picked up the loss.
He went three innings and
allowed three earned runs on
three hits. He struck out one
and walked five.
Stoughton 7, MH 2
The Vi ki ngs host ed
Mount Horeb Tuesday and
won 7-2.
Jacob Johnson, Brady
Wanniger, Michael Gerber,
Zach Hasselberger, Lund
and Poirer all had RBIs.
Zacharias picked up the
win. He pitched four innings
and allowed no runs on three
hits. He walked two and
struck out two.
18
May 8, 2014 Courier Hub ConnectStoughton.com
Please join Dr. Kat
Egressy, hospitalist, to
learn about COPD and
strategies for coping.
Thursday, May 15th
at Noon
Stoughton Hospital
Bryant Health
Education Center
(lower level)
To register for this free
event, please contact
Sonja at 873-2356 or
pr3@stohosp.com.
Breathing Easier with Age:
COPD & How it Affects You
stoughtonhospital.com
Dr. Kat Egressy
U
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9
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BECOME A FOSTER PARENT
Is it your passion to work with children?
Haseleu wins Joe Shear Classic
Nathan Haseleu of Pardeeville won Fridays Joe Shear
Classic for the ARCA Midwest Tour at Madison Interna-
tional Speedway.Haseleu picked up the win by 0.144 sec-
onds over Kyle Shear. Skylar Holzhausen, Jeremy Miller
and Nick Murgic rounded out the top five.
Haseleu becomes the first repeat winner in the six years
of the Classic.He won the inaugural race in 2009.
Vikings continue
up and down play
JEREMY JONES
Sports editor
Stoughton softball proved
that they can hang with just
about anyone last week
when they played to their
potential, picking up a split
against Badger South Con-
ference rival Fort Atkinson.
Stoughton 4,
Mount Horeb 0
Senior pitcher Sarah
Seaton struck out 10 hitters
and went 3-for-4 at the plate
with three RBIs to power the
visiting Vikings past Mount
Horeb 4-0 on Tuesday.
Samantha Tepp finished
3-for-4 at the plate with a
pair of stolen bases. Morgan
Neuenfeld also went 2-for-4.
Portage 4, Stoughton 2
Stoughton traveled north
to face Portage in a Badger
Conference crossover game
Monday and fell 4-2.
Seaton tossed six innings,
allowing four earned runs on
nine hits and one walk. She
struck out two.
Bailey Vance and Madi
Sehmer each knocked in a
run.
Stoughton, Fort (DH)
Stoughton was finally able
to get its conference game
in against Fort Atkinson last
Friday, making the games up
as a doubleheader.
The Vikings split the con-
tests, taking the first game
4-3 before falling 7-3 in the
nightcap.
Stoughton took advan-
tage of a few defensive mis-
cues to score two runs each
in both the fourth and sixth
innings of the first game.
Seaton scattered eight hits
over seven innings, while
allowing one earned run in
the first game. She struck out
eight.
Tepp (2-for-4), Morgan
Neuenfeld (2-for-3) and
Vance (2-for-3) paced the
Vikings at the plate.
Fort Atkinson started
slow in the second game but
pounced on the Vikings once
Seaton left the pitchers cir-
cle in the fourth inning.
Neuenfeld, Seaton and
Suzy Brickson each drove in
a run in the nightcap.
Stoughton 9,
Edgewood 5
Though it took awhile to
get in, the Vikings prevailed
over the Edgewood for the
second time this season Sat-
urday, winning 9-5.
Seaton had seven strike-
outs.
Tepp went 2-for-4 with
two RBIs, while Neuen-
feld (2-for-2) added an RBI.
Cassie Adams was 2-for-4
with a double.
Madison International Speedway
Friday.
Monroe quad
The Vikings traveled to
Monroe for a quad with
Fort At ki nson, Monona
Grove and Monroe Tues-
day and won wi t h 93
points.
St af f en won t he 400
( 1: 03. 3) and t he 800
(2:26.5). Deutsch won the
300 hurdles (53. 1), and
Weum won the 200 (27.3).
Fr eshman August yna
Br est ar won t he 3, 200
(12:54.7).
BOYS
The St ought on Hi gh
School boys track and field
team finished third last Fri-
day at the Panther Relays
at Oregon High School.
The Vi ki ngs fi ni shed
with 54 points, led by wins
in the high jump relay and
the discus relay.
The high jump team of
senior Luke Logan, sopho-
more Adam Krumholz and
junior Brad Graffin took
first with a height of 16-10,
while the discus team of
senior Kyle Patun, sopho-
more Buck Krueger and
j uni or Ben Brandt won
with a distance of 351-3.
The shot put, sprint med-
ley and 4x200 relay teams
all took second place. The
shot put team of Patun,
Krueger and junior James
Dinges finished with a dis-
tance of 119-7 3/4 , while
the sprint medley of senior
Wi l l Cl ark, sophomore
Josh Hi t chcock, j uni or
Giles France and Logan
took runner-up in 3:51.25.
The 4x200 t e a m of
Clark, Hitchcock, Krum-
holz and Logan took sec-
ond in 1:35.3.
The 4x100 relay, 4x400
relay, triple jump and pole
vault all took third.
4x100 t eam of seni or
Jayce Yellow Bird, sopho-
more Max Quale, junior
Xing Yang and Krumholz
was third in 47.56, while
the 4x400 team of senior
Santiago Sarthou, junior
Ryan Sperl e, freshman
Nathan Moll and fresh-
man Jackson Hampton was
third in 3:46.42.
The t ri pl e j ump t eam
of senior River Hoaglin,
senior Jayce Yellow Bird
and sophomore Jakob Ben-
son had a distance of 113-
5 1/2, and the pole vault
team of Quale and Logan
had a height of 21-0.
Sugar Ri ver won t he
meet with 80 points, while
Oregon was second with
60.
Monroe quad
The Vikings traveled to
Monroe for a quad with
Fort At ki nson, Monona
Grove and Monroe Tuesday
and took second with 65
points.
Freshmen Owen Roe and
Tristan Jenny, Sperle and
Hampton won the 4x800 in
9:08.1. Logan added wins
in the 200 (23.8) and the
400 (53.4).
Track: Boys win high jump and discus relays
Continued from page 16
Merchants blank
Cambridge in debut
Pitcher Jeremy Dunnihoo
held Cambridge to two hits
Sunday as the Stoughton
Merchants rolled 6-0 over
Cambridge in the 2014 sea-
son debut.
Returning to the mound
after battling back problems
a year ago, Dunnihoo struck
out eight over six innings to
earn the win. He struck out
a pair and walked two for
the HTL runner-up.
Erick Sperloen worked
t he fi nal t hree i nni ngs,
striking out four.
Newcomer Kris Rosholt
finished 2-for-2 at the plate
for the Merchants, scor-
ing three runs and adding a
double. Rosholt capped the
blowout by singling home
Scott Nachreiner who had
a pinch hit single in the
eighth inning.
Jake Wenzel (2-for-2)
and T.J. DiPrizio (3-for-5)
each drove in two RBIs.
Scoreless through two
innings, Wenzel doubled
in a run to get Stoughton
rolling in the third inning.
DiPrizio added a two-run
single in the fifth.
Eric Gerber (2-for-5) also
added a pair of hits.
The Merchants travel to
Deerfield this Sunday at 1
p.m. Stoughton opens the
Thursday Night League
t he f ol l owi ng week at
Norse Park against Utica (6
p.m.). The As come back
to town two days later for
their annual Syttende Mai
rivalry game at 2 p.m Sat-
urday. The game will also
mark the grand opening of
the teams new concession
stand.
Ashmore, Bates deliver
against Waterloo
Utica opened the 2014
season Sunday with a 15-7
win over Waterloo.
Brad Ashmore (4-for-6)
doubled twice and drove in
six runs to lead the visiting
As past Waterloo.
Kyle Bates worked nine
innings, striking out 11 for
the win. Bates surrendered
seven hits and walked four
in the win. He gave up four
earned runs.
Doug Vi ke (2-for-4),
Christian Stokstad (2-for-5)
and Mike Lund (3-for-4) all
collected multiple hits for
the As, while Max Gartzke
added a home run for Utica.
The As return to action
Sunday, May 11, at McFar-
l and. Ut i ca t hen opens
Thursday Night League
action at 7 p.m. May 15 at
Stoughton.
The Merchants host Uti-
ca in their annual Syttende
Mai game Saturday, May
17, at 2 p.m.
- Jeremy Jones
Home Talent League Softball
Photos by Jeremy Jones
Stoughton senior Maren Schultz
hands off to Payton Kahl in the
4x200-meter relay Friday at
the Oregon Relays meet. They
joined Rachel Hedman and Mya
Lonnebotn to finish third in the
1 minute, 55.84 seconds. (At
right) Junior Patrick Reiley leads
off the distance medley relay on
Friday.
May 8, 2014 Courier Hub ConnectStoughton.com
19
Stoughton Citywide
Garage Sales
Saturday, June 28, 2014
Your garage sale ad will appear in the
Great Dane Shopping News on Wednesday, June 25
and in the Stoughton Courier Hub on Thursday, June 26.
Only
$
18
00
(includes 15 words)
Additional words 40 each.
Deadline to advertise your garage sale is
Friday, June 20th at Noon.
Ads must be placed in person, by fax, or e-mail. No phone calls.
Payment must be made at time of placing your ad.
135 W. Main Street, Ste. 102, Stoughton 873-6671
E-mail: insidesales@wcinet.com
Office Hours: Monday-Friday 8:30 a.m. - 4 p.m.
Parents & Grandparents
Celebrate Your
Graduates Achievement!
For that special keepsake
place an ad in the
Black & White Ad Color Ad
1 column x 3 inch ad:
$
15
$
39
2 column x 3 inch ad:
$
30
$
54
2 column x 5 inch ad:
$
50
$
85
Contact Diane Beaman
at (608) 873-6671
or insidesales@wcinet.com
for more information

A lifelong local
The Village of Oregon
native has lived in Stough-
ton for the past 27 years.
Hes been married for 31
years, has two adult children
in their 20s, and retired last
year from a 35-year career at
Cummins Inc.
Hes wanted to do the
coast-to-coast journey for the
past 35 years.
It was the culmination of
a longtime dream to ride
across the country, he said.
Connor explained that
as a 21-year-old student at
MATC, he enrolled in a cal-
culus class that he was dread-
ing. But on the first day of
class, instead of doing cal-
culus, his Japanese professor
presented a slide show of his
bike trip across the country
from Washington State to
Boston.
He flew from Japan to
Seattle and then got on a
bicycle, Connor recalled.
He thought the best way to
see America, meet Ameri-
cans and learn English was to
ride his bike across the coun-
try.
From that moment on, I
wanted to do that, he added.
It was an inspiration to me.
But reality intruded on the
dream, and instead Connor
landed a job at Cummins,
married and started a family.
What planning?
Connor started thinking
seriously about taking the
bike trip a few years ago.
He began amping up for it
by taking some long rides
in Wisconsin the Great
Annual Bicycle Adventure
Along the Wisconsin River
(GRABAAWR), and the MS
150.
But he didnt do a lot of
planning, considering it was
a nearly 4,000-mile bike trip.
At first I thought I would
j ust go wi t h my credi t
card and bicycle, he said.
Theres 1,000 different
ways to do it.
After talking with some
experienced long-distance
cyclists and reading about it,
Connor decided to take a tent
and sleeping bag because he
knew there would be some
wide-open spaces between
towns in the West.
That turned out to be one
of the best parts of the trip
the camping part, he said.
That was a real adventure.
I didnt do much planning
on that part, he admits. It
was the last month and I
decided to change the way I
was going to do it.
He also didnt have a pre-
determined route in mind.
Instead, Connor, with his
Trek carbon-fiber bicycle,
flew to Portland, Ore., near
Seaside.
He rode from there to Mis-
soula, Mont., in his first two
weeks on the road.
The journey
By the time hed arrived
in Missoula, Connor had
already cycled up and over
several mountain ranges that
to most Midwesterners might
seem virtually insurmount-
able: the Coastal Range, the
Cascade Range, the Inner
Mountain Range, the Bitter-
root Range and the Rocky
Mountains.
The first two weeks is
where your body is really
adjusting to the rigors of it,
he said. So when you get
down to Missoula, every-
bodys about in the same
shape, whether you trained
or not.
Once hed reached Mis-
soula, Connor was feeling
strong and healthy. Thats
when he decided that he
could actually continue
across the country.
There, he went to visit the
Adventure Cycling Asso-
ciation, where he got profes-
sional advice about the rest
of his trip.
They provided all the
maps, which took all the
stress out of the logistics part
of it, he said. They have
different courses and trails
across the U.S. and they plot
your course.
The association put Con-
nor on roads that are lightly
traveled or on busier roads
with a wide shoulder.
From Missoula, he ped-
aled to Great Falls, Mont.,
and followed the Lewis and
Clark Trail all the way to
Bismarck, the Capital of
North Dakota. From Bis-
marck he rode to Fargo,
N.D., and on to Minneapolis.
From there, Connor cycled
to Stillwater, Minn., and then
down the Mississippi River
to La Crosse. He took bicy-
cle trails from La Crosse to
Sparta, rode the Elroy-Sparta
trail to Reedsburg, and then
cycled on roads to Middle-
ton.
I got to Middleton and
my bike broke down, which
was awesome because my
son works there, Connor
said, with a laugh. My first
breakdown was in Middle-
ton, and my first and only
flat tire was in Pepin, Wis.
After spending a few
days with family at home in
Stoughton, Connor took a
ferry across Lake Michigan
and continued on to Portland,
Maine.
Trials
He said there were only
two times when he consid-
ered quitting.
During the first part of
the trip, I had a lot of anxiety
about where I was going to
stay or where I was going to
eat, what the route was like
Then after a couple of
weeks, my body just settled
into it, he said.
His first real trial was the
result of a saddle sore, near
Walla Walla, Wash. Similar
to the bedsores that afflict the
long-term bedridden, a sad-
dle sore will rub you until
you cant ride anymore,
Connor said. I put every-
thing on it to prevent it, but it
still came and I thought I was
done.
As luck would have it,
however, he met a nurse
where hed gone for a mas-
sage, and she had experience
treating bedsores. She knew
exactly what he needed.
Its like a patch for the
bedsores, he explained.
She got me four of those. I
put it on, and she said in four
days you should be healed
up. And I was. It was amaz-
ing.
The second incident that
nearly broke his spirit hap-
pened in the rolling hills of
eastern Montana.
He left Great Falls and had
made it through the rest of
the mountains.
I thought, Im home
free, he recalled. My big-
gest fear was I couldnt do
the mountains, but I was
through the mountains and I
got into these rollers I call
it dinosaur country, near Jor-
don, Mont.
Connor described a series
of very steep, seemingly
unending hills.
You go up 500 feet and
you come down 500 feet.
And you do that over and
over, all day long for three or
four days, he remembered.
And when you get to the top
of one of them, you can see
for miles all the way to the
end of them. So you see 10
or 12 of them.
And then you go down
and come up and you see
another 10 or 12 of them.
And it just keeps going, like
waves in the ocean.
He compared the land-
scape t o a scene from
Jurassic Park: beautiful and
green, but very hot. The
West had record heat of at
least 100 degree every day
when he was riding through.
On the third or fourth day
of this, Id just had it, he
recalled. I ran out of water.
I got to the top of this huge
hill, and I was just done. I
thought, Ill pull beside the
road and put my head against
one of these big boulders and
Ill bang my head until Im
dead.
Connor stopped beside
the only mailbox within 40
miles, weak and shaking
from dehydration. Just then,
a rancher in a pickup truck
came down the long drive-
way and stopped to talk.
He takes one look at me,
and he goes, Where you
headed? Connor recount-
ed. I tell him Jordon, and
he goes, Thats another 10
miles.
I said, you wouldnt
have any water in your truck,
would you?
He reaches into the back
of this cooler and pulls out
this huge Gatorade and
throws it to me.
He said my eyes just
popped out from my head,
and from then on the last 10
miles were a breeze. It was
just awesome.
The next day, Connor
reached the end of the roll-
ers and cycled into flat
country.
So just when you think
youre done, l i fe t el l s
you youre not done, he
observed. I was saved by
just luck, and the kindness of
a stranger.
Highlights
Connor counts the Bitter-
root Mountains of Idaho, the
Adirondacks of Vermont and
New York, and Niagara Falls
as the most spectacular plac-
es he traveled through.
He was incredibly lucky to
experience only four days of
rain in 68 days of cycling.
In addition to his encoun-
ters with remarkably friendly
and generous people, he said
the trip had a profoundly
calming affect.
He remembers how much
it took out of him, mentally
and physically.
By the time hed reached
Maine, part of me wanted
to keep going and part of me
wanted to have the trip end,
he said.
The part that wanted
the trip to never end was
the mental game. It was so
peaceful. My mind was nev-
er so calm and clear. I never
noticed things as well just
passing flowers and bugs and
being in the here and now.
He said returning to nor-
mal society was like culture
shock: Things moved too
fast, and he felt over stimu-
lated.
During the journey, for
the first time in my life, I was
able to stop the wheels in
my head from spinning, he
said. But when I got to the
East Coast, physically I was
done.
Ride: Connor does coast-to-coast journey from Seaside, Oregon to Portland, Maine
Continued from page 1
Mini Course
Mini Course 4100.101: Bike Your Way Across
Wisconsin and the U.S.A.
When: 6-9 p.m. Tuesday, June 10
Where: Union South
What: Adventure stories, bicycling resources and
lots of fun
How to register: union.wisc.edu/minicourses.htm
Blog
mikebike.madcity.us
20
May 8, 2014 Courier Hub ConnectStoughton.com
Legals
SECTION 00100
ADVERTISEMENT TO BID
CHURCH STREET
AND RIDGE STREET
RECONSTRUCTION
CONTRACT 2-2014
2014 STREET
CONSTRUCTION
CONTRACT 3-2014
STOUGHTON UTILITIES
CITY OF STOUGHTON,
WISCONSIN
Stoughton Utilities and the City of
Stoughton will receive sealed Bids for
the Church Street and Ridge Street Re-
construction and 2014 Street Construc-
tion projects until 11 A.M., local time,
May 20, 2014, at the offce of Stough-
ton Utilities, 600 South Fourth Street,
Stoughton, WI 53589 at which time the
Bids will be publicly opened and read
aloud.
The Work under Contract 2-2014
includes approximately 1,000 linear feet
of water main; 800 linear feet of sanitary
sewer; 350 linear feet of storm sewer;
and appurtenances. The work also in-
cludes 1,400 linear feet of curb and
gutter replacement; 5,000 square feet
of concrete sidewalk and driveway and
apron; 2,600 tons of base course; 800
tons of asphaltic concrete pavement,
turf restoration, and related miscella-
neous work.
The Work under Contract 3-2014
includes approximately 23,000 square
yards of asphalt pavement pulveriza-
tion and grading, 6,000 tons of asphaltic
concrete pavement, 2,800 linear feet of
concrete curb and gutter, 11,000 square
feet of concrete sidewalk, and related
miscellaneous work.
Bids are to be addressed to
Stoughton Utilities, 600 South Fourth
Street, Stoughton, WI 53589 and shall be
marked ?Sealed Bid-Church Street and
Ridge Street Reconstruction-Contract
2-2014? and/or ?Sealed Bid-2014 Street
Reconstruction-Contract 3-2014.?
Complete digital Project Bidding
Documents are available at www.strand.
com or at www.questcdn.com. Down-
load the digital Bidding Documents for
$30 by inputting Quest project num-
ber 3276894 on the website?s Project
Search page. Please contact QuestCDN.
com at (952) 233-1632 or info@
questcdn.com for assistance with free
membership registration, downloading,
and working with this digital project in-
formation.
Bidding Documents may be re-
viewed and paper copies may be ob-
tained from the Issuing Offce which
is Strand Associates, Inc.?, 910 West
Wingra Drive, Madison, WI 53715. A non-
refundable fee of $100 will be required
(shipping and handling fees included).
Overnight mailing of Bidding Docu-
ments will not be provided.
All Bidders submitting a sealed
Bid shall obtain the Bidding Documents
from QuestCDN.com or from Strand As-
sociates, Inc.?
Bidders who submit a Bid must be
a Plan Holder of record at the Issuing Of-
fce. Bids from Bidders who are not on
the Plan Holders List may be returned as
not being responsive.
Plan Holders are requested to pro-
vide an e-mail address if they wish to
receive addenda and other information
electronically. Plan Holders are request-
ed to designate whether they are a prime
contractor, subcontractor, or supplier if
they want this information posted on the
project Plan Holders List.
The Bid must be accompanied by
Bid security made payable to OWNER in
an amount of 10% of the Bidder?s maxi-
mum Bid price.
Bidders shall comply with all provi-
sions of Section 66.0903 of the Wiscon-
sin Statutes with respect to wage scales.
Stoughton Utilities and the City of
Stoughton reserves the right to reject
any or all Bids, to waive any technical-
ity, and to accept any Bid which it deems
advantageous. All Bids shall remain
subject to acceptance for 85 days after
the time set for receiving Bids.
Contract award shall be made
based on the lowest responsive and re-
sponsible Bidder.
Prospective Bidders are required to
complete and submit a prequalifcation
questionnaire with supporting docu-
ments to OWNER (see Instructions to
Bidders). Prequalifcation forms will be
provided with Bidding Document sets.
Completed forms are to be submitted
no later than 11 A.M., local time, on May
15, 2014.
The Smedal Drive and Palmer Street
portions of Contract 3-2014 are funded
in part by the Local Road Improvement
Program of the Wisconsin Department
of Transportation.
The Strand Associates, Inc.? proj-
ect manager is Mark A. Fisher, P.E., and
can be contacted at Strand Associates,
Inc.?, 910 West Wingra Drive, Madison,
WI 53715, (608) 251-4843 regarding the
project.
Published by the authority of Stoughton
Utilities
Sean Grady, Utilities Operations
Superintendent
Dated at Stoughton, Wisconsin
Published: May 1 and 8, 2014
WNAXLP
* * *
ATTENTION:
WEBSITE HOSTING AND
DESIGN COMPANIES
The Stoughton Area School District
is now accepting proposals to redesign
and implement a content management
system to revitalize our web presence
for our parents, community, staff and
students. A content management sys-
tem will provide the infrastructure for
our staff to easily communicate and up-
date District information.
Website Hosting and Design Com-
pany proposals should be submitted to:
Paul Vande Hei
Director of Technology
Stoughton Area School District
320 North Street
Stoughton, WI 53589
A copy of the Request for Propos-
als can be obtained by contacting Paul
Vande Hei at paul.vandehei@stoughton.
l12.wi.us.
The deadline to submit your pro-
posal is Friday, May 16, 2014 at 4:30 p.m.
(CST). SASD requires one signed elec-
tronic version in .pdf format sent to Paul
Vande Hei at paul.vandehei@stoughton.
k12.wi.us.
Published: May 8, 2014
WNAXLP
* * *
NOTICE
TOWN OF
PLEASANT SPRINGS
REQUEST FOR 2014 BIDS
CHIPSEAL SURFACING
TOWN ROADS
The Town of Pleasant Springs Clerk
will receive sealed bids until 2:00 p.m.
on May 19, 2014 at the Town Hall, 2354
CTH N, Stoughton, WI, 53589-2873, dur-
ing offce hours Monday and Tuesday
10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. and Thursday
from noon to 6:00 p.m. The project work
consists of chipseal surfacing on vari-
ous Town roads.
A separate bid must be submitted
for each road. The bidder shall recom-
mend and clearly specify the following
information on each bid form:
BITUMINOUS MATERIAL:
- Asphalt Cement PG 58-28 with no
cutback(Emulsifed asphalts will not be
acceptable)
COVER AGGREGATE
- 3/8 washed, fractured peastone
aggregate coated with no less than 1%
AC Asphalt
MATERIALS QUANTITIES TO BE
USED:
- Asphalt .35 gallons per square
yard (4,200 per 20 foot wide mile)
- Aggregate 24 pounds per square
yard(140 ton per 20 foot wide mile)
- Final total cost for the road, based
on the roads actual width.
CONTRACT REQUIREMENTS:
- All chipsealing work must be com-
pleted by August 15, 2014.
Questions concerning the roads
to be included in the project, as well as
a request to obtain a Bid Specifcation
packet, may be directed to the Public
Works staff by phone at (608) 205-9169
or by fax at (608) 877-9444.
A performance bond in the amount
of 100 percent of the total bid price,
a Certifcate of Insurance naming the
Town as an additional insured, and a
signed contract, will be required of the
successful bidder.
Bid opening will take place on
Monday, May 19, 2014 at 3:00 p.m., or
as soon thereafter as practicable, at the
Town Hall. The Town Board will review
the bids at their meeting on May 20, 2014
and reserves the right to reject any and
all bids, and to accept the bid or bids
deemed to be most advantageous to the
Town.
Bid envelopes must be clearly
marked 2014 ROAD BID and must be
addressed to:
Town of Pleasant Springs
Attn: Town Board
2354 CTH N
Stoughton, WI 53589-2873
/s/ Cassandra Suettinger
Clerk/Treasurer
Published: May 8 and 15, 2014
WNAXLP
* * *
TOWN OF
PLEASANT SPRINGS
NOXIOUS WEED NOTICE
Every person shall destroy all nox-
ious weeds on all lands which he shall
own, occupy or control. The term nox-
ious weeds includes Canada Thistle,
leafy spurge and feld bindweed.
/s/Cassandra Suettinger
Clerk/Treasurer
Published: May 8 and 15, 2014
WNAXLP
* * *
NOTICE
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
I hereby certify that:
VIKING BREW PUB, LLC, VIK C.
MALLING AGENT, dba VIKING BREW
PUB, in the City of Stoughton, Wiscon-
sin, has applied to the Common Council
of the City of Stoughton, Wisconsin, for
a Class B Beer & B Liquor license
for the period ending June 30, 2015, at
the tavern or place of business located
at:
211 E. Main Street
Maria Hougan
City Clerk
Published: May 8, 2014
WNAXLP
* * *
CITY OF STOUGHTON
NOTICE
Liquor License Renewals for the
period of July 1, 2014 through June 30,
2015:
Class A Beer & Liquor:
Marilyn J. Beckman dba All
Through the House, 160 E. Main Street
Bottled Pleasure, Inc., Robert D
Savaske Jr, Agent, dba Stoughton Spir-
its, 965 N. Page Street.
Plaza Liquor, LLC, Sapinder S.
Bharya, Agent, dba Best Plaza Liquor,
1056 W. Main Street.
Ultra Mart Foods LLC, Francisco
Mendez, Agent dba Pick N Save #6390,
1750 Hwy 51/138
Yahara River Grocery Cooperative,
Cindy Cwik, Agent, dba Yahara River
Grocery Cooperative (YRGC), located at
229 E Main St.
Lilystone, Inc., Susan M. Smith,
Agent, dba The Lilystone, 193 W. Main
Street
Class A Beer:
Gurinderdeep Singh Dhillon dba BP
Stop-N-Shop, 1009 W. Main Street
Kwik Trip, Inc., Nichole Marie Gen-
the, Agent, dba Kwik Trip #738, 1231 E.
Main Street
Kwik Trip, Inc., Sarah E. Pierce,
Agent, dba Kwik Trip #739, 517 W. Main
Street
PDQ Food Stores, Inc., Franklin
T. Nelson, Agent, dba PDQ Store #132,
2400 Roby Road
Diamond Jubilee, Inc., Mirza Akhtar
Baig, Agent, dba Food Pantry, 981 N.
Page Street
Wal-Mart Stores East, LP, Joel
Clark, Agent dba Wal-Mart Store #1176,
1800 Hwy 51 West.
Walgreen Corporation, Jeremy Iver-
son, Agent dba Walgreens #07519, 1705
US Hwy 51.
Class B Beer & Liquor:
Banushis LLC, Ilir Banushi, Agent,
dba Banushis Bar & Grill, 800 Nygaard
Street
Laz Bistro & Bar LLC, Cary Lazzaro,
Agent, dba Laz Bistro & Bar, 419 E. Main
Street
The Koffee Kup LLC, Kendall L
Gulseth, Agent, dba The Koffee Kup
Restaurant, 355 E. Main Street
Mandt Community Center, Inc, Bart
Quale, Agent, dba Mandt Community
Center, 400 Mandt Parkway
Lynn M. Hull dba Never Mind, 201
S Sixth St
Gimpy & Gappy, LLC, Rebecca Hal-
back, Agent, dba Rev. Jims, 317 S Divi-
sion Street
Karie R. Manhart dba Sonnys, 151
E. Main Street
VFW Badger Post 328, Jean Torger-
son, Agent, dba VFW Badger Post 328,
200 S. Veterans Road
Nel-Car Corporation, Carter J.
Smith, Agent, dba Viking Lanes, 1410
Hwy 51/138
Danny K. Aaberg dba Whatever, 508
E. Main Street
Robert Veits, Agent dba Cullys
Cocktail Lounge, 210 S. Water Street
Jeanne C. Dunbar, Agent, dba Main
Street Pour House, 364 E. Main St
Deaks Pub & Grill, LLC, Jamie D.
Bush, Agent, dba Deaks Pub & Grill,
1017 Nygaard Street
Famous Yetis LLC, Cale J. Ryan,
Agent, dba Wendigo Tavern, 121 E. Main
Street
Viking Brew Pub LLC, Vik Malling,
Agent, dba Viking Brew Pub, 211 E. Main
Street
Class B Beer & Reserve Class
B Liquor:
Totalpackage, Inc., Rebecca Hal-
bach, Agent dba Victorias, 1501 E. Main
Street
Recroom of Stoughton, Inc., Re-
becca Halbach, Agent dba Rev Jims
Roadhouse II, 111 Chalet Drive
El Rio Grande Restaurant LLC, Ce-
sar Cervantes, Agent dba El Rio Grande
Restaurant, 524 W. Main Street
American Legion Post 59, Elvin
Sonny Swangstu, Agent, dba Ameri-
can Legion Post 59, 803 N Page St.
Class B Beer & Class C Wine:
Pizza Hut of Madison, Inc., Donald
R. Elwood Agent, dba Pizza Hut, 1424
Hwy 51/138
Famous Yetis LLC, Caitlin Way,
Agent, dba Famous Yetis Pizza, 971 N.
Page Street.
BIG SKY LLC, Sean Crowley, Agent,
dba Big Sky Restaurant, 176 E. Main
Street
Brittany E. Barcena, Agent, dba
Nellos Pizza, 135 W. Main Street
Maria P. Hougan
City Clerk
Published: May 8, 2014
WNAXLP
* * *
NOTICE
TOWN OF
PLEASANT SPRINGS
This is to notify anyone it may con-
cern that that Shannon Gabriel Greeno,
agent for Wisconsin Fuels, LLC, d/b/a
I-90 BP, located at 2763 County Highway
N, Cottage Grove, WI, 53527, has applied
for a Class A Fermented Malt Bever-
age License only, for consumption away
from the premises where sold, in the
Town of Pleasant Springs, Dane County,
Wisconsin, for the period from July 1,
2014, through June 30, 2015.
This is to notify anyone it may con-
cern that Road Ranger, LLC., d/b/a Road
Ranger 136,
Agent Michelle S. Hulstein, located
at 2762 County Highway N, Cottage
Grove, WI, 53527, has applied for a Class
A Fermented Malt Beverage License
in the Town of Pleasant Springs, Dane
County, Wisconsin, for the period of July
1, 2014 through June 30, 2015.
This is to notify anyone it may
concern that Laura A. Rowley, agent
for Springers of Lake Kegonsa, Inc.,
d/b/a Springers, located at 3097 Sun-
nyside Street, Stoughton, WI, 53589,
has applied for a Class B Liquor and
Fermented Malt Beverage License in the
Town of Pleasant Springs, Dane County,
Wisconsin, for the period of July 1, 2014
through June 30, 2015.
This is to notify anyone it may con-
cern that Connie M. Geishirt, agent for
Pleasant Springs Pub, Inc., located at
2630 County Road N, Stoughton, WI,
53589, has applied for a Class B Liquor
and Fermented Malt Beverage License
in the Town of Pleasant Springs, Dane
County, Wisconsin, for the period of July
1, 2014 through June 30, 2015
/s/Cassandra Suettinger
Clerk/Treasurer
Published: May 8, 2014
WNAXLP
* * *
NOTICE OF THE
BOARD OF REVIEW FOR
THE TOWN OF
PLEASANT SPRINGS
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the
Board of Review for the Town of Pleas-
ant Springs of Dane County shall meet
on Thursday May 22, 2014, beginning at
5:30 p.m. at the Pleasant Springs Town
Hall, 2354 County Road N, Stoughton,
Wisconsin, for the purpose of reviewing
and examining the assessment roll of
real and personal property in said town,
and all sworn statements and valuations
of real and personal property therein,
and of correcting all errors in said roll
whether in description or otherwise, and
to perform such other duties imposed
by law.
Please be advised of the follow-
ing requirements to appear before the
Board of Review and procedural require-
ments if appearing before the Board:
No person shall be allowed to ap-
pear before the Board of Review, to
testify to the Board by telephone, or to
contest the amount of any assessment
of real or personal property if the per-
son has refused a reasonable written
request by certifed mail of the Assessor
to view such property.
After the frst meeting of the Board
of Review and before the Boards fnal
adjournment, no person who is sched-
uled to appear before the Board of Re-
view may contact, or provide informa-
tion to, a member of the Board about the
persons objection except at a session
of the Board.
No person may appear before the
Board of Review, testify to the Board
by telephone or contest the amount of
assessment unless, at least 48 hours
before the frst meeting of the Board
or at least 48 hours before the objec-
tion is heard if the objection is allowed
because the person has been granted a
waiver of the 48-hour notice of an intent
to fle a written objection by appearing
before the Board during the frst two
hours of the meeting and showing good
cause for failure to meet the 48-hour no-
tice requirement and fles a written ob-
jection, that the person provides to the
Clerk of the Board of Review notice as to
whether the person will ask for removal
of any Board members and, if so, which
member will be removed and the per-
sons reasonable estimate of the length
of time that the hearing will take.
When appearing before the Board,
the person shall specify, in writing, the
persons estimate of the value of the
land and of the improvements that are
the subject of the persons objection
and specify the information that the per-
son used to arrive at that estimate.
No person may appear before the
Board of Review, testify to the Board
by telephone or subject or object to a
valuation; if that valuation was made by
the Assessor or the Objector using the
income method; unless the person sup-
plies the Assessor all of the information
about income and expenses, as speci-
fed in the manual under Sec. 73.03(2a),
that the Assessor requests. The Town of
Pleasant Springs has an ordinance for
the confdentiality of information about
income and expenses that is provided
to the Assessor under this paragraph
which provides exemptions for persons
using information in the discharge of
duties imposed by law or of the duties
of their offce or by order of a court. The
information that is provided under this
paragraph, unless a court determined
that it is inaccurate, is not subject to the
right of inspection and copying under
Section 19.35(1) of Wis. Statutes.
The Board shall hear upon oath,
by telephone, all ill or disabled persons
who present to the Board a letter from
a physician, surgeon or osteopath that
confrms their illness or disability. No
other persons may testify by telephone.
Please note that, upon reasonable
notice, efforts will be made to accom-
modate the needs of disabled individu-
als through appropriate aids and ser-
vices. For additional information, or to
request this service contact Clerk/Trea-
surer Cassandra Suettinger, at the Town
Hall, 2354 County Rd N, Stoughton,
WI, 53589-2873. Offce hours: Monday,
Tuesday - 10am to 4pm, and Thursday
- noon to 6 p.m. Tel (608) 873-3063 Fax
(608)877-9444 E-mail CTTOPS@tds.net
/s/ Cassandra Suettinger, Clerk/
Treasurer
Town of Pleasant Springs
Posted: April 25, 2014
Published: May 8 and 15, 2014
WNAXLP
* * *
DIVISION 00
PROCUREMENT
AND CONTRACTING
REQUIREMENTS
SECTION 00 11 16
INVITATION TO BID
STOUGHTON AREA
SCHOOL DISTRICT
320 NORTH STREET
STOUGHTON, WISCONSIN
Stoughton Senior High School Fa-
ade Remodel and Repair FEI Project
Number 111103.3 April 28, 2014
Owner desires to receive bids on
the following work, to be completed no
later than September 5, 2014.
Location: Stoughton Senior High
School, Regions A, C, and D, 600 Lincoln
Ave. Stoughton WI.
The Work: Furnish and install brick
cladding to existing brick masonry wall
construction including the existing can-
opy columns. Furnish and install brick
cladding and structural and architectur-
al steel for the canopy embellishments.
Foundation work also required.
Distribution: Bidding documents
will be distributed via Blueprints, Inc.
(BPI), Madison offce, (608) 242-7200,
http://www.bpiinc.com.
Deadlines: Bid Documents avail-
able: April 28, 2014
BIDS DUE: May 15, 2014
Earliest Possible Construction
Start: June 2, 2014
Contracting: A single contract will
be executed for the various trades. Own-
er reserves the right to waive irregulari-
ties and to reject bids.
Sincerely,
Stoughton Area School District (Owner)
Facility Engineering, Inc. (Owners
Representative)
101 Dempsey Road Madison, WI 53714
608-240-9110 608-240-9112 (fax)
Published: May 8, 2014
WNAXLP
* * *
Pe r f or mi ng a t t he
Stoughton Opera House is
a much different experi-
ence than what Ive done
in New York City because
I dont know anyone in the
audience there, she told
the Hub in a 2009 inter-
view. Its sort of a more
anonymous, music-making
experience whereas singing
at the Opera House is much
more intimate.
The 2001 graduate of
St ought on Hi gh School
earned two degrees from
Lawrence University in
Appl et on t hr ough t he
school s doubl e-degree
program: a bachelor of arts
degree in music education
(with voice as her chosen
emphasis for the music
degree) and a bachelor of
arts degree in English.
Ive been singing my
whole life, she said. Ear-
ly on in high school I was
thinking I wanted to go to
college and study piano,
but I was also interested in
teaching.
It wasnt until her final
year of college that she
decided to try to make a go
of operatic singing.
Houser:
Singer returns
Continued from page 1
up recommendations on
two programs, including
professional development
f or t eacher s. Sandhi l l
Elementary School first-
grade teacher Dave War-
muth was part of the study
group and headed up the
first-grade Math Expres-
sions pilot team (there
was also an eighth-grade
pi l ot program), and he
said teachers involved are
seeing dramatically dif-
ferent results in math than
we did before.
Wa r mu t h s a i d t h e
i mpl ement at i on of t he
pilot program for his first-
graders has been remark-
able, and students are
more readily catching on
to math concepts with the
new system.
The fear of addition
and subtraction was not
there, he said. Students
love when its math time.
The new syst em has
some different jargon and
methodology, which can
pose a challenge to teach-
ers used to a certain style.
But st udent s, Warmut h
said, are the beneficiaries.
We spend a lot of time
di scussi ng how t o
solve the problems, and
how di f f er ent answer s
can come about, he said.
Kids spend a lot of time
discussing with partners or
in group discussion, show-
i ng di fferent ways t he
problems can be solved,
and they are excited to do
that in the classroom. Its
pretty remarkable.
Si ngl et ar y sai d new
courses will be phased in
during the next several
years, with college prep
math for grades 6-8 and
algebra I beginning next
year, geometry in 2015-16
and algebra and calculus
in 2016-17.
Teacher s ar e pr et t y
excited about this, she
sai d. They r e f eel i ng
much happi er knowi ng
t hat at t he end of fi rst
grade, you are going to
know this stuff, and were
going to build on it, not
repeat it over and over
again.
School calendar
Stoughton Area School
Di st ri ct superi nt endent
Tim Onsager listed several
upcoming Coffee with
the superintendent ses-
sions
The first will be 7:30-
8:30 a.m. Tuesday, May
20, at Kegonsa Elemen-
tary School. Two more
that week are 7:30-8:30
a.m. Wednesday, May 21,
at Fox Prai ri e El emen-
tary School and 7:30-8:30
a.m. Thursday, May 22,
at Sandhi l l El ement ary
School.
Energy Star
recognition
The St ought on Ar ea
School District is one of
nine districts in the state
in which all of the K-12
schools have earned the
Energy Star certification,
according to Leaders in
Efficiency: Energy Star
Buildings in Wisconsin,
a report produced by Mad-
ison-based Cool Choices
in collaboration with the
Wi sconsi n Sust ai nabl e
Building Council and the
Great Plains Institute.
The report examined the
market uptake of Ener-
gy Star certification for
buildings in Wisconsin,
which has grown from 43
buildings in 2000 to 582
certified buildings as of
Dec. 31.
Energy Star is a U. S.
Environmental Protection
Agency (EPA) voluntary
program that helps busi-
nesses and i ndi vi dual s
save money and protect
our climate through supe-
rior energy efficiency.
Math: New program will be phased in during the next several years
Continued from page 1
On the web
For more information about CCSS,
visit
commoncore.dpi.wi.gov.
Why is Common Core important?
Wisconsin adopted the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) as
Wisconsins mathematics and English language arts standards in 2010.
According to the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, they are
rigorous, internationally-benchmarked standards that are designed to ensure
that students leave school with the knowledge and skills needed to succeed in
college and careers. The standards, which are not part of a national or state
curriculum, were developed by a team of experts, educators and stakeholders
in a process led by the National Governors Association and the Council of
Chief State School Officers.
Beginning in the 2014-15 school year, Wisconsins state assessment will be
based on the CCSS.
The fear of addition and subtraction was
not there. Students love when its math
time.
Dave Warmuth
first-grade teacher
May 8, 2014 Courier Hub ConnectStoughton.com
21
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5
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(608) 873-9141
www. moyersinc. net
936 Starr School Road Stoughton, WI
Now Through Sunday May 11
th
Mothers Day Sale!
15% Off For Mom!
Roses
Azaleas
Hydrangeas
Cash & Carry
Hours:
M-F: 8am - 6pm
Sat: 8am - 4pm
Sun: 10am - 4pm
Moyers Inc.
Landscape Services & Hometown Nurseries
Come See .. Belgards Mobile Showroom!
U
N
3
4
2
5
3
9
MOTHERS DAY
BRUNCH
May 11, 8:30am-1:30pm
Adults $10.50 Children 10-5 $5.00 4 & under Free
Eggs Bacon & Sausage Fried Potatoes
Biscuits & Gravy French Toast
Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Roast Beef Chicken
Vegetable Fresh Fruit Dinner Roll
Please Make Reservations by calling
873-9042
Walk Ins Welcome
V.F.W. Badger Post 328
200 Veterans Road Stoughton
U
N
3
4
8
0
8
6
Memorials for those we love and remember.
WISCONSIN MONUMENT & VAULT CO.
159 W. Main St. 873-5513
Serving Stoughton since 1989.
U
N
3
4
3
5
0
7
Thank
You
Mom!
James A. Onsrud
James A. Onsrud, age 83,
passed away on Sunday,
April 27, 2014, at the VA
Hospital in Madison, sur-
rounded by his family. He
was born in Stoughton on
April 2, 1931, son of Halvor
and Thora (Hanson) Onsrud.
James graduated from
Stoughton High School in
1 9 4 9 . He
ent ered t he
U . S . A i r
F o r c e i n
1949 and was honorably
discharged in 1952. James
joined the Wisconsin Air
National Guard as a full
time air technician in 1954
and was discharged in 1963.
He was employed by Cum-
mings Enterprises until he
retired in 1994.
On April 20, 1957, James
married Mary Olson. He was
a member of First Lutheran
Church, and the Stoughton
American Legion.
James is survived by his
wife of 57 years, Mary;
son, Larry; grandchildren,
Christopher (Kristin) and
Stephanie (Nate) Smith;
great-grandchild Dominick;
brother, Jerry of Colorado,
and sister in-law Nancy
Havey.
He was preceded in death
by his parents; son, Michael;
brothers, Donald and Har-
old; and sisters, Gladys
Harried, Ruth Ehle, Hazel
Solem and Wanda Trulson;
and brother in-laws Howard
Olson and Arne Havey.
Memorial services were
held on Saturday, May 3,
2014, at First Lutheran
Church in Stoughton, with
the Rev. Richard Halom
officiating. Military honors
followed.
The family would like to
extend a special thank you
to the staff of the Madison
Veterans Hospital.
James will be greatly
missed by his wife, son,
and grandchildren. He will
always be in our thoughts
and prayers.
Cress Funeral Home
206 W. Prospect Street
Stoughton, WI 53589
873-9244
CressFuneralService.com
Trygve Lonnebotn
Trygve Lonnebotn passed
away on April 29, 2014,
from heart failure.
Trygve was born and
grew up in Bergen, Nor-
way. He remembered the
Ger man occupat i on of
Norway during World War
II well as their house was
right next to a German
camp.
Aft er compl et i ng hi s
mandatory military service,
he attended the Technical
University in Trondheim,
Norway, graduating in 1963
with a Masters Degree in
Chemical Engineering.
In the summer of 1963,
he worked as a lab techni-
cian at Ray-O-Vac cor-
poration (now Spectrum
Brands). He was offered a
permanent position there
and returned in 1965. Over
the years he held many
posi t i ons of i ncreasi ng
responsibility in the com-
pany. These included plant
manager, general manager
of the button cell business,
Vice President of Technol-
ogy and Executive Vice
President of Operations.
Trygve retired in 1999.
He was involved in many
Norwegian-American orga-
nizations. This included the
Norwegian Luncheon Club
Madi son Tor ske Kl ub-
ben Charitable Founda-
tion focusing on providing
scholarships to Norwegian
graduate students attend-
ing the University of Wis-
consin-Madison. He also
served as the president of
the Madison-Oslo Sister
City Committee and as a
trustee at the Vesterheim
Museum.
In 1996 he was appointed
Honorary Consul represent-
ing Norway for the state of
Wisconsin. In 2005, he was
awarded the Order of Merit,
Knight First Class, by the
king of Norway.
Trygve is survived by
his samboer of more than
twenty years, Melany Stin-
son Newby, Grynet Lon-
nebotn, mother of his chil-
dren, and also by his daugh-
ter Anne Lindblom (Scott)
and their children Christian
and Cecilie and by his son
Paal Lonnebotn (Kathleen)
and their children Jack,
Mya, and Ava. He also has
a brother, Petten, and a sis-
ter, Ingri, in Norway and
numerous cousins.
Funeral services were
held at the Cress Center
Monday, May 5, 2014.
In lieu of flowers, memo-
rials may be donated to
the Madison Torske Klub-
ben Foundation, Treasurer
Raymond Weihofen, 3590
Sabaka Trail, Verona, WI
53593.
The family would like
to extend their gratitude to
Agrace HospiceCare, Inc.
for the care and support
they provided. Trygve left
us the way he tried to live,
with a smile on his lips and
a song in his heart.
James A. Onsrud
Trygve Lonnebotn
Obituaries
22
May 8, 2014 Courier Hub ConnectStoughton.com
143 NOTICES
WCAN (Wisconsin Community Ad Net-
work) and/or the member publications
review ads to the best of their ability.
Unfortunately, many unscrupulous people
are ready to take your money! PLEASE BE
CAREFUL ANSWERING ANY AD THAT
SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE!
For more information, or to file a com-
plaint regarding an ad, please contact The
Department of Trade, Agriculture & Con-
sumer Protection 1-800-422-7128 (wcan)
340 AUTOS
DONATE YOUR Car, Truck, Boat to Heri-
tage for the Blind. Free 3-Day Vacation.
Tax Deductible. Free Towing. All paper-
work taken care of! 800-856-5491 (wcan)
342 BOATS & ACCESSORIES
BOAT WORLD Over 700 New & Used
Pontoons, Fishing Boats, Deck Boats, Ski-
boats, Bass & Walleye Boats, Cuddys,
Cruisers up to 35 feet & Outboards @ the
Guaranteed Best Price! Crownline/Axis/
Malibu/Triton/Alumacraft/MorrocraftMisty
Harbor & Crest Pontoons. American Marine
& Motorsports Super Center, Shawano.
Where Dreams come True. 866-955-2628
www.americanmarina.com (wcan)
SHOREMASTER DOCK & LIFT
Headquarters. New & Used. We do it
all.Delivery/Assembly/Install/Removal
American Marine & Motorsports,
Schawano = Save
866-955-2628 (wcan)
355 RECREATIONAL VEHICLES
ATVS SCOOTERS & Go-Karts. Youth ATV's
& Scooters (80mpg) @ $49/mo. Sport & 4x4
Atv's @ $69/mo. American Marine & Motor-
sports, Schawano =Save= 866-955-2628
www.americanmarina.com (wcan)
360 TRAILERS
TRAILERS @ LIQUIDATION Pricing.
Boat, ATV, Sled or Pontoons. 2 or 4
Place/Open or Enclosed. American
Marine, Shawano 866-955-2628 www.
americanmarina.com (wcan)
402 HELP WANTED, GENERAL
FOUR WINDS Manor, Inc., Verona,
is now hiring dedicated caregivers.
If you share our committment to a
positive attitude, respect for residents,
and are a team player who enjoys
working with the elderly please
consider joining us. We have various
shifts and positions available. A part
time housekeeper from 8am-2pm
in our assisted living facility. A full
time RN for the NOC shift. Full time
PM and NOC shift CNA's for our 60
bed skilled facility. A full time NOC
Resident Assistant for our CBRF and
part time PM shift. These positions
include every other weekend and
holidays with shift differential for
PM, NOC and weekends. Excellent
benefits with full time hours including
health, dental, PTO, flex spending
and 401K. Applications available at
www.fourwindsmanor.com or
303 S Jefferson St.

FULL TIME Cook. Immediate opening at
Koffee Kup Restaurant in Stoughton. Pay
based on experience. Apply in person at:
355 E. Main
FULL TIME manufacturing
position. Responsible, organized
& dependable. Apply At: Midwest
Rubber, 250 Industrial Circle,
Stoughton, WI 53589

PT ADMIN Assistant 20 hrs. pr/wk.
Tuesday-Friday 8:30-1:30. MS Office
experience. Bookkeeping. Full job
description at fpcoregonwi.org.
E-mail resume to: oregonfpc@gmail.com
SKI AND Furniture Service Person.
We are now accepting applications
for a part time and full time service
position working in our warehouse in
summer and our ski shop in winter.
This is an entry level position which
includes: unloading shipments,
assembling furniture, assisting on
deliveries, along with ski tuning and
repairs. Individual should have some
downhill skiing experience and a good
driving record. Chalet is a fun and
friendly place to work and we have
great appreciation for our employees
and customers. These positions are
year round jobs with flexible shifts on
weekdays and weekends. We offer
a generous starting salary with paid
training, free skiing at local hills, a
clean non-smoking work environment
and opportunities for advancement.
Apply in person at: Chalet Ski & Patio
5252 Verona Rd, Madison, Wl 53711
608-273-8263

SUMMER HELP 18 Years old+. Vehicle
needed. 40 HRS/Week. Some week-
end and holidays required. Moderate to
heavy lifting. Dependability a must. $11-
12.50 pr/hr. Apply: Nantucket Apts. 3141
Stratton Way, Madison. 608-848-3070
TINA'S HOME CLEANING
Hiring personnel for residential
cleaning position. Days only. Become
a part of our growing Team!
Call 608-835-0339
tinashomecleaning@gmail.com
TNT FIREWORKS IS looking for tent
operators. Make $1500-$3K in 8-10
days. No upfront money. Small credit
inquiry required. Call Matthew at
715-797-6885
WANTED:
Part-Time Teacher to Tutor
Students at Various Grade Levels.
Please Call Norland Learning Center
608-497-1299
449 DRIVER, SHIPPING &
WAREHOUSING
$2000 SIGN On Bonus! Class A 2yrs
Exp Company Drivers .44cpm East &
.40 all other Health/Dental/401K-Local,
Regional & OTR Owner Op's 78% of line
haul 100% FS Plate Program, No elec-
tronics Tom: 800-972-0084 x6855
FLATBED DRIVERS. New Pay Increase.
Great Miles/ Pay & Home time, New
2014 trucks w/APU's & Refrigerator. Full
Benefits + Flatbed Equipment Supplied.
CDL-A, 2yrs exp. 855-219-5996
OTR DRIVERS WANTED
Above Average Mileage Pay including
Performance and Safety BONUSES!
Health/Dental/Vision/HSA/Matching
401K/Vacation pay and Holiday Pay.
Avg 2500-3500 miles/week 100% No
Touch 12 mo. CDL/A Exp Preferred
888-545-9351 ext 13 Jackson, WI www.
doublejtransprot.com (wcan)
453 VOLUNTEER WANTED
COMMUNITY ACTION Coalition for South
Central WI is seeking volunteers to help with
the National Association of Letter Carriers
Stamp Out Hunger food drive on May 10.
We need energetic groups or individuals of
all ages who can lift up to 25lbs. and enjoy
fast, fun and hard work.Volunteers will be
loading mail vehicles that are stuffed with
food donations. MTILP, Inc. is day center
for clients with disabilities. We are looking
for volunteers to help with set up, clean up &
activities during our 3rd annual Prom May 22.
volunteers could also assist with shopping
and creating decorations for the event. Unit-
ed Way 2-1-1 is looking for new volunteers to
become Information and Referral Specialists.
Out volunteers staff our telephone lines,
answering questions about resources avail-
able in the service area. Volunteers work one
4-hour shift/week between 8am-5pm with a
1-year commitment. The next training ses-
sion is May 14th. Call the Volunteer Center at
246-4380 or visit www.volunteeryourtime.org
for more information or to learn about other
volunteer opportunities.
THEY SAY people dont read those little
ads, but YOU read this one, didnt you?
Call now to place your ad, 873-6671 or
835-6677.
508 CHILD CARE & NURSERIES
SMALL INHOME Daycare- Stoughton
Has an opening for one school age child.
Call Maria at 877-1196
548 HOME IMPROVEMENT
A&B ENTERPRISES
Light Construction/Remodeling
No job too small
608-835-7791
ALL THINGS BASEMENTY! Basement
Systems Inc. Call us for all your base-
ment needs! Waterproofing? Finishing?
Structural Repairs? Humidity and Mold
Control? Free Estimates! Call 888-929-
8307 (wcan)
ASPHALT SEAL COATING Crack
filling, striping No job too small. Call
O & H at 608-845-3348
or 608-832-4818

DOUG'S HANDYMAN SERVICE
GUTTER CLEANING
"Honey Do List"
No job too small
608-845-8110
HALLINAN-PAINTING
WALLPAPERING
**Great-Spring-Rates**
35 + Years Professional
Interior/Exterior
Free-Estimates
References/Insured
Arthur Hallinan
608-455-3377
NIELSEN'S
Home Improvements
Repairs, LLC
Kitchens/Bathrooms
Wood & Tile Flooring
Decks/Clean Eaves
*Free Estimates* Insured*
*Senior Discounts*
Home 608-873-8716
Cell 608-576-7126
e-mail zipnputts@sbcglobal.net

TOMAS PAINTING
Professional, Interior,
Exterior, Repairs.
Free Estimates. Insured.
608-873-6160
554 LANDSCAPING, LAWN,
TREE & GARDEN WORK
AFFORDABLE QUALITY Services LLC:
Lawn Mowing & Trim, Reseeding, Aera-
tion, Mulch, Shrub Trimming, Sidewalk
Edging Call Matt Nardi for estimate:
608.609.3600 or snowplow@tds.net.
Dependable, Experienced and Fully
Insured. Service areas: Middleton, Mt.
Horeb, Oregon, Verona, West Madison
ARTS LAWNCARE- Mowing,
trimming, roto tilling, Garden
maintenance available.608-235-4389
JAYS LAWN MAINTENANCE
Spring Cleanup, Garden Roto tilling
Lawn mowing, Brick and Flagstone
walkways and patios, Hedge Trimming
608-728-2191
LAWN MOWING Residential and com-
mercial. 608-873-7038
ROTOTILLING, SKIDLOADER, Small
Dumptruck for Brooklyn, Oregon, Evans-
ville and surrounding areas. 608-513-
8572, 608-206-1548
SHREDDED TOPSOIL
Shredded Garden Mix
Shredded Bark
Decorative Stone
Pick-up or Delivered
Limerock Delivery
Ag Lime Spreading
O'BRIEN TRUCKING
5995 Cty D, Oregon, WI
608-835-7255
www.obrientrucking.com
SNOWMARE ENTERPRISES
Property Maintenance
Lawn Mowing
Bush Trimming
Powerwash Houses
Spring/Summer Clean-Up
Gutter Cleaning
608-219-1214
THE Courier Hub CLASSIFIEDS, the
best place to buy or sell. Call 873-6671
or 835-6677.
560 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
10% AMERICANS have a drug or alco-
hol addiction. You can not fight it alone.
Start your recovery now. Most insurance
accepted. Call 800-849-0986 (wcan)
APPLIANCE REPAIR
We fix it no matter where
you bought it from!
800-624-0719 (wcan)
MY COMPUTER WORKS - Computer
Problems? Viruses, Spyware, Email,
Printer Issues, Bad Internet Connec-
tions - FIX IT NOW! Professional, US
based technicians. $25 off service. Call
for immediate help. 888-885-7944 (wcan)
ONE CALL DOES IT ALL! Fast and
Reliable Handyman Services. Call Ser-
viceLive and get referred to a pro today.
Call 800-604-2193 (wcan)
576 SPECIAL SERVICES
2EYEZ 4 Pawz Pet sitting and dog walk-
ing. 5 yrs experience. Call Tara 279-3330
BANKRUPTCY- STOUGHTON and sur-
rounding area. Merry Law Offices. 608-
205-0621. No charge for initial consulta-
tion. "We are a debt relief agency. We
help people file for bankruptcy relief
under the bankruptcy code."
RESEARCH SERVICES: We locate
Family, Former Friends, Neighbors
Classmates, Co-workers.
Joy 608-712-6286
586 TV, VCR & ELECTRONICS
REPAIR
DIRECTV 2 Year Savings Event. Over
140 channels only $29.99 a month. Only
Directv gives you 2 years of savings and
a FREE Genie upgrade! Call 800-320-
2429 (wcan)
DISH TV RETAILER. Starting at $19.99/
mo for 12 mos. High Speed Internet
starting at $14.95/month (where
available) Save! Ask about same day
installation! Call now -
800-374-3940 (WCAN)
REDUCE YOUR Cable Bill! Get whole-
home Satellite system installed at NO
COST and programming starting at
$19.99/mo. FREE HD/DVR Upgrade to
new callers, so call now. 888-544-0273
(wcan)
604 APPLIANCES
FOR SALE 30" GE Stove
Self cleaning. $300. 608-424-0141
606 ARTICLES FOR SALE
PROM DRESS SALE! Hundreds of
dresses. Save $50 to 50% OFF. Edith's
Fond du Lac & Princess Prom, Fox Rover
Mall, Appleton. www.ediths.com (wcan)
636 COMPUTERS & ACCESSORIES
HP MEDIA CENTER Computer.
Flat screen, wired mouse, tower,
remote, keyboard. Mega Memory to use
for recording, streaming. New in 2005.
Make offer. 608-669-2243
648 FOOD & DRINK
ENJOY 100%GUARANTEED, delivered
to the door Omaha Steaks! SAVE 74%
plus 4 FREE burgers - The Family Value
Combo - ONLY $39.99. ORDER today.
800-831-1898 Use Code 49381GVT or
www.OmahaSteaks.com/sp25 (wcan)
SHARI'S BERRIES: ORDER mouthwa-
tering gifts! 100% satisfaction guaran-
teed. Fresh-dipped berries from $19.99
+ plus s/h. Save 20% on qualifying gifts
over $29! Call 800-975-3296 or visit
www.berries.com/happy (wcan)
650 FURNITURE
1960'S MATCHING 3-piece Maple bed-
room set. Very good condition. 608-
253-4073
ANTIQUE DESK: Special features
include: Burl Wood drawer fronts with
Ebonized wood drop pulls, pull out
desk top, carved wood embellish-
ments & cylinder roll top. Measures:
41.5Wx25"Dx42"H. $1000. 608-835-
9421
CHINA HUTCH: Excellent condition
58"Wx40"Dx80"H Constructed w/select
hardwood Oak finish. Lighted, glass
shelves w/mirror, 2 pieces. $1500. 608-
835-9421
652 GARAGE SALES
MOVING SALE 247 Orchard Dr.
Oregon. May 7-9, 8am-4pm. Everything
goes! Furniture.
STOUGHTON- 1309 & 1317 Moline St.
5/8 11am-7pm, 5/9 8am-6pm, 5/10 8am-
2pm. Hugh 5 family Sale. A whole garage
full of clothes, the other full of household
and misc. items. Boys and girls clothes,
infant to teen sizes, Men and Women's
misc sizes, shoes, new and like new.
Basketball shoes, cleats, baseball pants,
Paparazzi Jewelry, Thirty-One Bags,
crafty items, kids items, household and
too much to mention. See Craigslist
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS Noon Fri-
day for the Courier Hub unless changed
because of holiday work schedules.
STOUGHTON- 1936 W Main( corner of
Hoel & Main) 5/8 Noon-6, 5/9 7-5, 5/10
7-?. Huge Annual Garage Sale: House-
hold, tons of clean clothing (inc. Mens
XL-4X) See Craigsllist.
STOUGHTON- 1937 W Main 5/8 11am-
5:30pm, 5/9 7:30am-5:30pm 5/10 8am-?
Huge Multi-family. Kids-adult clothing.
Toys, books, shoes, household misc,
furniture, Brinks Floor safe, sections of
Neighborhood fence
STOUGHTON- 3065 Shadyside Dr. 5/8
2pm-7pm, 5/9 8am-5pm. Hundreds of
items, including high quality name brand
Children's (sz 12-18), Women's & Men's
Clothing. Like new household items, fur-
niture, linens, towels, fabric, pictures,
home furnishings, books, toys & much
more!
STOUGHTON- 421 Nottingham 5/9-5/10
7am-3pm. Lg/Med dog crates, Hunting
bow, student desk, patio umbrella, stereo
cabinet, Avon car, decanters, household
misc.
STOUGHTON- 501 Kensington Sq 5/8-
5/9 8am-4pm. 5/10 8am-noon. Boys
clothes- new born to 4T. Toys, Pained
Quilt Patterns on Boards, Donuts, Lefse
and Misc
STOUGHTON- 809 & 817 Larvik Lane
5/8 2pm-7pm, 5/9 8am-? Annual Garage
Sale. Everything from A-Z
VERONA 409 Westlawn Ave. Craft
Sale and Bake Sale. May 8-10. 8:00am-
4:00pm.
664 LAWN & GARDEN
3'-12' EVERGREEN and Shade Trees.
Pick Up or Delivery! Planting available.
Detlor Tree Farms
715-335-4444 (wcan)
666 MEDICAL & HEALTH SUPPLIES
MEDICAL GUARDIAN Top-rated medi-
cal alarm and 24/7 monitoring. For a
limited time, get free equipment, no acti-
vation fees, no commitment, a 2nd water-
proof alert button for free and more. Only
$29.95 per month. 800-281-6138
SAFE STEP WALK-IN TUB Alert for
Seniors. Bathrooms falls can be fatal.
Approved by Arthritis Foundation. Thera-
peutic Jets. Less than 4 inch step-in.
Wide door. Anti-slip floors. American
made. Installation included. Call 888-
960-4522 for $750. off (wcan)
668 MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
AMP: LINE 6 Spider IV 75 watt guitar
amp. Tons of built in effects, tuner, and
recording options. Like new, rarely used,
less than 2 years old. Asking $250 OBO.
call 608-575-5984
GUITAR: FENDER American made
Standard Stratocaster guitar. Tobacco
burst finish, mint condition. Includes
tremelo bar, straplocks, and custom fit-
ted Fender hard-shell case. Asking $950
OBO. Call 608-575-5984
676 PLANTS & FLOWERS
PROFLOWERS- ENJOY 33% Off our
spectacular bouquet with FREE choco-
lates. $19.99 plus s/h. Plus, as a special
bonus take 20% off all products over $29.
Go to www.proflowers.com/ActNow. or
call 800-315-9042 (wcan)
688 SPORTING GOODS
& RECREATIONAL
WE BUY Boats/RV/Pontoons/ATV's &
Motorcycles! "Cash Paid" now. Ameri-
can Marine & Motorsports Super Center,
Shawano 866-955-2628 www.american-
marina.com (wcan)
692 ELECTRONICS
NINTENDO 64 VIDEO GAME
System. Comes with 11 games and
storage box! 2 controllers. 669-2243
696 WANTED TO BUY
RECENT VETERAN looking for antique
firearms (military, percussion, flintlock,
lever or bolt action) Also, old military
items, Civil War to present (helmets,
knives, uniforms, medals, photos,
anything!)
Call Phil 920-248-6495
TOP PRICES Any Scrap Metal
Cars/Batteries/Farm Equipment
Free appliance pick up
Property clean out. Honest
Fully insured. U call/We haul.
608-444-5496
WE BUY Junk Cars and Trucks.
We sell used parts.
Monday thru Friday 8am-5:30pm.
Newville Auto Salvage, 279 Hwy 59
Edgerton, 608-884-3114
WILL BUY Standing Timber/Wooded 40
acres or more. Northern WI or Upper MI.
Highest prices paid. Close in 30 days.
Send to: PO Box 544, Rhinelander, WI
54501 (wcan)
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS Noon
Friday for The Great Dane and Noon
Monday for The Courier Hub unless
changed because of holiday work sched-
ules. Call now to place your ad, 873-6671
or 835-6677.
705 RENTALS
GREENWOOD APARTMENTS Apart-
ments for Seniors 55+, currently has 1
& 2 Bedroom Units available starting at
$695 per month, includes heat, water,
and sewer. 608-835-6717 Located at 139
Wolf St., Oregon, WI 53575
OREGON 1-BEDROOM Apartment.
2-Car garage. $650/month. No pets.
Jane 608-271-7071
OREGON 2-Bedroom in quiet well kept
building. Convenient location. Includes
all appliances, A/C, blinds, private park-
ing, laundry and storage. $200 Security
deposit. Cats OK. $665/month. 608-219-
6677
OREGON- MAIN Street. 2 bedroom with
utilities, hardwood, tile. Sunny spacious
upper Victorian apt. Newly renovated,
washer, dryer in unit, fenced yard, gar-
den space. Pets OK. $820. per month.
608-332-1201
RURAL STOUGHTON- Mother N' Law
Apt. Suitable for 1 person Appliances-
wash-dryer. All Utilities Included. 608-
873-5983
STOUGHTON 211 E Main, 490sqft
efficiency, appliances/utilities included.
A/C, parking, decks. $550/mo.
Available 5/1.
608-271-0101. www.hoserealty.com
STOUGHTON- 517 E Jefferson 2 bed-
room, Upper. $720 Utilities included Call
608-455-7100.
STOUGHTON/KENILWORTH- QUIET
2-bedroom, balcony, water. Private
Owner. No Pets. $750/mo. Available Mid
June-July/1 608-212-0829
720 APARTMENTS
OREGON-2 BDRM, 1 bath. Available
for spring/summer. Great central loca-
tion. On-site or in-unit laundry, patio,
dishwasher and A/C. $720-$730/month.
Call 255-7100 or www.stevebrownapts.
com/oregon
ROSEWOOD APARTMENTS for Seniors
55+, has 1 & 2 bedroom units available
starting at $695 per month. Includes
heat, water and sewer. Professionally
managed. 608-877-9388 Located at 300
Silverado Drive, Stoughton, WI 53589
740 HOUSES FOR RENT
STOUGHTON-3BDRM, 1.5 Bath, large
kitchen, spacious dining room, living
room. 3 season porch, all appliances
included, 1 car detached garage. Very
nice quiet neighborhood. $1195 w/$500
security deposit. Call 608-286-5282
750 STORAGE SPACES FOR RENT
ALL SEASONS SELF STORAGE
10X10 10X15 10X20 10X30
Security Lights-24/7 access
BRAND NEW
OREGON/BROOKLYN
Credit Cards Accepted
CALL (608)444-2900
C.N.R. STORAGE
Located behind
Stoughton Garden Center
Convenient Dry Secure
Lighted with access 24/7
Bank Cards Accepted
Off North Hwy 51 on
Oak Opening Dr. behind
Stoughton Garden Center
Call: 608-509-8904
DEER POINT STORAGE
Convenient location behind
Stoughton Lumber.
Clean-Dry Units
24 HOUR LIGHTED ACCESS
5x10 thru 12x25
608-335-3337

FRENCHTOWN
SELF-STORAGE
Only 6 miles South of
Verona on Hwy PB.
Variety of sizes available now.
10x10=$50/month
10x15=$55/month
10x20=$70/month
10x25=$80/month
12x30=$105/month
Call 608-424-6530 or
1-888-878-4244
NORTH PARK STORAGE
10x10 through 10x40, plus
14x40 with 14' door for
RV & Boats.
Come & go as you please.
608-873-5088
OREGON SELF-STORAGE
10x10 through 10x25
month to month lease
Call Karen Everson at
608-835-7031 or
Veronica Matt at 608-291-0316
RASCHEIN PROPERTY
STORAGE
6x10 thru 10x25
Market Street/Burr Oak Street
in Oregon
Call 608-206-2347
STOUGHTON
307 S Forrest
Retail or
Offce Space.
400 sq ft.
$299/month
utilities
included.
608-271-0101
Increase Your sales opportunities
reach over 1.2 million households!
Advertise in our
Wisconsin Advertising Network System.
For information call 845-9559 or 873-6671.
ENTERTAINMENT AND EVENTS
TOMAHAWK MAIN STREET MEMORIES 20th
Annual CAR SHOW SUNDAY, MAY 25 DOWNTOWN
TOMAHAWK, Wisconsin. MOTORCYCLE SHOW/
SWAP MEET SATURDAY, MAY 24 NOON5pm. FREE
ADMISSION! www.tomahawkmainstreet.org (CNOW)
HEALTH AND BEAUTY
IF YOU USED THE BLOOD THINNER PRADAXA and
suffered internal bleeding, hemorrhaging, required
hospitalization or a loved one died while taking Pradaxa
between October 2010 and the present. You may be
entitled to compensation. Call Attorney Charles H.
Johnson 1-800-535-5727 (CNOW)
HELP WANTED- MANAGERIAL
LARSEN COOPERATIVE, NEW London Wisconsin
is seeking a qualified General Manager. This is a CHS
Country Operations cooperative with multiple grain
locations , full service agronomy, retail and bulk energy
operation, feed manufacturing and retail stores with sales
of $200 million with twelve locations. Grain, agronomy,
energy, feed, retail as well as financial and personal
management experience is preferred. Email: larry.fuller@
chsinc.com or fax (888-653-5527) resume to: Larry
Fuller, 5213 Shoal Drive, Bismarck ND 58503. (CNOW)
HELP WANTED- SKILLED TRADES
FOREMEN to lead utility field crews. Outdoor physical
work, many positions, paid training, $20/hr. plus weekly
performance bonuses after promotion, living allowance
when traveling, company truck and benefits. Must have
strong leadership skills, good driving history, and be
able to travel in Michigan and nearby States. Email
resume to Recruiter6@osmose.com or apply online at
www.OsmoseUtilities.com EOE M/F/D/V (CNOW)
HELP WANTED- TRUCK DRIVER
Drivers-CDL-A Train and work for us! Professional,
focused CDL training available. Choose Company Driver,
Owner Operator, Lease Operator or Lease Trainer. (877)
369-7893 www.CentralTruckDrivingJobs.com (CNOW)
Knight Refrigerated CDL-A Truck Drivers Needed. Get
Paid Daily or Weekly. Consistent Miles. Pay Incentive &
Benefits! Become a Knight of the Road. EOE. 855-876-
6079. (CNOW)
MISCELLANEOUS
This classified spot for sale! Advertise your product or
recruit an applicant in over 179 Wisconsin newspapers!
Only $300/week. Call this paper or 800-227-7636 www.
cnaads.com (CNOW)
Weve recently launched the option to
renew your newspaper subscription
electronically with our secure site at:
connectstoughton.com
Easily
renew your
subscription
online!
May 8, 2014 Courier Hub ConnectStoughton.com
23
STORAGE MOTORHOMES
RV's, Autos, Boats
Climate Controlled Space
608-575-5173

UNION ROAD STORAGE
10x10 - 10x15
10x20 - 12x30
24 / 7 Access
Security Lights & Cameras
Credit Cards Accepted
608-835-0082
1128 Union Road
Oregon, WI
Located on the corner of
Union Road & Lincoln Road
801 OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT
STOUGHTON 307 S Forrest Retail or
Office Space. 400 sq ft. $299/month utili-
ties included. 608-271-0101
STOUGHTON 316 S Gjertson St. Office/
Retail space. 1200 sq ft. $850/month,
utilities included. Will build to suit. Private
customer parking. 608-843-9125
VERONA- OFFICE/WAREHOUSE
1000 Sq Ft.$500 +Utilities.
608-575-2211 or
608-845-2052
810 COMMERCIAL &
INDUSTRIAL FOR SALE
STOUGHTON- 2558 Cty Trk N. Approx
3 Acres. 2 Bldgs ( total 9640 sq ft incl
offices) Lots of blacktop parking 608-
332-8203
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS Noon
Friday for The Great Dane and Noon
Monday for the Courier Hub unless
changed because of holiday work
schedules. Call now to place your ad,
873-6671 or 835-6677.
840 CONDOS &
TOWNHOUSES FOR SALE
6924 TOTTENHAM Rd Madison
Beautiful 2 bdrm, 1.5 bath condo w/2 car
garage, fireplace, convenient to West
Towne & Epic, $139,900 OPEN Sunday
1-4 (or by appt)
608-273-2515
965 HAY, STRAW & PASTURE
GRASSY HORSE Hay. Small squares
$4.50/ea. Alfalfa mix. Big squares.
Delivery available.
608-669-7879
970 HORSES
WALMERS TACK SHOP
16379 W. Milbrandt Road
Evansville, WI
608-882-5725
975 LIVESTOCK
REGISTERED BLACK ANGUS.
Yearling bulls. Semen tested, docile,
great EPD's. Also wrapped hay bales.
2nd/3rd crop. 608-655-3370
CLASSIFIEDS, 873-6671 or 835-6677. It
pays to read the fine print.
990 FARM: SERVICE
& MERCHANDISE
RENT SKIDLOADERS
MINI-EXCAVATORS
TELE-HANDLER
and these attachments. Concrete
breaker, posthole auger, landscape rake,
concrete bucket, pallet forks, trencher,
rock hound, broom, teleboom, stump
grinder.
By the day, week, or month.
Carter & Gruenewald Co.
4417 Hwy 92
Brooklyn, WI, 608-455-2411
995 FARM: WANTED TO BUY
BUYING STANDING WALNUT
Prices are High - Great time to Sell!
608-513-8678
Now hiring for PM and night shifts at our beautiful senior
living residence on Madisons west side. Shift and
weekend differentials, paid training and an array of
benefits available.
Resident Caregivers/CNAs
8210 Highview Drive - Madison
608.243.8800
to request an
application:
to download
an application:
allsaintsneighborhood.org
Now hiring for PM and night shifts at our beautiful senior
living residence on Madisons west side. Shift and
weekend differentials, paid training and an array of
benefits available.
Resident Caregivers/CNAs
8210 Highview Drive - Madison 608.243.8800
to request an
application:
to download
an application:
allsaintsneighborhood.org
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CITY OF STOUGHTON
DIRECTOR OF EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES
The City of Stoughton has an opening for a full time Director of Emergency
Medical Services.
This position directs the EMS program including operations, quality control,
budget development and long-term capital expenditure. Administers
processing of ambulance billings; supervises daily operations of the
EMS; represents city and participating townships at state, county and
governmental levels; directs and monitors EMS squads; develops &
maintains standards for service level of care mandated by state & county
regulations; develops and implements regulations and policies. Requires
EMT-Basic IV-Tech certication with ve years EMT experience. Supervisory
and budget development experience preferred or any combination of
education and experience. The salary for this position is $61,000/annual.
Employment applications and position descriptions are available online at
www.ci.stoughton.wi.us under Employment Opportunities. Please return a
cover letter, application and resume to the Ofce of the City of Stoughton,
Human Resources Dept., 381 East Main Street, Stoughton, WI 53589, by no
later than May 22, 2014.
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Attention College Students
and 2014 HS Grads!
Summer Work,
$17 base-appt, FT/PT
customer sales/service,
no exp nec, conditions apply,
all ages 17+, call now for
interview 608-662-2092
or apply online at
www.SummerWorkNow.com

Part Time Teller
We are currently offering an excellent part-time
opportunity within a professional environment
for individuals who enjoy serving customers
and believe the customers bank experience
should be a positive one. Previous teller
experience preferred.
Responsibilities include: Daily processing of
customer transactions, cross-selling and
providing information on bank products and
services. This position requires prior cash
handlingexperience.
If you possess a great attitude, enjoy serving
customers, are well organized, detail oriented
and thrive on a variety of tasks, this position is
for you. Computer proficiency is a plus!
Flexible schedule(s) possible. This is a great
opportunity for those attending post high
school educational institutions and working.
Although our tellers may, on occasion, float
between locations, this part-time teller position
is based out of our McFarland location.
Please submit your resume and/or
completed job application to:
McFarland State Bank
Attn: Shelley Edgington, VP Retail Banking
P.O. Box 7, McFarland, WI 53558
or e-mail sedgington@msbonline.com.
McFarland State Bank is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer.
Concrete Finishers
and Laborers
Experienced w/valid DL.
CDL preferred.
Competitive wage and benets.
Call Jeff: 608-884-9725.
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CUSTODIAN
The custodian position will maintain a clean and safe working en-
vironment for all staff and visitors. Responsibilities include general
handyman tasks; mop/vacuum oors; dust xtures; clean/sanitize
bathrooms; empty trash; maintain outside walk areas; shovel snow
as needed; light landscape maintenance.
Requirements include: Self-motivation; Ability to work independent-
ly; Good communication skills; Ability to lift 45 pounds; Walk/stand
75% of time. High School diploma/GED equivalent and 1 year of
custodial experience are required.
Apply by emailing resume to:
hr@nelsongp.com or
by sending your resum to
Nelson Global Products Attn: HR
at 1560 Williams Dr. Stoughton, WI 53589
EOE/Minorities/Female/Vet/Disability
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Award/Trophy Builder
Full-time start immediately. Seeking
individual with experience in computer
engraving and trophy assembly.
Call for appointment
835-5791 or 276-6050
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** DRIVERS **
FULL TIME DRIVERS NEEDED FOR REGIONAL WORK
$1000 SIGN ON BONUS
$1000 RETENTION BONUS
$750 GUARANTEE WEEKLY
Tractor-trailer drivers needed for the Walgreens Private
Fleet Operation based in Windsor, WI. Drivers make hand
deliveries to Walgreens stores within a regional area (WI,
IL, IA, MN, ND, SD). Workweek is Tues ~ Sat. All drivers
must be willing & able to unload freight.
*Earn $21.90/hour (OT after 8 hours) or $0.4650/mile
* Full Benet Pkg includes Life, Dental, Disability & Health
Insurance with Prescription Card
*401k Pension Program with Company Contribution
*Paid Holidays & Vacation
*Home every day except for occasional layover
Drivers must be over 24 years old, have a min 18 months
T/T exp or 6 months T/T exp with a certicate from an from
an accredited driving school & meet all DOT requirements
Send resume to:
b.kriel@callcpc.com
or call CPC Logistics at 1-800-914-3755
CDL DRIVERS
WANTED
Health Insurance / Vacation / 401K
Call (608) 275-7627
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Equal Opportunity Employer
www.qpsemployment.com
APPLY ONLINE TODAY AT:
Madison
608-819-4000
ASSEMBLERS
WELDERS
CHEESE PACKAGING
PRODUCTION
Monroe
608-325-4690
www.qpsemployment.com
APPLY ONLINE TODAY AT:
MATERIAL HANDLING
MACHINE OPERATING
PRODUCTION / GENERAL LABOR
MAINTENANCE
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24 - The Courier Hub - May 8, 2014
HOURS:
MONDAY-FRIDAY 8:30AM-7:30PM;
SATURDAY 8:30AM-6PM; SUNDAY 9AM-5PM
Visit the Stoughton Area Farmers Market
on Friday mornings in front of Dollar General
Quality Bloomers at
Reasonable Prices.
Come Visit Wisconsins
Premier Grower of
Quality Bedding Plants &
Hanging Baskets.
Congratulations to our
Grand Opening winners!
$200 Shelly Weber $100 Scott Wackett
$50 Connie Pykstra $50 Leo Sweeney
Support Local Agriculture. Shop Outside the Box Stores!
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CTY. M
Directions from Stoughton:
Take 138 toward Oregon. Go past Eugsters
Farm Market, one mile and turn right on
Sunrise Rd. Go one more mile then turn left
on Town Line Rd. Continue on to Sand Hill Rd.
(approximately one mile) and turn right.
Directions from Fitchburg:
Take Fish Hatchery Road south to Nether-
wood Road. Turn left and go through Oregon
past Walgreens to a left on Sand Hill Road.
Directions from Verona:
Take Cty. M to Fish Hatchery Rd. Turn right
and go to Netherwood Road. Turn left at
Netherwood Rd. through Oregon past Wal-
greens to a left on Sand Hill Rd.
H
1828 Sandhill Rd. Oregon, WI 608-835-7569
When in Stoughton, visit our sales house located
in the Main Street Plaza parking lot
Koupons & sale prices honored at both locations
KIDS KOUPON
$
1
00
Off
Any Plant for Mom
At Kopkes with koupon. Limit one per koupon.
Limit 1 koupon per kid per day. Age 16 or under.
Valid 5/7/14 - 5/11/14.
MOTHERS DAY KOUPON
$
1
00
Off
Any Hanging Basket
At Kopkes with koupon. Limit one per koupon.
Limit 2 koupons per kustomer per day.
Valid 5/7/14 - 5/12/14.
MOTHERS DAY
GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE!
www.kopkesgreenhouse.com
U
N
2
7
9
5
5
2
PERENNIAL KOUPON
Save up to $3
50

Off
Perennials
At Kopkes with koupon. Limit 6 per koupon.
Limit 1 koupon per kustomer per day.
Valid 5/7/14 - 5/12/14.
MUMS FOR MOM SALE
4 Garden Mums
Reg. $3.99. This Week $2.99 ea.
Sale valid through Mothers Day