You are on page 1of 78

Sponsored by Walton & Parkinson Ltd, insurance brokers to the theatre industry.

Tel: 0845 218 4140. Email: enquiry@waltonandparkinson.co.uk.


So, you wanna be a Producer?! i. (Page 1 of 2)

STARTING OUT AND USING THIS GUIDE
An Introduction by Nick Salmon


Welcome to our Guide, the purpose of which is to provide first time producers with an
introduction to the basic skills they will need to produce a play on a commercial basis. By
the nature of the business of producing plays, each of which is unique, this Guide cannot
be comprehensive, but we hope it will start new producers on the right track and give an
introduction to the basic skills needed to produce commercially. The various key points in
the individual contributions are intended as a guide and an aide memoire. You will not
necessarily achieve all of them on every production, but do try to achieve the best terms
possible and if in doubt, take advice.

Producing plays commercially has become ever more difficult and complex. The risks
involved in producing plays have always been very high, but recently we have seen the
rewards and returns dwindling. This has led to producers having to be ever more
inventive and creative in the ways they set up and launch their productions in order to
ensure that the costs are kept at a level at which a reasonable return can be made to
investors, provided the production plays to sufficiently high box office receipts.

As costs inevitably continue their upward spiral, producers have resorted to more and
more co-productions with other commercial producers and with subsidised producing
companies. The latter has enormous benefits both for the commercial producer, who will
mount his/her production at a considerable saving, and for the subsidised company who
will be able to present a play which it might not otherwise be able to afford, possibly with
star names, and from which it can earn from its future exploitation.

It is not only rising costs that todays commercial producer has to cope with, but also the
fact that plays are often playing for shorter runs in the West End and on tour. Star actors
will not always commit for long runs, and often producers are finding that the audience
for a particular production is all too limited; this makes it difficult to recover the initial
investment quickly and still make a good return in the often all too short time available.

In addition to these pressures on profits, a producer also now has to cope with ever
more red tape and bureaucracy. The Financial Services and Markets Act makes it difficult
to raise money. Employment legislation, health and safety, EU legislation, ever longer
and more complicated contracts and many other factors make the producers job more
and more complex.

I hope this Guide will act as an aid in assisting new producers, not only in providing some
basic information, but also in helping with the presentation of new productions that will
have every chance of making large profits. Before embarking in your first production
consider the following:

Sponsored by Walton & Parkinson Ltd, insurance brokers to the theatre industry.
Tel: 0845 218 4140. Email: enquiry@waltonandparkinson.co.uk.

So, you wanna be a Producer?! i. (Page 2 of 2)

STARTING OUT AND USING THIS GUIDE
by Nick Salmon



1. Do not attempt to produce a musical as your first production. The Guide contains
many references to and details about musical production in order to be as
comprehensive as possible but, in view of their complexity and costs, a new
producer would be foolhardy to attempt a musical as a first production.

2. Always ask for and listen to advice from established producers. It is never too
early to come to Stage One for advice and we are available as a free resource.

3. Work out your figures very carefully and assess the risk you are taking. No one
has to produce a play! If the costs are too high or the risk too great, dont do it!
- or find another way of presenting it. If you want to make a living as a
commercial producer you must make business decisions as well as artistic ones.

4. Persevere - it is not easy to produce plays. Although you can benefit from the
experience of others, do try to find new ways of presenting plays that will make
money.

Finally, I would like to thank all the contributors to this Guide for their very valuable
input. They are all leading professionals in their fields and have very kindly
contributed to this Guide because they are keen to help newcomers start in the
Industry.

All of the contributors would be very interested in your comments (good or bad) on
the Guide. It will only continue to be of value and improve if those using it tell us
what is missing or not clear.

Good luck for your first production and for many more thereafter.







Nick Salmon
Chief Executive, Stage One




For further information about Stage One see Section 5.


Nick Salmon
Sponsored by Walton & Parkinson Ltd, leading insurance brokers to the theatre industry.
Tel: 0845 218 4140. Email: enquiry@waltonandparkinson.co.uk.

So, you wanna be a Producer?! ii (Page 1 of 1)

AN INTRODUCTION TO COMMERCIAL
PRODUCING
by Paul Elliott


So!... You want to be a producer?... Then welcome to a brave body of people who
want to create that magical hit for which audiences will walk over hot coals and
climb up greasy poles to buy tickets.

Being a producer is not rocket science but it requires many talents coming
together and the Stage One Guide will we hope give you the practical guidance on
how to realise that dream.

There are many highs and lows in the journey of a producer I know Ive survived
40 years! Never get too arrogant when you have a hit and dont get too suicidal
when you have a flop. A producers life is one of survival and tenacity its a
marathon not a sprint!

When you have in your hand the script that you are convinced is the one then find
the team to make it happen. The director you are sure you can work with the
designer who understands your budget its your team you are the captain the
leader the psychologist!... And you will have to work harder than all of them put
together and have that other strange component of success luck!
Remember when you have raised the money (and the producers motto)
1) never use your own money
2) never use your own money!!
Then your investors become your partners its their show too so keep them in
the picture all the time even when the news is bad! Look after your investors and
they will look after you.

No-one actually knows how this wonderful business works!.. There is no perfect
solution to any problem just use your instinct and flair and with hard work and
luck you will enjoy success.

Stage One is here to help and encourage young producers I hope you will be one
of them good luck have fun read on!




Paul Elliott
Vice-Chair, Stage One



1
Paul Elliott
Sponsored by Walton & Parkinson Ltd, insurance brokers to the theatre industry.
Tel: 0845 218 4140. Email: enquiry@waltonandparkinson.co.uk.

So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 1.1 (Page 1 of 8)

A THEATRE PRODUCER'S GLOSSARY

Note: This glossary gives what are considered to be the usual meanings of the words
and expressions concerned which are most commonly intended. It does not
mean that they may not be differently defined for contractual purposes.

Advance

An advance against payment for future services or future use of
copyright material. Frequently (but not necessarily) expressed as "non-
returnable" and as "recoupable" in whole or in part from royalties or a
portion of royalties. Advances are often paid to authors/composers for
an "option" on their work and to directors and designers for their
services to a production. The word "advance" may also be used to
describe advance ticket-sales.


Angels

Investors in a theatrical production. Usually referable to private
individuals but can be used to include corporate investors as well.


Box Office

In its narrow sense refers just to the kiosk in the theatre-lobby where
members of the public can buy tickets, but in a wider sense can be used
to refer to the whole ticket retailing system which is usually controlled by
the theatre management. Can also be used to refer to advance ticket
sales, as in "How big is the box office?" meaning "How much have you
made in advance ticket sales?"


Break Even

The point at which weekly box office receipts (net of commissions and
VAT) exactly equal running expenses so that there is neither a running
surplus nor a running deficit.


Break Figure

The level of weekly Box Office Receipts below which notice of
termination of a theatre hire agreement may be given by one party
and/or the other. Sometimes also referred to as the Notice Figure or
Take Off Figure. Not to be confused with break even (see above).


Broadway

Loosely means, in a theatrical context, the Broadway district of
Manhattan in New York City and not just the street known as
"Broadway". Sometimes, contractually, it is defined by reference to
theatres of a particular size in a particular area bounded by specified
streets in downtown Manhattan.


Bus and Truck
Performances

An American expression which can also apply elsewhere relating to
touring productions which transport the entire stage company and
physical assets from place to place, presenting a small number of
performances at each venue before moving on. In America (and
sometimes elsewhere) they are often presented for a fixed fee (which
forms the basis for calculation of royalties instead of box office receipts).
D Michael Rose
Sponsored by Walton & Parkinson Ltd, insurance brokers to the theatre industry.
Tel: 0845 218 4140. Email: enquiry@waltonandparkinson.co.uk.

So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 1.1 (Page 2 of 8)

A THEATRE PRODUCER'S GLOSSARY


Capitalisation

The estimated (as distinct from actual) cost of preparing a production up
to the time of first paid public performance, as per producer's budget,
including deposits and a reasonable contingency reserve.


Cast Album

A sound recording of the songs in a musical show featuring the cast or
principal members of the cast of a particular production or productions.


Commercial Usage

Same as merchandising but related to services, rather than merchandise,
but the expression may be used instead of merchandising to include
both goods and services. May also be applied to sponsorship
arrangements and use of show logo for commercial advertising or
promotion.


Copyright

The exclusive legal property right to copy, perform, broadcast and/or
adapt an original literary, dramatic, musical and/or artistic work, and/or
a sound recording, film, programme or typographical arrangement.
Governed by The Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988 (which
amended and consolidated prior legislation) and regulations made
thereunder.

Copyright under English law is divisible both territorially and between
media, and (unless otherwise agreed) may be licensed, sub-licensed
and/or assigned.


Creative Team

The director, choreographer, stage-sets designer, costume and wigs
designer, lighting designer, sound designer and orchestrator of a stage
musical (i.e. the creative personnel who are usually remunerated with a
copyright royalty). In the case of a non-musical play includes only the
director and the designers of sets and props, costumes and wigs,
lighting and sound.


Design Right


The exclusive legal property right (accorded by The Copyright, Designs
and Patents Act 1988) to reproduce for commercial purposes the original
design of the shape or configuration of the whole or part of a three-
dimensional object (not mere surface decoration).


Development
Charge/
Development Royalty

An additional charge which is sometimes made to the production costs
of a major production in order to recoup losses from a previous "try-out"
or a "workshop" production, in order to reflect the contribution of the
"try-out" or "workshop" production to the development of the major
production and the reputation of the work. Sometimes, instead of a
carry forward of try-out losses, a small development royalty may be
payable to the theatre management where the "try-out" or "workshop"
was presented in recognition of some special financial contribution or
indulgence by that theatre management.
Sponsored by Walton & Parkinson Ltd, insurance brokers to the theatre industry.
Tel: 0845 218 4140. Email: enquiry@waltonandparkinson.co.uk.

D Michael Rose
Sponsored by Walton & Parkinson Ltd, insurance brokers to the theatre industry.
Tel: 0845 218 4140. Email: enquiry@waltonandparkinson.co.uk.

So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 1.1 (Page 3 of 8)

A THEATRE PRODUCERS GLOSSARY


DGA Agreement
(APC Agreement)

Sometimes also referred to as the "APC Agreement" (Approved
Production Contract) or "Dramatists' Guild Agreement". Refers to the
standard form of production contract for plays (or the separate one for
musical plays) of the Dramatists Guild Inc of America. It is a very
detailed printed document running to over 45 pages promulgated by the
Dramatists Guild Inc of America as a form of agreement which it has
recommended to its members as being fair and reasonable to both
authors and producers. It is frequently adopted (often with supplements
and amendments) by authors/producers in the United States, US
territories and Canada, but rarely if ever (doubtless because of its
complexity and unfamiliarity) in relation to productions outside those
territories. It is a useful reference work as to the custom and practice on
the North American continent.


Electronic Rights


The right to reproduce a work on multimedia/CD ROM/internet or other
means of computer transmission. Also referred to as "multimedia
rights".


First Class Stage
Rights

The right to present first class live stage performances of a work. There
is no standard definition of "first class" but it is usually determined by
reference to the size, location and reputation of the theatre, the use of
professional performers and an experienced professional creative team,
possibly the size of the budget and/or the standard of stage scenery and
costumes, the length of anticipated production run and other such
factors.


Fixer


A colloquial expression for the orchestral manager, who is responsible for
engaging and fixing remuneration of the theatre orchestra on behalf of
the producer (see Section 2.6.3).


Get-In, Fit-Up and
Get-Out

As these expressions themselves indicate, they apply to the process of
getting the stage scenery, props, costumes, sound and lighting
equipment etc into the theatre; the assembly, positioning and fitting up
of same in the theatre; and, after eventual closure, the process of
removing all these items from the theatre, cleaning up and getting out of
the theatre so as to leave it as it was before get-in.


Grand Rights

The performing rights in a dramatico-musical work.


Hold-Backs

Arrangements whereby authors and other copyright owners agree to
"hold-back" on releasing certain reserved rights for a specified period
whilst the grantee of other rights is exploiting those other rights. An
example would be for an author to agree not to release amateur
performance rights or motion picture rights without the producer's
consent whilst the producer has the right to present professional
performances, or not to release music publishing rights before the
producer has put out a cast album.
D Michael Rose
Sponsored by Walton & Parkinson Ltd, insurance brokers to the theatre industry.
Tel: 0845 218 4140. Email: enquiry@waltonandparkinson.co.uk.

So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 1.1 (Page 4 of 8)

A THEATRE PRODUCERS GLOSSARY


House Seats

An allocation of seats for each performance at the theatre which, by
arrangement between producer and theatre manager, are specially
reserved for disposal by the producer to persons connected with the
show, and friends and associates. House seats are usually released to
the box office for sale, if not disposed of by or under permission of the
producer at least 48 hours before each performance. The producer may
put one or two pairs of house seats for each performance at the disposal
of favoured individuals, such as author, composer, and possibly certain
privileged members of the creative team. It is usual to require all house
seats to be paid for at regular box office prices even if used by the
producer himself, so that royalty holders and investors are not
disadvantaged.


Library Agent

An appointed agent for the sale of theatre tickets who is allocated a
block of tickets for a specified booking period, sometimes on credit
terms or on sale or return, and who is not required like other retailers to
purchase tickets for cash over the counter or otherwise on an ad hoc
basis.


Merchandising

The marketing of merchandise, featuring the title and/or logo and/or
artwork and/or characters of a show in order to enhance the sale of such
merchandise e.g. on tee shirts, coffee mugs, ashtrays, stationery etc.


Moral Rights

These comprise
(i) the right of an author not to have his/her work subjected to
derogatory treatment which may damage his/her reputation;
(ii) the right of an author to accreditation (if asserted);
(iii) the right not to be falsely accredited as author of someone else's
work and
(iv) the right to privacy in respect of certain photographs and films
made for private and domestic purposes.
Only the author has moral rights which cannot be assigned but may be
waived. Moral rights were introduced into English law in 1988, but have
been established on the continent in one form or another for many
years. Moral rights differ from and do not pass with copyright.


Motion Picture

An all-embracing expression covering audio-visual exploitation of a work
by any or all of cinematograph exhibition, television, (including cable and
satellite), and/or videogram. May also be used to include electronic
rights i.e. multi media/CD ROM/internet.


Music Publishing
Rights

In a theatrical context music publishing rights are usually reserved to
author/composer when granting the right to a producer to present a
stage musical. In this context, "music publishing" can be contractually
defined according to taste but is usually confined to:
D Michael Rose
Sponsored by Walton & Parkinson Ltd, insurance brokers to the theatre industry.
Tel: 0845 218 4140. Email: enquiry@waltonandparkinson.co.uk.

So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 1.1 (Page 5 of 8)

A THEATRE PRODUCER'S GLOSSARY


Music Publishing
Rights
Cont ......

(i) sound recordings of individual songs from the show in a non-dramatic
context;
(ii) synchronisation of musical compositions from the show with the
sound track of a motion picture;
(iii) publication of printed sheet music and
(iv) non-dramatic "small performing rights" in individual songs of the kind
administered by collection societies such as the PRS. (See "small
rights").


Opening Night

Sometimes called "press night". The first paid public performance after
the end of "previews", being the performance to which the press is
invited, which will form the basis of theatre critics' first night press
reviews. Tickets are usually by invitation only and many are
complimentary.


Overcall

A contractual obligation on investors in a production to top up their
original investment by a specified percentage or specified amount, in the
event that the producer's budget on which s/he has based the
capitalisation of the show turns out to be an underestimate so that
additional capital is required. Some investment contracts contain
provision for an overcall and some do not. It is obviously desirable to
avoid an overcall requirement wherever practicable since it is a
discouragement to investors if they are under an obligation to top up their
original subscription.


Per Diems

Fixed amounts payable to certain individuals, such as authors, composers
and production personnel to cover their daily subsistence expenses such
as meals, transport etc whilst working away from the place where they
live.


Previews

Public performances, sometimes purchased by charities, prior to the
official opening (press night), during which performances are still being
tested against audience reaction with a view to making any last minute
changes which may be considered to be desirable.


Production Costs

The actual capital cost of preparing a production up to the time of first
paid public performance (including a reasonable "contingency reserve").
Note that the word "costs" is interchangeable with "expenses".


Production Schedule

A timetable for preparing a production ready for opening, including dates
for matters such as casting auditions, completion of designs, completion
of costumes, stage sets and properties, advertising launch, box office
opening, commencement of rehearsals, dress rehearsal, "get - in" to
theatre, first preview and opening night.
Sponsored by Walton & Parkinson Ltd, insurance brokers to the theatre industry.
Tel: 0845 218 4140. Email: enquiry@waltonandparkinson.co.uk.

D Michael Rose
Sponsored by Walton & Parkinson Ltd, insurance brokers to the theatre industry.
Tel: 0845 218 4140. Email: enquiry@waltonandparkinson.co.uk.

So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 1.1 (Page 6 of 8)

A THEATRE PRODUCERS GLOSSARY


Qualifying Period

A specified number of consecutive performances (usually 21) within a
specified option period, as a criterion for a producer to "qualify" for
continuing stage rights and/or for subsidiary exploitation rights in other
media to which s/he may become entitled. Sometimes also used as the
yardstick for "merger" of rights, namely the merger of different strands
of copyright material into a composite whole in order to preclude
separate copyright exploitation of the component parts.


Recoupment

The point at which all "production costs" (i.e. the capital cost of
mounting a production up to opening) have been recouped" out of the
surplus of box office revenue over running expenses.

It follows that "double" or "125%" or "150%" recoupment is the point at
which double or 125% or 150% (as the case may be) of "production
costs" have been "recouped" out of the surplus of box office revenue
over running expenses.


Repertory
Performances

Performances by a so-called "resident or semi-resident" stage company
under the same management as part of a repertoire of a number of
works pre-programmed for a fixed season at a fixed venue or venues.


Reproduction

A mirror-image recreation (as nearly as circumstances permit) of another
production of a particular work including the recreation of the stage
directions, designs and other production elements of the original
production.


Royalty

Strictly means remuneration for the use of copyright material. Usually
expressed as a percentage of box office receipts or other revenue but
may be a "fixed" royalty e.g. a fixed sum per performance.


Royalty Cap

A limit on the amount of weekly box office receipts on which royalties
are calculated (usually prior to Recoupment only), the excess being
sometimes referred to as "exempt" box office receipts and sometimes
merely being deferred so as to cut back in at a later stage of
profitability. See comments under definition of "Royalty Pool", the
purpose and effect of which is very much the same.


Royalty Pool

Applies where an aggregate royalty is fixed for all or a specified class of
royalty participants, to be shared between them in specified proportions
(usually pro rata to their full royalties) instead of full royalties. As in the
case of a royalty cap or deferral the purpose is to accelerate
recoupment,
D Michael Rose
Sponsored by Walton & Parkinson Ltd, insurance brokers to the theatre industry.
Tel: 0845 218 4140. Email: enquiry@waltonandparkinson.co.uk.

So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 1.1 (Page 7 of 8)

A THEATRE PRODUCER'S GLOSSARY


Royalty Pool Cont ....

or to delay closure of a production where it would not otherwise be
financially viable to continue, or to enable a production to be presented
where it would not otherwise be viable to present it. Sometimes the
amount surrendered by a royalty pool is merely deferred and made to
cut back in if and when the production reaches a specified level of
profitability. The effect of the pool is to spread the risk more evenly
between the producer, investors and royalty participants.


Running Expenses

The weekly running expenses from the time of the first paid public
performance (including producer's royalty and office management fees).
Again, the word "costs" is interchangeable with the word "expenses".
Sometimes also called "operating costs" or "operating expenses".


Second Class [Stage]
Rights

The right to present amateur, stock, repertory, condensed, tabloid
and/or concert version performances of a work, and includes anything
else not regarded as "first class.


Small Rights


The right to present short live performances of individual musical
compositions from a dramatico-musical work, in a non-dramatic fashion
(i.e. without dramatic staging, costume or mime) usually in accordance
with rules of collection societies such as the PRS (Performing Right
Society) which limit such non-dramatic performances to not more than
25 minutes and not more than 25% of the whole work.


Sponsorship Deal

An arrangement whereunder a non-returnable sum of money is
contributed to the revenue of a production in return for advertising or
publicity or promotional services or special privileges relating to the
production.


Stock Performances

Broadly speaking the American equivalent of repertory performances.
Technically means performances governed by US Equity's standard form
of contract for employment of actors in productions classified as stock,
resident theatre or dinner-theatre type performances.


Subsidiary Rights

Sometimes called "secondary" or "ancillary" or "residual" rights. The
right to exploit a work in other media or in other ways, apart from [first
class] live stage performances. Thus subsidiary rights may include any
or all of (i) motion picture rights (ii) electronic rights (iii) merchandising
and commercial usage (iv) cast album and also, possibly (v) second class
stage rights if not within the principal rights granted.

D Michael Rose
Sponsored by Walton & Parkinson Ltd, insurance brokers to the theatre industry.
Tel: 0845 218 4140. Email: enquiry@waltonandparkinson.co.uk.

So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 1.1 (Page 8 of 8)

A THEATRE PRODUCER'S GLOSSARY


Weekly Box Office
Receipts

Amounts received each week from the sale of tickets for performances
after deducting VAT, credit card and agency commissions and certain
other specified standard deductions of a similar nature in accordance
with local theatrical practice in the territory concerned. Royalties will
often be expressed as a percentage of the box office receipts. WBOR
usually form the basis for calculation of royalties and are the principal
source of production revenue.


West End

In a theatrical context reference to a production being presented in "the
West End of London" is usually intended to mean presentation at a
theatre which is a member of SOLT (Society of London Theatre)
comprising major theatres in and around the West End of London (see
Section 2.1).


Withholding Tax

A tax which is required by law to be withheld from payment of royalties
or fees to overseas investors or service providers, unless special
exemption is obtained from the Inland Revenue. A producer who fails to
withhold tax on payments to overseas residents in circumstances where
required to do so will be responsible for paying that tax to the Inland
Revenue or other local tax authority, whether s/he gets it back from the
payee or not.



























Sponsored by Walton & Parkinson Ltd, insurance brokers to the theatre industry.
Tel: 0845 218 4140. Email: enquiry@waltonandparkinson.co.uk.

So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 1.2 (Page 1 of 3)

SETTING UP A PRODUCTION
The Role of the Producer


The role of the producer is manifold and diverse. In effect s/he will be responsible for making
arrangements for every aspect of the production in order to prepare it for presentation to the public
on stage, subsequently managing it during the course of its production run and finally making all
necessary closure arrangements. Thus his/her many functions will include:-


1.

Acquiring the rights in the basic work from author, composer, collaborators, translators
(if any), and owner of any underlying rights e.g. in a film or novel from which a play or
musical is being adapted.


2.

Engaging and commissioning any original or new writers to finish an uncompleted work
or revise one which is supposedly completed but is in need of a re-write, and acquiring the
rights in their work.


3.

Finding and hiring a suitable theatre in a suitable location, possibly after a previous try-
out or workshop production.


4.

Putting together and engaging the creative team of director, choreographer, set
designer, costume designer, lighting designer, sound designer, and also orchestrator if no
acceptable orchestrations already exist. Also engaging a support team of their assistants,
supervisors and other production personnel where appropriate. Obviously in the case of a
non-musical play there will usually be no sound designer, orchestrator or sound engineer.


5.

Preparing a detailed budget relating to the estimated capital cost of mounting the
production and, separately, the weekly running expenses, with reasonable contingency
reserves. Also preparing projections as to the time it will take to reach recoupment and
break even at different levels of theatre capacity.


6.

Raising the money which may involve private finance from "angels" or loan capital or a
mixture of both and ensuring (on professional advice) compliance with Financial Services &
Markets Act 2000 regulations.


7.

Arranging the manufacture and purchase or hire of the physical assets of the production
i.e. the stage scenery and props, costumes and wigs, and any special equipment
required.


8.

Putting together and engaging the cast of performers and understudies which may
involve arranging and attending auditions. Also, in the case of a musical, engaging
musicians, conductor and musical director.
D Michael Rose
Sponsored by Walton & Parkinson Ltd, insurance brokers to the theatre industry.
Tel: 0845 218 4140. Email: enquiry@waltonandparkinson.co.uk.

So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 1.2 (Page 2 of 3)

SETTING UP A PRODUCTION
The Role of the Producer


9.

Preparing a production schedule i.e. timetable for various things to be started or
completed in readiness for scheduled opening.


10.

Dealing with advertising, publicity and promotion, both in advance of opening and
during the run of the production, which may involve the commissioning of special artwork
and logo from a graphic designer.


11.

Arranging with theatre management the opening of the box office for advance
bookings, discussing and approving ticket retailing arrangements with box office
management.


12.

Arranging with printers for posters and "flyers" and other printed material such as special
programme covers and "biogs" to go in the programme.


13.

Setting up special bank accounts for the production and retaining lawyers and
accountants as appropriate.


14.

Setting up internal accounts, admin systems and personnel for management of the
production.


15.

Arranging and holding rehearsals, including technical and dress rehearsals, band calls
and stage management.


16.

Opening night arrangements including the printing and issue of invitations to press,
celebrities, persons connected with the production etc; and arranging any opening night
party.


17.


Arranging with theatre manager and contractors for "get-in" and "fit-up" and, eventually,
for closure and "get-out".


18.

Arranging for disposal, scrap, storage or return to hirer of the sets and costumes after
closure.


19.

Arranging with accountants for preparation of interim and final production accounts
and royalty statements, distributions to investors, payment of royalties, salaries and
other expenses during the course of the production.

D Michael Rose
Sponsored by Walton & Parkinson Ltd, insurance brokers to the theatre industry.
Tel: 0845 218 4140. Email: enquiry@waltonandparkinson.co.uk.


SETTING UP A PRODUCTION
The Role of the Producer


20.

Arranging insurance cover and considering with brokers the level of cover and extent of
insured risks required to be covered.


21.

Maintaining close consultation with the creative team during preparation and rehearsals in
relation to artistic presentation, ensuring all elements are co-ordinated and everything
ready for opening.


22.

Arranging for "house seat" disposals and return to box office of any that are unused.


23.

Arranging special preview sales to charities, attending previews, and making any last
minute changes during the course of previews in light of audience reaction.


24.

Monitoring the performances from time to time during the run of the production to
ensure quality is maintained.


25.

Arranging for any subsidiary exploitation which may be appropriate, such as
merchandising, motion picture, second class licensing, cast album, subject to having
acquired the relevant rights.


26.

Negotiating contract terms of all the above, and liaison with lawyers where
appropriate.


27.

Generally sorting out the many unforeseen problems which inevitably arise in relation to
the above, and endeavouring to keep the stage company happy and working at their best.


28.

Winding up the production after closure, and accounting to all relevant parties.

D Michael Rose

Sponsored by Walton & Parkinson Ltd, insurance brokers to the theatre industry.
Tel: 0845 218 4140. Email: enquiry@waltonandparkinson.co.uk.

So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 1.3 (Page 1 of 5)

KEY POINTS TO CONSIDER WHEN COMMISSIONING
OR OPTIONING A NEW PLAY OR A NEW MUSICAL


General Comments

There is a collective bargaining Agreement, operating from June 1993
between TMA (1) and the Writer's Guild of Great Britain, The Theatre
Writer's Union and the Scottish Society of Playwrights (2) which sets out
minimum terms for contracts between their respective members (other
than English Stage Company, RNT and RSC) for plays in subsidised
repertory theatre throughout the UK (but excluding West End of
London). These minimum terms may be supplemented or enlarged by
agreement between the parties. Reference should be made to the TMA
booklet for these minimum terms in relation to subsidised repertory
productions outside West End of London.

Apart from the above subsidised repertory agreement and agreements
relating to the above National Companies, there is no standard form
agreement between producer and author, so that such agreements are
subject to negotiation in each case. Much will depend on individual
circumstances, including the relative bargaining strengths and
weaknesses of the parties. Each case is different and the scope for
variation is very wide. The following key points relate to "open"
contracts of this nature.

In the case of a new work which has never been previously presented
the producer will be helping to establish the reputation of the work and
bring it to life, so as to generate revenue from future exploitation.
Therefore, unless the author is a big name and possibly even then, the
producer should be able to negotiate a better financial package in
relation to subsidiary exploitation and/or continuing financial interest
after closure of his/her initial production, than would otherwise be the
case.


Applicable to Newly
Commissioned Works

Lump sum advance payable by instalments against delivery of first
draft, second draft, final version etc, according to a timetable.
Advance to be recoupable (or partially recoupable) from royalties.
Any permission needed from other authors to engage new writer?
Suggest that since it is a work-for-hire based on other partially
completed work, copyright in new material should be assigned
outright to producer, in all media in perpetuity without reverter,
upon payment of final instalment of the advance. If not assigned,
but only optioned or licensed, see separate section on non-
commissioned work below.
Query whether usual reservation of "music publishing rights" in
favour of the writer (applies to stage musicals only). Arguably, if
commissioned there should be no reservation.
Ensure no obligation on producer to use the new material.
Query waiver of writer's moral right to non-derogatory treatment, if
producer is to be able to use part of the new work, as distinct from
the whole, or to make any changes in it, or mingle it with that of
other writers, or have it translated into other languages.

D Michael Rose
Sponsored by Walton & Parkinson Ltd, insurance brokers to the theatre industry.
Tel: 0845 218 4140. Email: enquiry@waltonandparkinson.co.uk.

So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 1.3 (Page 2 of 5)

KEY POINTS TO CONSIDER WHEN COMMISSIONING
OR OPTIONING A NEW PLAY OR A NEW MUSICAL


Applicable to Option
on New Non-
Commissioned Work

Length of option.
Advance payment for option.
Is advance to be wholly or partially recoupable from royalties?
Is option period extendable by further advances? If so for how
long?
Scope of option:
Any territorial or other geographical restriction
on stage rights option e.g. West End, U.K,
overseas, fixed venue
Any classification restriction on stage rights
option
all professional?
first class only?
all live stage, including amateur?
If confined to first class, is workshop or try-out
permissible?
If confined to West End, is a pre-West End tour
permissible?

Qualifying period:
usually 21 consecutive performances (excluding
Sundays and public holidays) commencing
within option period.

Qualifies for:
widening scope of stage rights, territorially or
otherwise
acquiring subsidiary rights, and if so, what (see
below)
merger of different strands of the work into a
single whole so as not to be separately
exploitable.

Licence or Assignment after qualifying? Which?
If assignment, query any geographical or rights
limitation?
If licence:
Query perpetual?
Query exclusive?
Any reverter of stage rights and if so how
does licence lapse e.g. if less than [50]
performances p.a. after a specified period
following closure of initial production?
Cont ....
D Michael Rose
Sponsored by Walton & Parkinson Ltd, insurance brokers to the theatre industry.
Tel: 0845 218 4140. Email: enquiry@waltonandparkinson.co.uk.

So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 1.3 (Page 3 of 5)

KEY POINTS TO CONSIDER WHEN COMMISSIONING
OR OPTIONING A NEW PLAY OR A NEW MUSICAL


Applicable to Option
on New Non-
Commissioned Work

Query avoidance of lapse by payment
instead?
Any reverter of subsidiary rights? If so
when? and remember to reserve pre-
existing contracts.

Subsidiary Rights (subject to qualifying):
What subsidiaries is producer to have, if
any?
Merchandising?
In theatre only or general?
Motion Picture:
Cinema
TV
Video
Multimedia
As staged only or right to adapt?
Cartoon/animation rights?
Cast album (in case of stage musical only).
Second class stage rights? (Amateur, stock, repertory, concert).
Foreign language rights? Right to translate?
For how long are subsidiary rights to last? 20 years or perpetual, or
as long as stage rights?

If subsidiary rights (or stage rights) revert or are reserved, does
producer have share in authors or copyright owners subsequent
exploitation and if so what share (20%?) and for how long?

Sub-licensing:
Permissible generally?
Limited to affiliates?
Subject or not to approval?
Any approval not to be unreasonably
withheld?


Applicable to both
Newly Commissioned
and Non-
Commissioned works

Reserved rights:
What rights and/or territories does author
wish to reserve for him/herself?
In case of a musical, author will
invariably want to reserve music
publishing rights in individual songs.
General reservation of all rights not
expressly granted.
Cont ....
D Michael Rose
Sponsored by Walton & Parkinson Ltd, insurance brokers to the theatre industry.
Tel: 0845 218 4140. Email: enquiry@waltonandparkinson.co.uk.

So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 1.3 (Page 4 of 5)

KEY POINTS TO CONSIDER WHEN COMMISSIONING
OR OPTIONING A NEW PLAY OR A NEW MUSICAL


Applicable to both
Newly Commissioned
and Non-
Commissioned works

Hold-Backs:
Non-release of any reserved stage rights
either generally or in a specified territory
Non-release of music publishing before
producers cast album
Non-release of any reserved motion picture
rights
Free motion picture synchronisation right?

Royalties:
What total percentage of Weekly Box
Office Receipts (WBOR) (6% to 8%) for
authors copyright?
How split between various authors and
collaborators, and any new writers?
Any royalty pool or pre-recoupment royalty
cap to apply, and if so is there to be any
deferred claw back (see Section 4.6)
Any escalation by reference to recoupment
or a multiple of recoupment
Where royalties depend on recoupment
specify producers office management fee
and royalty in definition of recoupment
(usually management fee starts two weeks
prior to first rehearsal and ends two weeks
after closure)
Any other royalty limitations e.g. bad
debts, bus and truck company share
provision.

Subsidiary revenue:
How are profit shares (i.e. net revenue) to
be split between author and producer
relating to various different categories of
subsidiary rights?
How long sharing to continue?

Payment procedures:
Royalties
in UK within 7 days after end of each
week
overseas within 14-30 days after end
of each week/month
accompanied by copy box office
returns.
Cont ....
D Michael Rose
Sponsored by Walton & Parkinson Ltd, insurance brokers to the theatre industry.
Tel: 0845 218 4140. Email: enquiry@waltonandparkinson.co.uk.

So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 1.3 (Page 5 of 5)

KEY POINTS TO CONSIDER WHEN COMMISSIONING
OR OPTIONING A NEW PLAY OR A NEW MUSICAL


Applicable to both
Newly Commissioned
and Non-
Commissioned works

Subsidiary Revenue
motion picture within 14 days of
receipt
otherwise quarterly within 60 days
after end of each quarter
accompanied by financial statements.
Verification by inspection of accounts
Recoupment accounts, interim and final
production accounts
Production accountants
Withholding tax provisions.

Approval/consultation rights.

Billing credits and biogs.

Authors attendance rights, accommodation, travel expenses and per
diems.

Producer to have artistic control.

Warranties:
by owner
as to title
no obscene or defamatory content
by producer.

Moral Rights:
Is waiver needed? E.g. if changes are
contemplated.















This section has been specially prepared for Stage One by D. Michael Rose of Tarlo Lyons, Solicitors.
Copyright reserved to D Michael Rose
Sponsored by Walton & Parkinson Ltd, insurance brokers to the theatre industry.
Tel: 0845 218 4140. Email: enquiry@waltonandparkinson.co.uk.


KEY POINTS TO CONSIDER IN CREATIVE
TEAM CONTRACTS

Director, Choreographer (if any), Set Designer, Costume Designer, Lighting Designer, Sound
Designer (if any), Orchestrator (if any).
Standard Collective Agreements
Collective bargaining agreements exist for all members of the creative team (other than
orchestrator and sound designer) setting out minimum terms agreed between
SOLT/TMA/BECTU/Equity/MU on behalf of their members for both West End and elsewhere in the
UK. These minimum terms (where applicable) should be incorporated expressly into individual
contracts which, however, may supplement or enlarge the minimum terms by agreement between
the parties. Copies are obtainable from SOLT or TMA.
Key Points:
Contracting Parties individual personally or
lend-out company, plus inducement letter (guarantee) from
individual.
Repro and/or subsidiary
rights or not? If so
Query option to use in other stage productions
Query option to use in other media exploitation?
If Repro Rights apply Options for future engagement
Appointment of deputies
Approval of deputies and/or nomination rights
Any deduction from principals royalty of any part of deputys
remuneration?
Query need for changes in material. Moral rights waiver?
Tie in to Production
Schedule

Description of Services
and Duties
For initial production
Delivery of copyright record to producer
Exclusive availability from first rehearsal date
Quality checks after opening
Services for future repros.
Assistants and support
staff
What is a producer to

provide?
pay for?
Exclusive copyright licence Consider assignment as alternative
May pay more for assignment
Assignment may be resisted
Termination and Reverter (or Lapse).
Remuneration








Fees advance






Royalty

Amount?
How payable? Instalments? E.g. 1/3
on signature, 1/3 on first rehearsal,
1/3 after opening
query recoupable from royalties in
whole or in part?

For initial production
For repros

Continued ....
D Michael Rose
Sponsored by Walton & Parkinson Ltd, insurance brokers to the theatre industry.
Tel: 0845 218 4140. Email: enquiry@waltonandparkinson.co.uk.

So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 1.4 (Page 2 of 2)

KEY POINTS TO CONSIDER IN CREATIVE
TEAM CONTRACTS

Remuneration Cont .... Royalty limitations Caps
Pools
Deferrals
Waivers
Bus & truck - company share in
lieu of WBOR
Bad debts relief.
Any major and minor
territory differentials
in order to determine scope of rights
rate of remuneration.
Subsidiary exploitation at remuneration to be arranged or fixed in advance.
Expenses and ownership of
models, samples, sketches,
drawings.

Inspection and verification
of accounts if remuneration
dependent on recoupment.

Payment procedures and
accounting
for WBOR royalties
for share of subsidiary revenue.
Billing credits Size, prominence, layout
Biographies.
House seats (where
controlled).

Warranties By owner
By creative team member.
Query need to incorporate
SOLT/TMA/BECTU/Equity/M
U standard terms
refer to relevant standard booklet for details.
Retention of overall artistic
control by producer
Need for consultation by team among themselves and with the
producer.















This section has been specially prepared for the TIF by D. Michael Rose of Tarlo Lyons, Solicitors.
Copyright reserved to D Michael Rose


So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 2.1 (Page 1 of 4)

THE SOCIETY OF LONDON THEATRE (SOLT)




1.1 Introduction


The Society of London Theatre was formed in 1908 by the famous
Actor Manager, Sir Charles Wyndham. Originally named The Society
of West End Theatre Managers, it has changed its name to The
Society of West End Theatre, and latterly, The Society of London
Theatre, to reflect an increasingly wider London membership. The
Society is colloquially referred to as SOLT.

The Society represents the interests of the producers, owners and
managers who work in more than 50 of Londons commercial and
state-supported theatres. Theatres currently represented in SOLT
membership are:


Adelphi
Noel Coward
National (Olivier, Lyttelton,
Cottesloe)

Aldwych New Ambassadors

Apollo New London

Apollo Victoria Old Vic

Arts Open Air *

Barbican (Barbican, Pit) Palace

Cambridge Peacock

Coliseum Phoenix

Comedy Piccadilly

Criterion Playhouse

Dominion Prince Edward

Donmar Warehouse Prince of Wales

Drury Lane, Theatre Royal Queens

Duchess Royal Court

Duke of York's Royal Opera House

Fortune Sadlers Wells

Garrick St Martin's

Gielgud Savoy

Shakespeares Globe * Shaftesbury

Haymarket, Theatre Royal Novello

Her Majestys Vaudeville

London Apollo Hammersmith Victoria Palace

London Palladium Whitehall

Lyceum Wyndham's

Lyric * Seasonal















So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 2.1 (Page 2 of 4)

THE SOCIETY OF LONDON THEATRE (SOLT)





1.3 SOLT Publications

Publications include:
the Official London Theatre Guide - the definitive fortnightly
listing of productions in SOLT member theatres
the Official London Theatre Guide Online the worlds leading
London theatre website, constantly updated
(www.OfficialLondonTheatre.co.uk)
the Theatre List, a detailed fortnightly-updated list of current
shows and forthcoming shows aimed at theatre professionals,
critics, and committed theatregoers
the Access Guide to Londons Theatres detailing access and
equipment facilities and details of concessionary price/s
the Box Office Data Report annual summary and analysis of the
previous years box office figures, published each Spring
The Wyndham Report, After Wyndham a continuing series of
research and campaigning reports into key issues affecting
London theatre
the West End Theatre Audience Report the result of a major
research project by MORI into the profile of current theatre
audiences.


1.4 SOLT Services

Services include:
tkts Ticket Booths in Leicester Square and Canary Wharf DLR
station provide on the day sales to personal callers
Fax Back Service - dial a number and receive a seating plan
Newspaper listings comprehensive theatre listings compiled
currently for The Sunday Times, The Observer, The Daily Mail,
The Mail on Sunday and smaller syndicated publications
First Night List and Photocall Diary two SOLT-administered
services to avoid publicity clashes
Theatreland Car Parking Scheme - special evening rates for
theatre-goers at selected Westminster City Council Masterpark car
parks
Professional forums SOLT-chaired discussion and action groups
open to Members and their colleagues, e.g. SOLT Marketing
Group.



So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 2.1 (Page 3 of 4)

THE SOCIETY OF LONDON THEATRE (SOLT)





1.5 SOLT Promotional
Activities

Promotional activities include:
two big promotions and audience development initatives during
the year:
i) Get Into London Theatre in January which features offers on
many West End shows (www.getintolondontheatre.com)
ii) Kids Week in the West End, an annual late-summer audience
development initiative featuring Kids Go Free ticket offer and a
range of events, tours and parties (www.kidsweek.co.uk)
Theatre Tokens - a nationwide gift token scheme, on sale at
theatres, most branches of WH Smith, by telephone on 0870 164
8800 and online at www.theatretokens.com.
Travel Trade Conference/Exhibitions representing London
theatre at shows including World Travel Fair and British Travel
Trade Fair
The Laurence Olivier Awards the annual celebration of
excellence on the London stage.


1.6 To become a Producing
Member of SOLT


In order to apply for membership a producer should contact SOLT in
the first instance, and will then need to seek two Board members
who are willing to propose and second the application. Subject to
Board approval the application will then go to a ballot of the whole
membership where a simple majority will secure election. A producer
will need to place four deposits with the LTC (see section 2.3) and
establish a good track record of meeting obligations to Equity
members before being granted non-deposit status.


1.7 Benefits of Membership



include:-
standard contracts, minimum terms and conditions for employees
with entertainment unions Equity, M.U. and BECTU
free legal, industrial and professional advice from in-house staff
on all aspects of theatrical management
advertising opportunities at preferential rates in the London
Theatre Guide (distributed fortnightly to 175,500 readers)
publications and promotion initiatives
a public affairs and lobbying service from in-house staff and a
concerted national press voice
access to the Societys Angels list
regular circulations on current management information and
issues, e.g. industrial relations, employment law
national lobbying for theatrical causes
eligibility to participate in the Laurence Olivier Awards.


So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 2.1 (Page 4 of 4)

THE SOCIETY OF LONDON THEATRE (SOLT)





1.8

SOLT shares offices and some staff with the TMA (see Section 2.2)

Address: 32 Rose Street
Covent Garden
London WC2E 9ET

Tel: 020 7557 6700

Fax: 020 7557 6799

Email: enquiries@solttma.co.uk

Website: www.officiallondontheatre.co.uk


1.9

SOLT provides financial support annually to Stage One. In addition,
SOLT jointly established the Bursaries for New Producers with Stage
One and provides matching funding for the scheme.


SOLT
So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 2.2 (Page 1 of 4)


THE THEATRICAL MANAGEMENT
ASSOCIATION (TMA)







2.1 Introduction

Formed by Sir Henry Irving in 1894, Irvings first Presidential speech
introduced TMA as [protecting] ... the interests of theatrical managers, to
resist encroachments, and to obtain redress of grievances. The purpose
for which we have met here today must, I am quite sure, commend itself
to all. We are simply forming the nucleus of a protective body, so that we
can from a central point look after the interests of theatrical managers
throughout the country.

TMA is the UK-wide sister organisation of The Society of London Theatre
and has members in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales.

TMA Statement

The Theatrical Management Association represents the essential interests
of the performing arts in the UK.

TMA is dedicated to:-

promoting excellence in the production, presentation and management
of live performance
supporting its members in all aspects of their professional activities
strengthening links between members for the exchange of ideas,
information and expertise
encouraging recognition of the vital role of the performing arts.

TMA represents building-based theatres:

subsidised, producing houses
presenting / touring houses
commercial non-subsidised repertory
local authority venues
community theatres

and organisations:

touring companies - subsidised and commercial
opera & ballet
theatre for children, Theatre in Education & Young Peoples theatre.

TMA
So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 2.2 (Page 2 of 4)


THE THEATRICAL MANAGEMENT
ASSOCIATION (TMA)







A cross-section of its membership (nearly 400 members) is:-

Almeida Theatre, London

New Theatre, Cardiff
Birmingham Royal Ballet Palace Theatre, Watford
Bristol Old Vic Theatre QDOS
Bush Theatre, London Rambert Dance Company
Live Nation Riverside Theatre, Coleraine
Chichester Festival Theatre Scottish Opera
Churchill Theatre, Bromley Tara Arts
Derby Playhouse Complicite
Hampstead Theatre, London Theatre Royal, Norwich
The Hiss & Boo Company Theatre Royal, Plymouth
Michael Codron Plays Ltd Unicorn Theatre for Children
Midlands Arts Centre (mac) Welsh National Opera


2.2 Principal Activities of
TMA

standard terms and conditions negotiated with the entertainment unions
legal, industrial and management advice from in-house staff
lobbying and campaigning
nation-wide Awards scheme to promote regional theatre
Annual Conference for members as well as social events for networking
opportunities
the opportunity to participate in the nation-wide Theatre Tokens
scheme.


2.3 TMA Training

training policy activities across the sector, from senior arts management
training to customer service skills for FOH staff, using courses, local
networks, mentoring etc
The Druidstone Essentials of Marketing Course - TMAs long-running and
sought-after introduction to arts marketing employs experienced
marketeers to train those starting out on an arts marketing career
Walking the Tightrope - Management for Senior Arts Marketing staff
Making Tracks - a two day residential course for
managers/administrators of dance, drama, opera/music-theatre and
building based companies planning to develop their national touring
ad-hoc seminars and courses - recent topics have included box office
and marketing, data protection, contract and copyright law, direct
marketing, group sales.

TMA
So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 2.2 (Page 3 of 4)


THE THEATRICAL MANAGEMENT
ASSOCIATION (TMA)







2.4

TMA Website and
Publications

TMAs website at www.tmauk.org has steadily been developing since its launch in
May 2000. The public part of the site is accessible to anyone and it contains
several facilities which are of interest to new producers: -
the latest Pay Rates for TMAs agreements with the theatrical unions
an Events and Courses section
an informative page on TMAs quarterly magazine Prompt and details of
subscriptions
a list of TMA members with websites
a list of arts related website addresses
a job vacancy service for administration and management posts
information on the TMAs Theatre Awards.

The second part of the site is the password-protected area for TMA members,
which is substantially bigger. All the TMA circulations, or Newsletters,
automatically go onto the site and previous issues are archived. In addition in
this section of the site there are:
issues of Legal Update
Industrial Relations information and news
the full searchable TMA Membership Directory
Tour Booking facilities, with availability for shows and venues
Frequently Asked Questions
index of downloadable documents.

Prompt - TMAs quarterly journal produced for all those involved in theatre
management includes a wide range of articles, regular audience statistics and
TMAs ongoing business survey.


2.5

To become a
Producing Member
of the TMA

Applications are eligible from any producing company or organisation provided
they:-
are involved in whole or in part in the presentation of performing arts
can satisfy TMAs Council as to their legal and financial probity, and
subscribe to the aims of the Association.

TMA members are given 21 days notice in which to raise any objections to the
application, after which membership is granted.

So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 2.2 (Page 4 of 4)


THE THEATRICAL MANAGEMENT
ASSOCIATION (TMA)







2.6 TMA Membership fees

The basic membership fee for Commercial Producers is 233 per annum
plus VAT. In addition there will be a variable subscription fee charged
according to the number of weeks touring undertaken by productions
promoted directly by or managed through your company. The variable
subscription fee applied to a full or split week of a tour of a play will be
25.00 plus VAT; for a musical the variable subscription fee applied will be
40.00 per week plus VAT. Tours of one-night stands will not incur any
variable fee.


2.7 Benefits of Membership


include:-
standard contracts, terms and conditions for employees
free industrial, professional and legal advice from in-house staff
national lobbying and campaigns in the UK and in Europe on issues that
affect the theatre industry
Prompt, the TMAs lively and informative quarterly journal, enclosed
with regular circulations
audience survey figures throughout the year and summarised annually
eligibility for TMAs Theatre Awards
an annual Conference and regular networking opportunities to address
current concerns and catch up with other theatre professionals
custom-designed training courses
monthly circulations on current management information and issues,
e.g. health & safety, industrial relations, employment law
online Membership Directory with contact details of every member.


2.8

TMA shares offices and some staff with SOLT (see Section 2.1)

ADDRESS: 32 Rose Street
Covent Garden
London WC2E 9ET

Tel: 020 7557 6700

Fax: 020 7557 6799

Email: enquiries@solttma.co.uk

Website: www.tmauk.org

TMA
Sponsored by Walton & Parkinson Ltd, insurance brokers to the theatre industry.
Tel: 0845 218 4140. Email: enquiry@waltonandparkinson.co.uk.

So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 2.3 (Page 1 of 2)

LONDON THEATRE COUNCIL (LTC)


3.1 Introduction

The LTC was set up in 1935. It is managed by SOLT and
Equity and its principal activities are:

i) To arbitrate on any disputes arising from any of the
SOLT/Equity Agreements
ii) To ensure that any producer who is not a non deposit
member of SOLT places the required deposits with the
LTC for each production s/he presents under the
SOLT/Equity Agreements so that all the Equity members
so contracted are properly paid.


3.2 LTC Registration

All producers who are intending to produce at SOLT member
theatres and are not members of SOLT must register with the
LTC before any Equity members can be contracted and before
the standard contract forms will be issued by Equity.
Registration forms can be obtained from the SOLT offices,
where the LTC is administered, and the current registration fee
is 225.

EARLY LTC REGISTRATION IS ADVISED.


3.3 LTC Deposits

All producers who are not non deposit members of SOLT
must place deposits at least 14 days before the production is
scheduled to begin rehearsals. The reason for depositing is to
assure SOLT and Equity of financial integrity when contracting
employees. The deposit covers rehearsal salaries and three
weeks performance salaries, N.I. and VAT for:

Performers & Stage Managers
Choreographers & Assistant Choreographers
Directors & Assistant Directors
Designers & Assistant Designers
Fight Directors.

Depositing signals an intention to act in a responsible employer
manner so that if your production should fail in any way, the
deposit you have made will be used to pay back those
employees covered by your deposit.

To obtain copies of the deposit form call SOLT. A completed
form has been included as an illustration. The LTC will accept
deposits either by cheque or by bank guarantee. Please allow
time for the cheque to clear.
Cont .....

SOLT
Sponsored by Walton & Parkinson Ltd, insurance brokers to the theatre industry.
Tel: 0845 218 4140. Email: enquiry@waltonandparkinson.co.uk.

So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 2.3 (Page 2 of 2)

LONDON THEATRE COUNCIL (LTC)


3.3 LTC Deposits

Should a bank guarantee be used, it is essential to allow plenty
of time, as it can take 8 weeks or more to set up and process,
and all wording has to be agreed. A standard draft wording is
available from SOLT. If paying by bank guarantee, the
registration fee is 675.

IT IS ESSENTIAL TO MAKE SURE THAT THE FORM IS
RETURNED TO THE LTC WITH THE CHEQUE OR GUARANTEE
AT LEAST 14 DAYS BEFORE THE REHEARSALS START.




































SOLT

So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 2.4 (Page 1 of 2)

THE THEATRE COUNCIL (TTC)


4.1 Introduction

The TTC was set up in 1942. It is managed by the TMA and
Equity and its principal activities are:

i) To arbitrate on any disputes arising from any of the TMA/
Equity Agreements
ii) To ensure that any producer who is not a full member of
the TMA places the required deposit with the TTC for
each production he or she presents under TMA/Equity
contracts so that all the Equity members so contracted
are properly paid.


4.2 TTC Registration

All producers who are intending to use TMA/Equity Agreements,
which TMA members insist upon, must register with the TTC
before any Equity contracts can be issued. Registration forms
can be obtained from the TMA, where the TTC is administered,
and the current registration fee is 225.

EARLY TTC REGISTRATION IS ADVISED.


4.3 TTC Deposits



All producers who are not full members of the TMA, who want to
use TMA/Equity contracts, must place deposits with the TTC at
least 14 days before the production is due to start. The reason
for depositing is to assure TMA and Equity of financial integrity
when contracting employees. The deposit covers rehearsal
salaries and a maximum of three weeks performance salaries,
N.I. and VAT for:

Performers & Stage Managers
Choreographers & Assistant Choreographers
Directors & Assistant Directors
Designers & Assistant Designers
Fight Directors

Depositing signals an intention to act in a responsible employer
manner so that if your production should fail in any way, the
deposit you have made will be used to pay back those employees
covered by your deposit.

To obtain copies of the deposit form call the TMA. A completed
form has been included herewith as an illustration. The TTC will
accept deposits either by cheque or by bank guarantee. Please
allow time for the cheque to clear.
Cont .....
TMA
So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 2.4 (Page 2 of 2)

THE THEATRE COUNCIL (TTC)



4.3 TTC Deposits


Should a bank guarantee be used, it is essential to allow plenty
of time, as it can take 8 weeks or more to set up and process,
and all wording has to be agreed. A standard draft wording is
available from the TMA.

IT IS ESSENTIAL TO MAKE SURE THAT THE FORM IS
RETURNED WITH THE CHEQUE OR GUARANTEE AT LEAST 14
DAYS BEFORE THE PRODUCTION STARTS.










Sponsored by Walton & Parkinson Ltd, insurance brokers to the theatre industry.
Tel: 0845 218 4140. Email: enquiry@waltonandparkinson.co.uk.

So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 2.4 (Page 1 of 2)

EQUITY - STANDARD AGREEMENTS


5.1 Introduction

Equity represents performers and stage managers (including opera and
ballet), directors, set designers, costume designers, lighting designers,
choreographers and fight directors. SOLT and the TMA each negotiate
separate collective standard agreements with Equity for each of the above
(but curiously enough, not for sound designers). These include the
minimum terms and conditions for employment and the minimum pay
scales applicable.


5.2 SOLT/Equity
Agreements

Copies of all the Agreements are available from the SOLT office, and need
to be studied carefully before contracting anyone. The single most
important Agreement is the performers and stage management
Agreement. Particular attention should be paid to working hours, which
vary before, during and after the production week, and are different to the
TMA/Equity Agreement working hours. Also look carefully at the
cancellation of production and the minimum length of employment clauses,
plus the holiday payment clauses. Minimum stage management staffing
and understudy provisions also need careful consideration. (When
completing the standard SOLT/Equity form of contract, particular care must
be given to the notice clauses and options therein, and also the wording of
any special individual artist and stage management get out notice clauses.)
Beware of Christmas week and bank holidays - they are expensive, even
bearing in mind the cut off. Also do not forget that, if the production starts
in a subsidised theatre and if the producer has an option or other
agreement to move the production to the West End, then (for up to 3
weeks) the artists' rehearsal fees have to be 'topped up' by the difference
between the rehearsal salary actually paid by the subsidised theatre and
the salary that would be due under the West End Agreement.

Directors, designers and other Equity members of the creative team as in
5.1 above, have standard forms of contract that must be used. Particular
attention should be paid to who owns the copyright and what rights the
producer acquires (or doesnt) for further exploitation of the work. See
Section 1.4 Creative Team Contracts.


5.3 TMA/Equity
Agreements

Copies of all the Agreements are available from the TMA offices, and need
to be studied carefully before contracting anyone. Because of the different
needs of the TMA membership there are two different agreements for
performers and stage managers. Commercial producers will principally use
the TMA/Equity Commercial Theatre Agreement (often referred to as the
touring contract). A knowledge of the TMA/Equity Subsidised Repertory
Agreement may be useful for producers starting their productions at
subsidised producing theatres.

The TMA/Equity Commercial Theatre Agreement varies in many respects
for both performers and stage managers from the SOLT/Equity Agreement.
It is therefore important to read it carefully - especially the working hours
and holiday pay clauses. The many levels for stage management and
understudies need careful consideration, as does the difference between
subsistence and touring allowance. There is no minimum length of
employment, but the notice clause needs careful reading.
Sponsored by Walton & Parkinson Ltd, insurance brokers to the theatre industry.
Tel: 0845 218 4140. Email: enquiry@waltonandparkinson.co.uk.


So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 2.4 (Page 2 of 2)

EQUITY - STANDARD AGREEMENTS



5.4 Queries on
Standard
Contracts



In the case of any questions on contracts members are strongly
advised to call the SOLT/TMA Industrial Officer and not Equity, whose
interpretation of some clauses may be different from the Managers.




5.5 Pre West End
Tours



Pre West End tours can be contracted for up to 8 weeks on
SOLT/Equity contracts. However, before issuing this contract,
producers should take care to check that they will be able to fulfil the
minimum length of employment under this contract, which requires 8
weeks employment for productions that do not come into the West End
and 6 weeks for productions that do open in the West End. The
minimum employment terms include rehearsals. In the event that a
production starts with a subsidised producing company, the minimum
length of employment can be critical and producers may be best
advised, particularly if the West End theatre has not been contracted,
to use the TMA/Equity Commercial Theatre Agreement and take an
option on the Artists services for the West End.



SOLT/TMA



Sponsored by Walton & Parkinson Ltd, insurance brokers to the theatre industry.
Tel: 0845 218 4140. Email: enquiry@waltonandparkinson.co.uk.

So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 2.5 (Page 1 of 1)

MUSICIANS UNION - STANDARD AGREEMENTS


6.1 Introduction

The Musicians Union represents all musicians and has
agreements with both SOLT and the TMA.



6.2 MU Agreements

Other than the substantial differences in the minimum
applicable in the West End compared to the Regions, the
agreements are fairly similar. Very careful consideration should
be given to the clauses on working hours and overtime, as
musicians are basically paid on a three-hour session rate. Also
doubling and trebling increases costs. The definition of
once and twice nightly needs careful reading, as the time
periods are quite restrictive.



6.3 Engaging Musicians -
Fixers

It is normal to engage orchestras through a fixer and this is
strongly recommended as they will provide accurate budgets as
well as issuing contracts, administering and calculating the pay
of the musicians throughout. Fixers are paid a weekly fee by
the producer.



6.4 Queries on Standard
Contracts

Again, all members queries on the Musicians Union contracts
should be to the SOLT/TMA Industrial Officer.



6.5 MU Deposits

Please note that the Musicians Union sometimes requires
deposits from new producers, although there is no formal
arrangement through the Theatre Councils.




SOLT/TMA
So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 2.7 (Page 1 of 1)

BECTU - STANDARD AGREEMENTS


7.1 Introduction

SOLT and the TMA each have separate agreements with
BECTU, which represents all the technical backstage and front
of house staff. Because these staff are normally employed by
the theatres, producers do not have to employ them, except in
the case of wardrobe staff.



7.2 BECTU Agreements

The Agreements need attention, particularly the clauses
regarding levels of crewing, hours and pay.

BECTU members standard terms of employment are for a 5-
day week (40 hours for SOLT and 39 for TMA). Thus cover is
required for the sixth day or overtime has to be paid. The
major difference between the SOLT/BECTU and the
TMA/BECTU Agreements that will directly affect producers is
the get-out clauses, which on tour are very expensive.
Producers will also be affected by manning levels and bank
holidays, which are paid at double time, plus a day off in lieu -
i.e. treble time! Sunday working is also expensive and can be a
significant cost factor when touring larger productions that
require Sunday get-ins.



7.3 Queries on Standard
Agreements

Again, all members queries on the Agreements should be to
the SOLT/TMA Industrial Officer and not the Union.




Sponsored by Walton & Parkinson Ltd, insurance brokers to the theatre industry.
Tel: 0845 218 4140. Email: enquiry@waltonandparkinson.co.uk.
So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 2.7 (Page 1 of 1)

WRITERS GUILD AGREEMENT


8.1

There are no standard agreements for commercial productions
between the Writers Guild and either SOLT or the TMA. All
authors contracts are separately negotiable on a production-by-
production basis. See Section 1.2 on commissioning and
optioning plays and musicals.



8.2

There are, however, agreements within the subsidised theatre
with the Writers Guild for new work, and producers transferring
productions that have originated in the subsidised sector may
have to inherit all or some of the terms of these agreements.






SOLT/TMA
So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 2.8 (Page 1 of 1)

SCHEDULE OF SOLT/TMA AGREEMENTS



Parties


Agreement


Date


SOLT Agreements SOLT/BECTU SOLT/BECTU 1997
SOLT/Equity West End Theatre Choreographers 2003
SOLT/Equity West End Theatre Designers 1989
SOLT/Equity West End Directors 2006
SOLT/M.U. SOLT/M.U. 2005
SOLT/Equity West End Theatre Performers and
Stage Management

2002

TMA Agreements TMA/BECTU TMA/BECTU 2006
TMA/Equity Choreographers 2004
TMA/BECTU/Equity Theatre Designers 1999
TMA/Equity Theatre Directors 2002
TMA/Equity Subsidised Repertory 2003
TMA/Equity Commercial Theatre 2006
TMA/M.U. TMA/M.U. 2004
TMA/Equity Overseas Touring 2002
TMA/Writers Guild TMA/Writers Guild of G.B/Scottish
Society of Playwrights

1993

Joint Agreements SOLT/TMA/Equity Opera Singers 1991
Opera Guest Artists 1995
Opera and Ballet Stage Management 1991
Ballet and Dance 1994
Opera Producers and Directors 2006
Fight Directors 1995



Copies of all these agreements can be obtained from SOLT and the TMA and are priced 3 per copy.
Cheques for SOLT Agreements should be made payable to West End Theatre Managers. Cheques
for TMA Agreements should be made payable to the Theatrical Management Association.

Contact the Assistant to the Industrial Officer on 020 7557 6700 to purchase copies of agreements.




SOLT/TMA
So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 2.9 (Page 1 of 1)
SOLT - CURRENT UNION RATES

SOLT/Equity West End Theatre
Designers (from April 28, 2003)
SOLT/BECTU (from October 2, 2006)
Minimum Basic Rates Per Show
Sets
a Major Musicals
3,944.00
b Musicals
3,069.00
c Straight Plays/Small Musicals
2,281.00
d Weekly fee
119.00

Costumes
a Major Musicals
2,632.00
b Musicals
2,061.00
c Straight Play/Small Musicals 1,535.00
d Weekly fee
92.00

Lighting
a Major Musicals
1,976.00
b Musicals
1,535.00
c Straight Plays/Small Musicals
1,140.00
d Weekly fee
71.00

Expenses
per day
35.05
overnight 78.88
Grade

3




4


5

6
8


9




10


Console Operator
Sound Operator
Chargehand
Electrician
Chargehand Stage
Asst Console
Operator
Follow-spot Operator
Swing Showman
Showman/Super
Dresser
Performance Fireman
Head Bar Person
Attendant Cleaner
Performance Cashier
Bar Person
Checktaker
Usherette - no
commission
Cloakroom Attendant
Usherette - with
commission
Hours
per show
3
3

3
3
3
3
3
3
3!
5
3!
3!
3!
3!
3!

3!
3!
3!

1-nightly
per show
28.20
28.20

28.20
28.20
27.38
27.38
27.38
25.98
32.45
38.81
22.83
22.83
22.83
22.24
22.24

22.24
22.24
19.91

2-nightly
per show
51.72
51.72

51.72
51.72
50.20
50.20
50.20
47.64
49.76
50.45
36.52
36.52
36.52
35.58
35.58

35.58
35.58
31.88
SOLT/Equity West End Theatre Directors
(from 1 August 2006)

Hourly Paid Staff
Clause No. Description
1.6.2 Minimum initial fee -
2,662.00
1.7 Subsistence
114.00
Wardrobe Daytime Assistant
Production Worker
Skilled Production Worker
8.66
8.66
9.12
SOLT/Equity West End Theatre
Choreographers (from June 1, 2005)

Minimum Basic Weekly Rates

Grade
1


2





3




4

5


6


7

Chief Electrician
Master Carpenter
Wardrobe/Wig Master/Mistress*
Deputy Chief Electrician
Deputy Master Carpenter
Box Office 1st Assistant
Wardrobe/Wig Master/Mistress*
Deputy Wardrobe/ Wig
Master/Mistress*
Chargehand Electrician
Chargehand Stage
Box Office 2nd Assistant
Deputy Wardrobe/Wig
Master/Mistress*
1st Grade Electrician
1st Grade Stage
Dayman (Trainee)*
Full-time Wardrobe Assistant
Housekeeper
Stage Door Keeper
Full-time Fireman
Box Office Clerk/Telephonist
Cleaner
Hours
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
40

40
40
40
40

40
40
40
40
36
40
40
40
24

477.94
477.94
477.94
407.84
407.84
407.84
407.84
407.84

376.19
376.19
376.19
376.19

365.21
365.21
346.40
346.40
311.78
317.03
310.42
310.42
177.21

Front-of-house Staff Additional Payments

Clause No.
17(a)(i) Minimum fee for musicals 2,858.00
(ii) Additional weeks
572.00
(iii) Minimum royalty
114.00
17(b)(i) Minimum fee for plays
1,671.00
(ii) Additional sessions
97.00
(iii) Minimum royalty
59.00
17(c) Small amount of choreography
(per session)
97.00
AC Appendix 5(d)
102.00
Programme Sellers
Cloakroom Attendants
Bar Person
Pick-ups
Per week


Per show
0.69
0.51
0.75
2.22
*See notes in Section 23 of Agreement

Section 2.9 (page 2 of 2)
SOLT - CURRENT UNION RATES


SOLT/EQUITY WEST END THEATRE
PERFORMERS AND STAGE MANAGEMENT
(from January 8, 2007)
SOLT/MUSICIANS UNION
(from October 1, 2006)
Clause


3.1.1
4.2.1




Apdx 1




Apdx 2
Apdx 3



3.1.2
3.1.3
Description

MINIMUM SALARIES
Minimum salary once nightly
ASM once nightly
DSM once nightly
SM once nightly
CSM once nightly

Performer/ASM twice nightly
DSM twice nightly
SM twice nightly
CSM twice nightly

Booth Singers session fee
Pension contributions max.
employers contribution

ADDITIONAL PAYMENTS
Movement of scenery, per perf.
Flying



381.13
381.13
476.40
533.58
571.69

446.62
558.29
625.29
669.95

47.64
33.34



1.60
39.40

Clause

5(a)


5(c)


5(e)(i)



5(e)(ii)


7(g)




7(i)




5(d)

Description

Min. weekly salary


Min. cash increase

Doubling
Min. weekly salary


Trebling
Min. weekly salary


On Stage etc.


Additional costume

Porterage




Pension



O/N
T/N




O/N
T/N


O/N
T/N

O/N
T/N



A
B

C





683.34
820.24

28.80

785.84
943.27


888.34
1,066.31

8.39
6.15

2.80

32.44
24.04
(max 48.08)
16.21

25.50
Contribution
3.1.5
3.6.2.3
Head Boy/Girl
Understudy responsibility payments
- each leading role
76.21

33.02

SOLT/TMA/EQUITY FIGHT DIRECTORS
(from December 1, 2006)

3.6.3.1


3.6.7
4.1.3

4.7.5.1
- up to two non-leading roles
Understudy performance payments
- leading role
- non-leading role
Swing, additional responsibility
Performer with stage management
duties, per week
Appearance on stage
24.77

30.51
18.29
56.29
15.24

5.44

Fees for a 3" hour session


West EndRNT/RSC/Major Opera & Dance
Provincial Commercial/Sub-Rep Grade 1
Sub-Rep Grade 2
Sub-Rep Grade 3/Minor Opera & Dance





99.00
88.00
78.50
67.00


2.3.1
2.3.2

2.12.1.4
2.12.1.6
3.5.1.3
4.7.1
4.7.1


2.2.7
2.3.1
2.3.2
2.5.1.2
2.5.2.2
2.6.2.1
2.6.2.3

3.1.1.2
3.1.1.3
3.4.1


2.12.1.5
2.12.3.3


ALLOWANCES
Touring allowance
Subsistence allowance (as per
TMA/Equity SR Agreement)
Meal allowance
Sunday travel meal allowance
Costume call meal allowance
Lodging allowance, per night
Lodging allowance, per week

CEILINGS
Failure to produce
Touring allowance cut off salary
Subsistence cut off
Public holiday ceiling salary
Christmas holiday ceiling salary
Illness payments ceiling salary
Illness payments cut off (higher)
Illness payments cut off (lower)
Ceiling salary during rehearsals
Cast replacement ceiling salary
Overtime ceiling

INSURANCE
Travel insurance premium cover
Air travel insurance cover
Air travel insurance cover

152.45
114.00

21.73
21.73
21.73
108.64
325.98


1,524.49
2,286.74
2,286.74
533.58
2,286.74
1,143.37
2,286.74
571.69
495.47
533.58
495.47


27,385.00
195,612.00
26,081.00



SOLT October 2007

u

TMA - CURRENT UNION RATES


TMA/Equity/BECTU/Theatre Designers

TMA/Equity Theatre Choreographers
(From October 1, 2006)
Minimum fees - Commercial Theatre
Tours and Seasons 1,032.00
Lower Minimum/Commercial Repertory 554.00
Minimum fees - Subsidised Repertory
MRSL 1 1,005.00
MRSL 2 898.00
MRSL 3 843.00
Additional weeks - Commercial Theatre
Tours and Seasons 353.00
Lower Minimum Productions/Commercial Rep 232.00
Additional weeks - Subsidised Repertory
MRSL 1 402.00
MRSL 2 359.00
MRSL 3 337.00
Additional Days
Tours & Seasons/MRSL 1 & 2 105.00
MRSL 3 95.00
Exceptional Minimum/Commercial Repertory 67.50
Daily Engagements
Tours and Seasons / MRSL 1 and 2 157.00
MRSL 3 121.00
Exceptional Minimum/Commercial Repertory 91.00


TMA/Musicians Union (Interim Rates)
(From April 15, 2006)

Once nightly 355.55
Twice nightly 371.71
Twice daily 365.25
Overtime per ! hour 5.56/4.97/4.89
Additional/Sunday Performances 44.44/30.98/30.44
Sunday rehearsals: -1
st
3hrs 88.89
then per 15 mins 9.25/8.29/8.16
Subsistence 114.00
Touring allowance 177.50
Performances out of the playing area:
Once-Nightly 3.31 (max 26.48)
Twice-Daily or Nightly 2.96 (max 35.52)
Porterage (A,B,C) 1 instrument 10.34
- 2 or more instruments 20.68
Mileage allowance 0.21

TMA/BECTU
(From April 3, 2006)

Resident Designers

Minimum Salaries (from April 2, 2007)

Head of Design
MRSL 1 427.67
MRSL 2 415.62
MRSL 3 377.50

Resident Designer
MRSL 1 396.79
MRSL 2 383.75
MRSL 3 347.88

Assistant Designer 324.97


Freelance Designers

Minimum Fees (from April 2, 2007)


Set and Costume Lighting
Theatre/RSC/RNT
Full 5,638.00 2,584.00
Small 3,383.00 1,292.00

Subsidised Theatre
MRSL 1 3,238.00 1,209.00
Tour 1,685.00
Studio/Workshop 1,377.00 579.00
MRSL 2 & 3
Major 2,372.00 660.00
Studio/Workshop 1,143.00 527.00

Commercial Theatre
Normal Minimum Tour/Season
Musical 2,814.00 1,778.00
Straight Play 2,263.00 992.00
Exceptional Minimum Tour/Season
Tour/Season/Rep/Sessional 1,217.00 475.00

Opera & Ballet
Opera A (ROH/ENO)
Full 6,198.00 3,015.00
1 Act & small-scale tours 2,882.00 1,381.00

Opera B (SO/WNO/Opera North/Glyndebourne)
Full 4,509.00 1,722.00
1 Act 1,919.00 783.00
Small-scale tour 2,112.00 858.00

Opera C
Full 2,121.00 862.00
1 Act 964.00 475.00

Ballet A (Royal Ballet/BRB/ENB)
Full 5,638.00 1,722.00
1 Act 1,803.00 783.00
Small-scale tour 2,112.00 858.00

Ballet B (Rambert/Northern/Scottish)
Full 2,894.00 1,506.00
1 Act 1,056.00 588.00
Small-scale tour 2,112.00 795.00

Ballet C (all others)
Full 2,121.00 756.00
1 Act 423.00 475.00
Minimum weekly rates

Grade 1 per hour 6.70
Grade 2 per hour 6.12
Grade 3 per hour 5.68
Grade 4 per hour 5.35
Performance Staff (Once nightly)
Stage per performance 18.73
Front-of-house per performance 18.73
Performance Fireman 26.75
Clause 2.3.3 Meal expenses 4.29
Subsistence (per week) 70.64
Subsistence over 4 hours 5.90
over 8 hours 11.78
over 12 hours 17.65
Clause 2.18.4 Overnight allowance 27.38
Long stay/tour- per week 163.33
Travel mileage (per mile)
first 30 miles 0.42
subsequent miles 0.28
Get out First 2 hours 74.69
Each subsequent hour 37.32
Get out (Exceptions) First 4 hours 132.83
Each subsequent hour 41.51
Ancillary payments 7.02
Pick-ups 1.29
Call outs 16.99


TMA CURRENT UNION RATES


TMA/Equity Commercial Theatre
(From April 2, 2007)

TMA/Equity Theatre Directors
(Minimum fees and salaries from April 3, 2006

Normal Minimum
Rehearsal Performer / ASM
Rehearsal DSM
Rehearsal SM
Rehearsal C&SM

Performer / ASM once nightly / twice nightly
DSM once nightly / twice nightly
SM once nightly / twice nightly
C&SM once nightly / twice nightly

Exceptional Minimum
Performer / ASM once nightly / twice nightly
DSM once nightly / twice nightly
SM once nightly / twice nightly
C&SM once nightly / twice nightly

Subsistence
Weekly Touring Allowance

Daily Touring Allowance
Understudy obligation (per role per week)
Understudy performance (per performance)
Understudy performance payment (ceiling)
Swing Dancer (per week)
Dance Captain (per week)
Flying (per week)
Ceiling Salary (per week)

314.00
392.50
439.50
471.00

330.00 / 355.00
413.00 / 444.00
462.00 / 497.00
495.00 / 533.00


281.50 / 303.50
352.00 / 379.50
394.00 / 425.00
422.50 / 455.50

94.50
177.50

38.33
13.63
20.43
61.31
1705
30.66
38.15
540.86


Subsidised Repertory
Freelance MRSL 1
2
3

Artistic Dir MRSL 1
2/3
Resident Dir MRSL 1
2
3
Assistant Directors all

Commercial Tours/
Seasons
Exceptnl Min - short run
long run
Normal Min - short run
long run

Min. weekly fees - EM
NM

Commercial Repertory
Freelance
Resident Director - LM
HM

CREATIVE
FEE

877.34
795.08
740.28

per week:













per week:



658.03
per week:


ESP p.w.


402.00
359.00
337.00

515.79
476.75
428.10
404.14
379.47
326.85








101.40
145.59


277.22
325.37
390.44

TOTAL
FEE + 4ESP

2,485.34
2,231.08
2,088.28










1,386.34
2,079.50
1,848.45
3,080.74





1,766.91

TMA/Equity Subsidised Repertory Performers
and Stage Management
(From April 2, 2007)

TMA/Writers Guild
(From June 19, 2006)

Commissioned Play
2(a)(i)
2(a)(ii)
2(a)(iii)
MRSL 1

3,917.00
1,781.00
1,781.00
MRSL 2

3,203.00
1,424.00
1,424.00
MRSL 3

2,493.00
1,424.00
1,424.00

Non-Commissioned Play
2(b)(i)
2(b)(ii)

Rehearsal attendance

Options (all grades)


5,698.00
1,781.00

52.55




4,628.00
1,424.00

46.09


3,916.00
1,424.00

42.39
1
2/3
4

Management Participation
Threshold
(all grades)
2,221.00
3,704.00
2,962.00



42,323.00


SOLT/TMA/Equity Fight Directors
(From December 1, 2006)


Performers - Minimum salary 338.00
MRSL Grade 1 414.00
MRSL Grade 2 370.00
MRSL Grade 3 347.00

Stage Management
ASM - MRSL Grade 1,2 and 3 310.00
DSM - MRSL Grade 1 370.00
DSM - MRSL Grade 2 337.00
DSM - MRSL Grade 3 325.00
SM MRSL Grade 1 414.00
SM MRSL Grade 2 370.00
SM MRSL Grade 3 347.00
CSM - MRSL Grade 1 448.00
CSM - MRSL Grade 2 400.00
CSM - MRSL Grade 3 378.00

Subsistence Relocation Allowance 119.00
Subsistence Commuting Allowance 105.00

Weekly Touring Allowance 170.00

Daily Touring Allowance 29.64
Out of Pocket Expenses 9.55
Understudy obligation (per week) 16.18
Additional roles 5.55
Performance payment - leading 19.72
Performance payment other 11.96
Mileage allowance 0.43
Flying 32.89
Stage Management in costume 4.96
Stage Management extra services 83.25
Head Boy/Girl 24.49


Fees for a 3" hour session

West End/NT/RSC/Major Opera & Dance
Commercial/MRSL Grade 1
MRSL Grade 2
MRSL Grade 3/Minor Opera & Dance



99.00
88.00
78.50
67.00
TMA October 2007
Sponsored by Walton & Parkinson Ltd, leading insurance brokers to the theatre industry.
Tel: 020 7929 4747. Email: enquiries@waltonandparkinson.co.uk.
So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 3.3 (Page 1 of 2)

KEY POINTS TO CONSIDER WHEN CONTRACTING
WITH A NO.1 TOURING THEATRE


General Comments

Touring venues are usually booked up a long way in advance.
Most operate on a system whereby they will make a "pencil
booking" first and then confirm or otherwise nearer the time. No
contract exists until the booking is confirmed and the terms and
conditions agreed.


2.1 The Terms

Guarantee to producer:
Are royalties included or off the top before guarantee paid -
how much is the guarantee
Second call to venue - how much
How are the remaining receipts shared
Guarantees on account of percentage of box office receipts.
First Call to producer:
How much is first call
Royalties off the top or included
Second call to venue
How are the remaining receipts shared.
Sharing deal:
How are receipts shared
Royalties off the top before receipts shared or does the
producer pay royalties from his/her share
Does producer's share of receipts increase over an agreed box
office figure.


2.2 Box Office Ticket Prices

Full prices - total seat value per performance and per week
Concessions and discounts
Complimentary tickets (NB local clubs, schemes, sponsors, etc.)
Any deductions (other than VAT) from weekly receipts - e.g.
credit card commissions at cost or marked up?
agents commissions
ticketing charge (e.g. for computer use).
Check when pencilling dates:
Current business levels
Level of business for same week(s) last year and details of
show.


2.3 Advertising, Print and
Publicity

Total weekly spend by venue
How much is charged to producer each week (may be
negotiable)
Will any additional promotion be needed, if so who pays
Mailing list details - numbers mailed and with what
Position of production in venue's brochure(s)
Advertising schedule
Quantities of print required to be supplied by producer and
sizes thereof
What information does the venue require to be included on
print
Number of photos, synopses, cast lists and press releases
required by venue.
Stage One
Sponsored by Walton & Parkinson Ltd, leading insurance brokers to the theatre industry.
Tel: 020 7929 4747. Email: enquiries@waltonandparkinson.co.uk.
So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 3.3 (Page 2 of 2)

KEY POINTS TO CONSIDER WHEN CONTRACTING
WITH A NO.1 TOURING THEATRE


2.4 Staff

How many does venue supply free of charge for get in, fit up
and running
Charges for any extra staff - what rates - who pays
Sunday get in - who pays, how shared
Get out - at what rates.


2.5 Miscellaneous

Is contract dependent on star name(s) - if star does not appear
do terms still apply?
Is there a penalty for no interval?
Is there a penalty for less than 8 performances per week?
Merchandise arrangements
PRS charges/payment
Foreign artists - the law requires the theatre to withhold tax at
the standard rate from monies due to producer until Inland
Revenue give clearance on foreign artists
Arrangements for payment on account during playing weeks
including any cash drawing requirements
Final accounting date by venue to producer
Insurance, licensing, health and safety requirements,
regulations and legislation.
























Stage One
So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 3.2 (Page 1 of 1)
LONDON WEST END THEATRES -
CONTACTS FOR BOOKING THEATRES

Contact: Michael Lynas
The Ambassador Theatre Group
Duke of Yorks Theatre
104 St Martins Lane
London WC2N 4BG
Tel: 020 7854 7000

COMEDY, DUKE OF YORKS, FORTUNE, NEW AMBASSADORS,
PHOENIX, PICCADILLY, PLAYHOUSE, SAVOY, TRAFALGAR
STUDIOS


Contact: Fiona Callaghan
Criterion Theatre
Piccadilly Circus
London SW1Y 4XA
Tel: 020 7839 8811

CRITERION


Contact: Richard Johnston
Delfont Mackintosh Theatres Ltd
The Novello Theatre
Aldwych
London WC2B 4LD
Tel: 020 7379 4431

ALBERY, GIELGUD, PRINCE EDWARD, PRINCE OF WALES,
QUEENS, NOVELLO, WYNDHAMS


Contact: Nigel Everett
Haymarket Theatre Royal
Haymarket
London SW1Y 4HT
Tel: 020 7930 8890

THEATRE ROYAL HAYMARKET


Contact: Live Nation
35-36 Grosvenor Street
London
W1K 4QX
Tel: 020 7529 4300

APOLLO VICTORIA, CARLING APOLLO HAMMERSMITH,
DOMINION, LYCEUM








Contact: Michael Codron CBE
Michael Codron Plays Ltd
Aldwych Theatre Offices
Aldwych
London WC2B 4DF
Tel: 020 7240 8291

ALDWYCH

Contact: Nica Burns
NIMAX Theatres Ltd
1 Lumley Court, Off 402 The Strand
London WC2R 0NB
Te: 020 7395 0783
0845 434 9290

APOLLO, DUCHESS, GARRICK, LYRIC, VAUDEVILLE

Contact: Dagma Waltz
The Old Vic
The Cut
London SE1 8NB
Tel: 020 7928 2651

THE OLD VIC

Contact: Real l y Useful Theatres
Manor House, 21 Soho Square
London W1V 5FD
Tel: 020 7494 5200

ADELPHI, CAMBRIDGE, HER MAJESTYS, LONDON
PALLADIUM, NEW LONDON, PALACE, THEATRE ROYAL
DRURY LANE

Contact:
Sir Stephen Waley-Cohen, Bt
Victoria Palace Theatre
Victoria Street
London SW1E 5EA
Tel: 020 7828 0600

ST. MARTINS, VICTORIA PALACE

Contact: James Williams
Theatre of Comedy Company Ltd
Shaftesbury Theatre
210 Shaftesbury Avenue
London WC2H 8DP
Tel: 020 7379 3345

SHAFTESBURY


So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 3.3 (Page 1 of 2)

KEY POINTS TO CONSIDER WHEN CONTRACTING WITH
A NO.1 TOURING THEATRE


General Comments

Touring venues are usually booked up a long way in advance. Most
operate on a system whereby they will make a "pencil booking" first
and then confirm or otherwise nearer the time. No contract exists
until the booking is confirmed and the terms and conditions agreed.


2.1 The Terms

Guarantee to producer:
Are royalties included or off the top before guarantee paid - how
much is the guarantee
Second call to venue - how much
How are the remaining receipts shared
Guarantees on account of percentage of box office receipts.
First Call to producer:
How much is first call
Royalties off the top or included
Second call to venue
How are the remaining receipts shared.
Sharing deal:
How are receipts shared
Royalties off the top before receipts shared or does the producer
pay royalties from his/her share
Does producer's share of receipts increase over an agreed box
office figure.


2.2 Box Office Ticket Prices

Full prices - total seat value per performance and per week
Concessions and discounts
Complimentary tickets (NB local clubs, schemes, sponsors, etc.)
Any deductions (other than VAT) from weekly receipts - e.g. credit
card commissions at cost or marked up?
agents commissions
ticketing charge (e.g. for computer use).
Check when pencilling dates:
Current business levels
Level of business for same week(s) last year and details of show.


2.3 Advertising, Print and
Publicity

Total weekly spend by venue
How much is charged to producer each week (may be negotiable)
Will any additional promotion be needed, if so who pays
Mailing list details - numbers mailed and with what
Position of production in venue's brochure(s)
Advertising schedule
Quantities of print required to be supplied by producer and sizes
thereof
What information does the venue require to be included on print
Number of photos, synopses, cast lists and press releases required
by venue.
Theatre Investment Fund
So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 3.3 (Page 2 of 2)

KEY POINTS TO CONSIDER WHEN CONTRACTING WITH
A NO.1 TOURING THEATRE


2.4 Staff

How many does venue supply free of charge for get in, fit up and
running
Charges for any extra staff - what rates - who pays
Sunday get in - who pays, how shared
Get out - at what rates.


2.5 Miscellaneous

Is contract dependent on star name(s) - if star does not appear do
terms still apply?
Is there a penalty for no interval?
Is there a penalty for less than 8 performances per week?
Merchandise arrangements
PRS charges/payment
Foreign artists - the law requires the theatre to withhold tax at the
standard rate from monies due to producer until Inland Revenue
give clearance on foreign artists
Arrangements for payment on account during playing weeks
including any cash drawing requirements
Final accounting date by venue to producer
Insurance, licensing, health and safety requirements, regulations
and legislation.
























Jan 2000 Theatre Investment Fund

So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 3.4 (Page 1 of 1)

KEY POINTS TO CONSIDER WHEN CONTRACTING A
CO-PRODUCTION WITH A PRODUCING THEATRE


3.1 Artistic

Who chooses cast, creative team, etc.
Who approves designs etc. - to what standard is the physical
production to be built (e.g. class 1 timber)
Who has overall artistic control.


3.2 At Producing Theatre

What is budget, who pays costs
Does producer make "top up" payment to producing theatre,
if so how much
Who owns rights to play, who pays royalties to author
Who retains box office receipts
Does producing theatre pay any part of box office receipts to
producer
Are all cast and creative team paid by producing theatre -
any top up from producer to cast or creative team
Who authorises/pays any over budget costs
Billing and programme credits/biography for producer.


3.3 During Commercial
Exploitation of
Production

What will producing theatre receive: - weekly royalty on box
office receipts or is it fixed - rising on recoupment - built in
royalty waivers
Any profit share (if any)
Are rights assigned to or already owned by commercial
producer
Lump sum payment (if any) for physical production to
producing theatre
Hire charges (if any) for physical production to producing
theatre
Who owns physical production and who maintains, stores and
insures it
Right to use graphic design(s) and production photos from
producing theatre
Arrangements for commercial producer to take over hired (or
borrowed goods) from producing theatre
Billing and programme credits/biographies for producing
theatre.












Feb 2001 Theatre Investment Fund

Sponsored by Walton & Parkinson Ltd, leading insurance brokers to the theatre industry.
Tel: 020 7929 4747. Email: enquiries@waltonandparkinson.co.uk.
So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 3.4 (Page 1 of 1)

KEY POINTS TO CONSIDER WHEN CONTRACTING A
CO-PRODUCTION WITH A PRODUCING THEATRE


3.1 Artistic

Who chooses cast, creative team, etc.
Who approves designs etc. - to what standard is the physical
production to be built (e.g. class 1 timber)
Who has overall artistic control.


3.2 At Producing Theatre

What is budget, who pays costs
Does producer make "top up" payment to producing theatre,
if so how much
Who owns rights to play, who pays royalties to author
Who retains box office receipts
Does producing theatre pay any part of box office receipts to
producer
Are all cast and creative team paid by producing theatre -
any top up from producer to cast or creative team
Who authorises/pays any over budget costs
Billing and programme credits/biography for producer.


3.3 During Commercial
Exploitation of
Production

What will producing theatre receive: - weekly royalty on box
office receipts or is it fixed - rising on recoupment - built in
royalty waivers
Any profit share (if any)
Are rights assigned to or already owned by commercial
producer
Lump sum payment (if any) for physical production to
producing theatre
Hire charges (if any) for physical production to producing
theatre
Who owns physical production and who maintains, stores and
insures it
Right to use graphic design(s) and production photos from
producing theatre
Arrangements for commercial producer to take over hired (or
borrowed goods) from producing theatre
Billing and programme credits/biographies for producing
theatre.












Stage One

So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 4.1 (Page 1 of 2)

BUDGETING FOR THE COMMERCIAL THEATRE


Introduction

Budgeting is partly an art and partly a science. Much of the information needed
for budgeting can be accurately deduced but a certain amount can only be
educated guesswork.


Before attempting to budget,
gather as much information
as you can. This should
include:-


An outline date schedule, showing the number of rehearsal weeks, get in
days, rehearsal days on stage, number of previews and the opening night.
Is the show to be produced directly into the West End, opened out of town
and transferred to the West End, opened out of town and toured, or toured
and then transferred to the West End.
What are the Authors deals and who will make up the Creative Team.
What is the size of the Cast, how many Understudies will be needed and what
are the top salaries likely to be. Will there be a Star on a percentage.
For a musical, the size of the Orchestra, the musical line up and will the
Musical Director be included in the line up or is he or she an extra person.
The make up of the stage management and other technical departments, to
include:- Wardrobe and Dressers, Wigs, Sound, Lighting and Follow Spots,
Automation and Projection, Stage Staff and, if there are children in the
company, Chaperones.
What production staff will be needed - consult an experienced Production
Manager.
Will the show require the services of a General Manager.
Consult with your lawyer, accountant and insurance broker on their likely
levels of fees and costs.
What Theatre will the show be suited to. Ideally get a total seater from the
Theatre on the basis of the seat prices you expect to charge. Also try to
establish the costs the Theatre will pass on to you (the contra) and the level
of rent you will be able to negotiate both before and after recoupment.
You need to have a clear idea of the scope of the physical production in terms
of the set, props, costumes, wigs, lighting, sound, special effects and any
other areas which must be included in the budget. This area of production
budgeting requires some use of a crystal ball and more practically the advice
of an experienced Production Manager. This area of budgeting will also have
a very real influence on the artistic scale and style of the production and
needs careful consideration.
Take advice from a reputable theatre advertising and marketing company on
their suggestions for setting budgets in all areas of advertising, marketing,
print, photographs and front of house display.

Andrew Treagus

So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 4.1 (Page 2 of 2)

BUDGETING FOR THE COMMERCIAL THEATRE


The Budget

The sample outline budget on the next 2 pages is divided by columns to show:-

Production Costs, all costs which will be incurred in mounting the
production up to the first paid performance. Include also costs which cannot
be classified as regular running costs, up to the Press Night (e.g. the Press
Night party).

Running Costs, all costs of running the production on a weekly basis. Be
sure to include all costs which cannot be classified as production costs.

Royalties, the weekly percentage payments to Authors, the Creative Team
and the Producers, based on the weekly net box office receipts.

Notes on the outline budget follow, and should help to explain what each line
in the budget refers to.



























Andrew Treagus

So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 4.2 (Page 1 of 3)

OUTLINE BUDGET


PRODUCTION TITLE:


Date
PRODUCTION RUNNING ROYALTY NOTES

FEES
Authors 1
Director 2
Choreographer 2
Set Designer 2
Costume Designer 2
Lighting Designer 2
Sound Designer 2
Orchestrator/Arranger 2
Production Musical Director 3
Orchestral Manager 4
Casting Director 5
Creative team assistants 6
General Manager/Producer 7
Production Manager 8
Costume Supervisor 9
Props Supervisor 9
Production Carpenter 9
Production Electrician 9
Production Sound 9
Total Fees 0.00 0.00 0.00%

PHYSICAL PRODUCTION
Set 10
Props 10
Costumes/Wigs 10
Electrics 11
Sound 11
Transport 12
Musical Instruments 13
Misc.
Fit up (Contractors labour) 14
L.X. Hires 15
Sound Hires 15
Other Hires 15
Total Physical Production 0.00 0.00
Andrew Treagus
So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 4.2 (Page 2 of 3)

OUTLINE BUDGET

PRODUCTION RUNNING ROYALTY NOTES

SALARIES people weeks
Lead Artists 16
Princi ples 16
Ensemble & Swings 16
Understudies 16
Overti me 17
Musi cal Director 18
Assistant MD 19
Rehearsal Musi cian 20
Orchestral Salaries 21
Company Manager 22
Stage Manager 22
DSM 22
ASMs 22
Engineer & Prod L.X. 23
Sound 24
Wardrobe 25
Wigs 25
Overti me 17
Staff Director 26
Dance Captain 27
NI/Pensions/Hol Reserve 0.00 0.00 28
Total Salaries 0.00 0.00

THEATRE COSTS
Theatre Rent 29
Theatre Contra 30
Running Staff - Stage & Flys 31
Running Staff LX & Fol low
spots
31
Running Staff - Dressers 31
Fit up 32
Misc.
Total Theatre Costs 0.00 0.00

REHEARSAL COSTS
Audition costs 33
Scripts/Scores/Copying 36
Rehearsal Rooms 34
Rehearsal Hires 35
S.M. Petty Cash 37
Travel and subsistence 38
Misc.
Total Rehearsal Costs 0.00 0.00
Andrew Treagus
So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 4.2 (Page 3 of 3)

OUTLINE BUDGET


PRODUCTION RUNNING ROYALTY NOTES
ADVERTISING & PR.
Advertising 39
FOH Display 39
Print 39
Marketing 39
PR Fee and expenses 39
Photographer and prints 39
Press Prints 39
Total Advertising and PR 0.00 0.00

GENERAL ADMINISTRATION
Legal Fees 40
Accountancy 40
Insurance 41
Travel l i ng Expenses 42
Per diems/Hotels 42
Opening Night and Entertaining 43
Administration/offi ce costs 44
Total General Administration 0.00 0.00

MISC COSTS
Replacement Reserve 45
Preproduction costs 46
Total Misc. Running Costs 0.00 0.00

TOURING COSTS 47
Touring al l owance 48
Company travel 49
Cartage 50
Get in/out 51
Production crew hotels &
expenses
52
Total Touring Costs 0.00 0.00

TOTALS 53
Fees 0.00 0.00
Physical Production 0.00 0.00
Salaries 0.00 0.00
Theatre Costs 0.00 0.00
Rehearsal Costs 0.00 0.00
Advertising & PR 0.00 0.00
General Admi nistration 0.00 0.00
Misc. Costs 0.00 0.00
Touring costs 0.00 0.00
TOTAL COSTS 0.00 0.00 54
Andrew Treagus

So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 4.3 (Page 1 of 4)
NOTES TO THE OUTLINE BUDGET

1. The Authors royalty. Any advance payment/s not recoupable against the royalty should
be included under Production.

2. The main Creative Team, usually paid fees for the production period and royalties
(fixed or percentage) during the run. Any additional advance payment/s not recoupable
against the royalties should be included under Production.

3. The Production Musical Director is part of the Creative Team and will receive a
production fee, but is unlikely to receive a royalty. The PMD may receive a weekly fee
during the run for supervision and may, additionally, take the role of Musical Director,
in which case he or she will continue to be paid weekly under salaries.

4. The Orchestral Manager or Fixer is paid on a weekly basis throughout the run. Some
fixers work on a fixed fee, others on a percentage of the Orchestras total weekly
salary.

5. A production fee to organize the initial casting and sometimes a weekly fee on
musicals.

6. A production figure to cover fees for all Creative Team assistants.

7. A weekly fee normally paid 2 weeks prior to rehearsal, throughout the rehearsal period,
the run of the production and for 2 weeks following the closure. Fees vary according to
the size of the production. Some Producers in addition pay themselves a royalty in the
same manner as the Creative Team. If an independent General Manager is employed,
the fee element will be shared by the Producer and General Manager.

8. A fee for the production period and, if it is a complicated technical production, a weekly
retainer for ongoing technical consultancy.

9. Production personnel, usually paid fees or may be paid on daily rates. Occasionally the
Costume Supervisor may be retained on a weekly retainer to deal with cast
replacement costumes and remakes.

10. The actual costs of manufacture and purchase of all the physical requirements of the
production.

11. Items of electrics and sound equipment purchased during the production period and
also during the run which are not covered in the hire agreements e.g. colour for
lanterns and batteries for radio mics.

12. The cost of all transportation during the production period of all the physical effects
including the cost of transport between workshops, rehearsal rooms and theatre.

13. The purchase or hire of those instruments (e.g. keyboards) not supplied by members of
the Orchestra.

14. Contractors labour charges for the installation of the set, lighting and sound during the
fit up.

Andrew Treagus
So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 4.3 (Page 2 of 4)

NOTES TO THE OUTLINE BUDGET


15. Weekly running hire for all equipment not purchased.

16. Performers salaries: rehearsal salaries are subject to the SOLT/Equity agreement;
weekly performing salaries are negotiated with individual Artists or their Agents
subject to SOLT/Equity minima.

17. Overtime should be expected and added; it nearly always applies during the technical
and dress rehearsal period.

18. Paid on a weekly basis. On smaller musicals the MD may well play an instrument
within the Orchestra.

19. Usually a member of the Orchestra paid an additional weekly sum to undertake this
additional responsibility.

20. Most commonly, keyboard players specifically used during the rehearsal period, paid
on a session, daily or weekly basis.

21. The weekly salaries of the Orchestra covers 8 performances per week. In the
production period the figure is calculated on the number of 3 hour calls required, 8
calls equal 1 weeks salary. Consult an experienced Fixer who will give clear guidelines
as to the expected costs. (subject to SOLT/MU minimums)

22. There are minimum SOLT/Equity agreed weekly salaries for Stage Management which
remain the same during rehearsal and the run. Many Producers offer a little above
the minimum for each grade.

23. Applicable only to large scale musicals and very technical straight plays when
specialist skills are required throughout the run.

24. Sound operators are not covered by any union agreement; their salaries are by
negotiation.

25. Covered by SOLT/BECTU agreed minimum rates.

26. Probably the Assistant Director, retained throughout the run to check quality control,
give notes, rehearse understudies and assist or rehearse cast replacements.

27. A member of the chorus/ensemble with the additional duty to maintain the standard
of choreography.

28. Add an additional percentage on all salaries to cover the employers share of N.I., the
employees holiday entitlements and employers contribution to pension fund.

29. Agreed by negotiation. Can be a fixed weekly sum, a percentage of the weekly net
box office receipts, a percentage of profits or any combination. Commonly, during the
get in, technical & dress rehearsals a reduced fixed fee, then until the recoupment of
the production costs a fixed weekly sum, after recoupment a percentage.
Andrew Treagus
So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 4.3 (Page 3 of 4)

NOTES TO THE OUTLINE BUDGET


30. An estimate of the Contra charges can be obtained from the Theatre. The contra
includes all staff costs (backstage and front of house), electricity and heating,
cleaning, rates, water rates, telephone charges, box office computer charges and
many miscellaneous charges, even toilet rolls.

31. The cost of any additional staff taken on by the Theatre at the Producers request and
recharged to the Producer.

32. The cost of the permanent staff overtime and any extra staff required by the Producer
for the get in and fit up.

33. Include all costs related to casting, e.g. rooms/theatre hire, pianist, piano hire, travel
and Stage Management staff.

34. Hire of rooms for the rehearsal period.

35. Hire of equipment for rehearsals, e.g., piano, mirrors, rehearsal furniture, sound
equipment etc.

36. Typing and duplication of the script and copying and duplication of the musical score.

37. Teas/coffees, stationery, telephone, parking, etc.

38. Fares and/or subsistence for those members of the company who live outside London.
(SOLT/Equity agreement)

39. Take advice on all these areas from a reputable advertising and marketing company.

40. Take advice on the levels of these fees from your professional advisors.

41. Take advice from an insurance broker who specializes in theatrical insurance.

42. To cover all fares, per diems and hotels for the management and creative team.

43. The opening night party and any other entertaining and first night gifts.

44. Any costs of the Producers or Managers office which are over and above the normal
costs of running the office, which directly relate to the production and can therefore
legitimately be recharged to the production.

45. A weekly sum of money reserved within the accounts to pay for the repair and
replacement of any of the physical properties. A reserved sum can also be used to
help pay for the cost of cast replacements.

46. Costs incurred by the Producer in the initial setting up the production and legitimately
rechargeable to the production.

47. Items under this sub heading are only applicable to touring.

Andrew Treagus

So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 4.3 (Page 4 of 4)

NOTES TO THE OUTLINE BUDGET


48. The touring allowance.( SOLT/Equity and SOLT/ MU).

49. Fares for Company and Staff between dates.

50. Transport of the physical production between dates.

51. Labour costs of getting in and out of each date.

52. Hotel rooms for the non-permanent fit up crew and artistic staff at each venue.

53. Under this sub heading are the sub totals for each sub heading.

54. The totals for each column.






























Andrew Treagus

So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 4.4 (Page 1 of 3)

CAPITALISATION, PROFIT & LOSS AND
RECOUPMENT


Having estimated the costs
of mounting and running
the production,
consideration must be
given to the capital sum
that will be required, taking
into account the following:-


a) The estimated production costs.
b) A contingency of say 10% of the production costs to allow
for any overspends.
c) A reserve of funds to cover any running losses that may
occur at any time during the run. Lack of such a reserve has
caused many producers to run into financial difficulties.
d) Sufficient funds to cover any deposits that the Theatre,
Equity and/or the MU may require.
e) Sufficient funds to meet the VAT elements on invoices
relating to the production for supplies or services and which
cannot be reclaimed timely from Customs & Excise (consult
your accountant).
f) Sufficient funds to cover any running invoices that may need
to be paid during the production period. Hire companies, for
example, give worthwhile reductions on their hire charges if
6 or more running weeks are paid in advance.
g) Sufficient funds to cover closure costs, if the production fails.

Most of the foregoing items, in particular d,e,f & g are a matter
of funding cash flow. Items a & b, together with item c, is the
total expenditure that has to be set against any Weekly Running
Profits in order to achieve Recoupment. Recoupment is normally
defined as The point in time when the Producers share of the
Net Box Office Income first equals the aggregate of the
Productions Costs plus the Weekly Running Costs to that date
less any weekly running losses to that date. Net Weekly
Running Profit is usually defined as The Producers share of the
Net Box Office Receipts less all Weekly Running Costs including
Royalties.

Up until the week in which recoupment takes place, all weekly
running profits that go towards recoupment are held in the
Producers bank account for the benefit of the Investors and are
then paid over to the Investors. Once recoupment has been
reached, investors are entitled to receive back the same sum of
money that each individually invested. Normally, repayment of
the whole investment would not be made until post recoupment
profits had built up a reserve to meet possible running losses or
cash flow needs.

In the event of a show having to close before recoupment takes
place, but when partial recoupment has taken place, each
Investor would receive only that percentage portion of the partial
recoupment money as that Investors percentage investment
bore to the total Capital.

Andrew Treagus

So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 4.4 (Page 2 of 3)

CAPITALISATION, PROFIT & LOSS AND
RECOUPMENT



Following Recoupment any aggregate of Weekly Running Profits
against any Weekly Running Losses is divided between the
Producer and the Investors, the usual ratio being 40% to the
Producer and 60% to the Investors. The 60% to the Investors
would be divided, each Investor receiving that percentage
portion of profit as that Investors percentage investment bore to
the total Capital.


Profit and Loss


An estimated profit/loss illustration can now be assembled. An
example is given overleaf with figures inserted as a guide to how
it works. The illustration is based on the following:-
A net box office potential of 120,000.00
Fixed Weekly Running costs of 55,000.00
Royalties of 15%
Showing a Weekly Running Profit
Assuming a Total Production Cost of 250,000.00
Showing the estimated number of weeks to Recoupment
(derived by dividing the Total Production Cost figure by the
Weekly Running Profit figure).
























Andrew Treagus
So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 4.5 (Page 1 of 2)

ROYALTY POOLS


Royalty pools are now more commonly being negotiated and in particular on musicals and
larger budget straight plays.

A common example of a royalty pool can be described as follows: instead of the Royalty being
calculated as a percentage of the net Box Office receipts, it is calculated as a proportion of the
Gross Weekly Running Profits, using the following guidelines:

a) The Gross Weekly Running Profit (Calculated by deducting from the weeks net box office
receipts all weekly running costs excluding royalties) is divided between the Royalty Pool
participants and the Producer/Investors in an agreed ratio. For example, 65% to the
Producer/Investors and 35% to the Royalty Pool. This split (65%/35%) would be part of
the negotiated agreement.
b) The Producer/Investors share (e.g. the 65% as above) becomes the Net Weekly Running
Profit and, prior to Recoupment, on a weekly basis, aggregates towards achieving
Recoupment. Following Recoupment the percentage division is normally adjusted (again by
negotiated agreement); for example the Producer/Investors share may reduce to 60% and
the Royalty Pool increase to 40%.
c) The Royalty Pool share (e.g. the 35% as above, or 40% following Recoupment) is divided
between all the Royalty Participants in the ratio of their individual Royalty to the total of the
Royalties to be paid. For example, if the total Royalties in a pool amounted to 15%, each
1% Royalty holder would receive 1 point within a total of 15 or 1/15
th
of the total Pool.
d) It is clear from a), b) and c) that in a week where there is little or no Gross Weekly Running
Profit, Royalty participants could share in a small or even non existent Pool. In order to
deal with this eventuality and to ensure some payment is made to royalty holders in poor
weeks, a minimum payment per point is normally negotiated, for example 200 per point or
a total of 3,000 for the 15 points illustrated.

The use of a Royalty Pool helps to protect the Producer if a show is playing to poor business
and effectively reduces the figure at which the show will start to show a loss on a weekly basis.

A profit/loss illustration based on a 65%/35% Pool arrangement is shown overleaf. The same
Box Office Figures and Fixed Weekly Operating Costs are used as for the previous profit /loss
illustration, but it will be clear that on the Pool arrangement the Producer is at less financial
risk of loss at the lower Box Office levels.












Andrew Treagus
So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 4.6 (Page 1 of 2)

ROYALTY REDUCTIONS, DEFERMENTS AND CAPS


A Producer may not be able to persuade an Author (or their agent) to work within a Royalty
Pool formula and almost certainly this will be the case with a small straight play. There are,
however, other methods, frequently used to help the Producer either to reach Recoupment
within a reasonable period of time or to assist the Producer to keep a show afloat during
periods of low Box Office income. These include:-


Caps

A royalty cap can be pre-negotiated (requiring the agreement of all
Royalty Participants) to allow the Producer only to pay Royalties up
to a specific level of Box Office income. For example, the theatre at
which the play is going to open may have a Net Box Office Potential
of 100,000 at capacity, but an agreement could be reached so that
the Royalty Participants will only be paid their royalties up to 70% of
that figure, so that if the Producer really got lucky and played in
excess of 70%, any box office income in excess of 70,000 would be
Royalty free thus hastening the point of Recoupment. Such an
agreement would only be until Recoupment is reached, at which
point the Cap would be removed and Royalties paid on the actual
Box Office figures.


Reductions and
Waivers

When shows run into trouble at the Box Office and fail to meet the
weekly running costs, the producer has three options:

1) Close the production.

2) Keep the show running and suffer the losses.

3) Reduce the costs and try to keep the show alive.

Option 3 is normally the first to be tried. So what reductions are
possible? Almost certainly the Producer will approach the theatre
and seek a reduction on the rent, and unless the theatre has another
show lined up to take over immediately, the owner will usually be
helpful. The other main area of possible saving is of course the
Royalties, and an approach at this stage to the Authors Agent will
generally elicit at least a temporary reduction. It is, after all, hardly
ever in the Authors best interest for the Producer to have to close
the production. The Author will expect that all Royalty Participants
accept the same formula for cuts and will always be more willing to
help if the theatre has been accommodating.

A waiver is the best kind of Royalty reduction and simply allows the
Producer to continue to run the play for a period paying little or no
Royalties at all. It would only be in extreme circumstances and with
a very understanding Author that such a waiver would last for long.

Andrew Treagus

So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 4.6 (Page 2 of 2)

ROYALTY REDUCTIONS, DEFERMENTS AND CAPS


Deferments

Often the basis on which an Authors Agent will accept a Royalty cut
or waiver is that should the play get through the poor Box Office
period and start to make a weekly profit paying normal Royalties,
then any Royalties that have been reduced or deferred should start
to be paid back to the Royalty Participants over a period of time.
This is called Deferment and may be the price the Producer has to
pay to get help when it is most needed. Take care, however, as
Deferments over a long period can build up and make any possibility
of future weekly profits very remote.


Part of a Producers skill must be to negotiate areas of possible savings
when a production fails to sufficiently attract and, of course, to get the best
possible production values within a finite budget. Producers now rarely
open cold in the West End. Shows tend to open in the Provinces where good
financial deals can be struck to reduce the Capital at risk. But while the risk
is always present, if the Producer has done his/her homework diligently and
has got his/her sums right, the risk is properly assessed, managed and
minimised.

























Andrew Treagus


Sponsored by Walton & Parkinson Ltd, insurance brokers to the theatre industry.
Tel: 0845 218 4140. Email: enquiry@waltonandparkinson.co.uk.
So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 5.1 (Page 1 of 2)

KEY POINTS TO CONSIDER IN RAISING FINANCE
FSMA Registration or Debenture Route?


Introduction

Often, one of the biggest headaches facing a producer is how
to obtain sufficient funds for a new production, and most are
on the look-out for opportunities to attract investment.
However, there are important considerations to be taken on
board when approaching potential new investors, large or
small.


The Financial Services &
Markets Act 2000

It is vital to remember that theatre producers seeking any form
of investment in a production are subject to the restrictions
imposed by the Financial Services & Markets Act 2000 (the
FSMA), which regulates capital raising (amongst other things)
in all areas of business. Under the FSMA there are strict
requirements relating to how investment is invited and
obtained.


A WARNING!!

You should never advertise for or solicit investment in any way,
whether by writing to people directly, in the press, through a
website or otherwise unless you have been professionally
advised that the requirements of the FSMA are satisfied. Any
investment agreement resulting from such an approach
contravenes the FSMA, is invalid, and the investor may be
entitled to repayment of the investment in full, plus
compensation for any losses suffered, regardless of the
circumstances. You may also be committing a criminal offence.


Preparing an investment
proposal

Before a producer circulates any investment proposal, it is
essential that professional advice is taken regarding its content
and how it may be distributed. In general terms, any invitation
to invest must contain warnings as to the risk of losing funds,
but there are also more specific requirements which a solicitor
or accountant will be able to clarify. Any document inviting
investment issued by a body or person not appropriately
registered under the FSMA must be approved prior to
circulation by a person authorised under the FSMA for this
purpose, for example a solicitor or an organisation regulated by
the Financial Services Authority.


The Debenture Route

Whilst a number of producers have set up their own financial
services companies which are registered under the Act so as to
be authorised to conduct certain types of investment business,
others have followed what has come to be known as the
debenture route.

Cont ....
Sponsored by Walton & Parkinson Ltd, insurance brokers to the theatre industry.
Tel: 0845 218 4140. Email: enquiry@waltonandparkinson.co.uk.

So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 5.1 (Page 2 of 2)

KEY POINTS TO CONSIDER IN RAISING FINANCE
FSMA Registration or Debenture Route?


The Debenture Route

The central idea is that a producer circulates a document
detailing the production costs, and often background
information on the production, and asking investors for
investment, which will technically be treated as a loan of funds.
Repayment of the loan is contingent upon sufficient funds
being available each week after the payment of that weeks
running costs and if the production recoups a return is then
paid by way of distribution of production profits.

This form of loan repayable on a contingency might technically
be termed a limited recourse debenture, hence the term
debenture route. The advantage of this process is that the
producer is spared the not inconsiderable cost of complying
with the registration requirements laid down in the FSMA.
However, It is vital to note that there are restrictions as to the
categories of people to whom the approved document may be
sent. Individuals who have expressed a particular interest in
making an investment, such as those on the Angels list (see
below) may be contacted. However, cold-calling or
unsolicited mailing to members of the public is unlawful.
Professional advice should be taken at every stage.

Until recently the legality of the debenture route had been
uncertain however both the Treasury and the Financial Services
Authority have now acknowledged that this is a valid way to
raise production finance. However, this does not remove the
need to seek professional advice.


The Angels List

SOLT holds details of members of the public who have
expressed an interest in investing in theatrical productions
(known as Angels), and SOLT members are able to send
copies of an approved document to those on the list. NB -
The Angels List is only accessible to SOLT members.


Sponsored by Walton & Parkinson Ltd, insurance brokers to the theatre industry.
Tel: 0845 218 4140. Email: enquiry@waltonandparkinson.co.uk.
So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 5.2 (Page 1 of 2)

COVER YOURSELF: INSURANCE HINTS


Prepared by Walton & Parkinson Limited
Insurance Brokers
20 St Dunstans Hill
London EC3R 8PP
Tel: 0845 218 4140
Fax: 0845 218 4141
Email: enquiry@waltonandparkinson.co.uk


Introduction

Theatrical productions need to have some insurance by law and
quite a bit more through prudence. Benjamin Franklin said that
in this world nothing can be said to be certain, except death
and taxes and it is true that only rarely can future events be
predicted with absolute confidence. It is therefore vital to try
to avoid, or at least to minimise, the unpleasant results of the
unexpected.


Types of Insurance Policies
for theatrical productions

Insurance policies fall into four basic categories:-

Covering physical effects for loss or damage
Covering third party liabilities: injury to persons or damage
to property
Covering business interruption or cancellation of one or
more performances
Covering personnel: either as key people to a production in
which their non-appearance would force its cancellation, or
for those involved in hazardous work, or because they are
travelling abroad.

Each of the four types of insurance can be broken down into
sub-divisions specifically referring to the type of work you will
be undertaking.


Loss or Damage

Insuring against loss or damage to physical assets in the case
of a drama or musical would cover sets, props, costumes,
lighting and sound equipment, musical instruments, skips, wig
blocks and all other production material including front of house
photographs etc. All such items need insurance protection
against loss or damage all the time whilst they are your
responsibility; including when in transit, when in use or when in
temporary storage.

Money should also be insured against loss.

Walton & Parkinson Ltd
Sponsored by Walton & Parkinson Ltd, insurance brokers to the theatre industry.
Tel: 0845 218 4140. Email: enquiry@waltonandparkinson.co.uk.
So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 5.2 (Page 2 of 2)

COVER YOURSELF: INSURANCE HINTS


Employers Liability and
Public Liability

Every employer is required by UK law to have Employers
Liability Insurance, which provides up to 10 million indemnity
for any employee who suffers a work-related accident or illness.

A minimum of 2 million indemnity is recommended by insurers
for Public Liability claims involving injury to other persons or
damage to third party property caused by the negligence of the
Insured.


Business Interruption or
Cancellation of an Event

There could be loss or damage to the theatre, sets or
equipment, or one or more of the cast might fall ill or have an
accident. If a tour is cancelled then you might well suffer loss
of fare monies and transportation costs as well.


Personnel

For those involved in hazardous or potentially hazardous work
during performance or fit-up, Equity requires that producers
take out appropriate insurance for death, loss of limbs, eyes
etc. and permanent total disablement for a sum of not less than
30,000 and weekly benefits for temporary total disablement
relating to between 75% and 100% of the individuals normal
earnings.

If travelling abroad, you have to take out Travel Insurance
involving temporary Life Insurance, Medical Insurance, Personal
Effects and subsistence costs if the casts return is delayed.


Costs

The cost of the relevant insurance for your particular
production depends upon numerous factors such as
reinstatement values of physical assets, the payroll, the likely
costs and commitments in the event of a cancellation, the age
and health record of artists and sometimes the nature of the
work involved. Invariably, the cost of the insurance amortized
over the period of the production is often one of the smallest
elements of the budget.

It would appear that few insurance companies have much
experience of theatre, so it is advisable to use a specialist
broker who will be able to assess your needs and provide
quotations for cover with a proper understanding of what your
production involves. It is the insurance brokers role to
evaluate the risk factors and match the risks involved with the
appropriate insurance - bought at the best price commensurate
with breadth of cover and the security of the insurer, coupled
with their concern to settle claims fairly and promptly.

Walton & Parkinson Ltd

Sponsored by Walton & Parkinson Ltd, insurance brokers to the theatre industry.
Tel: 0845 218 4140. Email: enquiry@waltonandparkinson.co.uk.
So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 5.3 (Page 1 of 1)

MARKETING AND ADVERTISING
PUBLICITY AND PRESS REPRESENTATIVES


Marketing and
Advertising

The marketing and advertising of a production are so dependent on the
particular circumstances of each production that it is impractical to generalise
here. The best way for new producers to find out about this is to approach
the experienced theatre practitioners in the field and ask them to make a
proposal for the production.

It is not always necessary to have the advertising and marketing with the
same company. However, on smaller productions such as plays, some
companies may not be prepared to just take on one or the other as their
margins may be too tight. Also the producers costs will probably be
increased if they use separate companies for marketing and advertising. In
any event it is advisable to go to those who are experienced in theatre
marketing and advertising.


The principal
practitioners are:-


AKA
First Floor, 115 Shaftesbury Avenue, London WC2H 8AF
020 7836 4747
http://www.akauk.com

Dewynters plc
48 Leicester Square, London WC2H 7QD
020 7321 0488
http://www.dewynters.com

A full list can be found in Contacts or in theatre programmes for productions,
which usually credit advertising and marketing companies working on the
production.

It is usual to pay an up-front marketing fee, plus a weekly fee. There may
also be a design or concept fee. Agencies receive an inside commission
for advertising space booked and the producer will only have to pay for the
artwork.


Publicity and Press
Representatives


It is essential to use a Publicity and Press Representative who is experienced
in theatre productions. As with advertising and marketing, producers are best
advised to meet with a few practitioners and ask them for their proposals. It
is usual to pay an up-front fee plus a weekly retainer for as long as the
production runs. Expenses are also payable, including the cost of press
releases, postage, photos etc. A full list of Publicity and Press Representatives
can be found in Contacts.

Stage One




So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 5.6 (Page 1 of 1)

BURSARIES FOR NEW PRODUCERS



Stage One gratefully thanks the following who have supported the Fund with
their generous donations:






Clear Channel Entertainment
The Department of National Heritage
The Foundation for Sport and the Arts
The Harold Hyam Wingate Foundation
The Mackintosh Foundation
Mamma Mia!
The Musicians Union
The Patrick Trust
The Rayne Foundation
The Society of London Theatre
The Theatrical Management Association
The Underwood Trust
Andrew Treagus Associates



and the many others who have contributed over the years.







Stage One is the operating name of the Theatre Investment Fund Ltd, a company limited by
guarantee registered in England No. 1252595
Charity Reg. No. 271349
Registered office: 32 Rose Street, London, WC2E 9ET.







Stage One

Sponsored by Walton & Parkinson Ltd, leading insurance brokers to the theatre industry.
Tel: 0845 218 4140. Email: enquiry@waltonandparkinson.co.uk.
So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 5.4 (Page 1 of 1)

STAGE ONE


Stage One was founded in 1976 (as The Theatre Investment Fund) with the aim of supporting and
encouraging new producers in the commercial theatre. It is a non-profit distributing organisation with
charitable status and is run by a Council that consists of many of the major theatre owners, managers and
producers in the UK, all of whom are committed to nurturing new talent and sustaining the future of
quality theatre in this country.

Stage One fulfils a crucial role at the very heart of the commercial theatre industry. In today's tough
financial environment, there are increasingly fewer new producers equipped to face the daunting task of
raising investment for a theatre production, which also means fewer new playwrights are given that critical
first chance to have their work presented to an audience. These new producers are the future lifeblood of
the industry; without them theatre in the UK will stagnate and ultimately decline. Stage Ones role is to
reverse this trend and help sustain healthy and profitable commercial theatre across the country. To this
end Stage One assists promising new producers by running workshops led by experienced professionals,
by producing a guide for new producers, So, You Wanna Be A Producer?!, and by providing a free
information and advice service for those presenting productions.

Stage One, in association with SOLT, also runs a Bursary scheme for New Producers which is co-financed
by SOLT and sponsored by FIFA (Federation Internationale des Football Associations), in association with
MAMMA MIA! and Arts Council England, and supported by the Mackintosh Foundation, the Wingate
Foundation and Clear Channel Entertainment. The Bursaries are intended to support individuals in
progressing their careers as commercial theatre producers and recipients are able to use the Bursary to
develop and/or present new productions. In addition the scheme also provides the benefit of an
established industry figure as a mentor.

Stage One also makes modest investments in new productions, both in London and nationally, that meet
its investment conditions. Returns made from Stage Ones investments are paid back and reinvested in
new productions.

In order to secure its long-term survival Stage One has set up an Endowment Fund, the capital of which is
invested in perpetuity so that the income can be used to finance Stage Ones investments in productions
and educational activities.


Recent Investments

Some recent productions in London and the regions which have received
support:


And Then There Were None
Anything Goes
As You Desire Me
As You Like It
Donkeys Years
Ducktastic
Edward Scissorhands
Epitaph for George Dillon
Evita
Footloose
Hedda Gabler
Heroes
High Society
Honour
Jane Eyre
Mary Stuart
My Name Is Rachel Corrie
Otherwise Engaged
Pete And Dud Come Again
Reduced Shakespeare Company:
Complete Hollywood (abridged)
Shoot The Crow
Sinatra At The London Palladium
Steptoe & Son
Sunday In The Park With George
Telstar
The Postman Always Rings Twice
Trainspotting
Stage One

Sponsored by Walton & Parkinson Ltd, leading insurance brokers to the theatre industry.
Tel: 0845 218 4140. Email: enquiry@waltonandparkinson.co.uk.
So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 5.5 (Page 1 of 1)

STAGE ONE
Council and Officers


Patrons

LORD ATTENBOROUGH, CBE
DAME JUDI DENCH, CBE
SIR RICHARD EYRE, CBE
MICHAEL GRADE, CBE
SIR CAMERON MACKINTOSH
DAME MAGGIE SMITH, CBE
STEPHEN SONDHEIM
JOHN WHITNEY


Members of the
Council

DAVID DEIN (Chairman)
PAUL ELLIOTT (Vice-Chair)

GEORGE BIGGS RICHARD PULFORD
NICA BURNS RUPERT RHYMES, OBE
MICHAEL HARRISON GREG RIPLEY-DUGGAN
THELMA HOLT, CBE MARK RUBINSTEIN
RICHARD JOHNSTON ROSEMARY SQUIRE
SIR EDDIE KULUKUNDIS, OBE ANDREW TREAGUS
DEREK NICHOLLS SIR STEPHEN WALEY-COHEN, BT
ANDR PTASZYNSKI MAX WEITZENHOFFER (USA)
CARO NEWLING PETER WILSON, MBE

All members of the Council are also members of the Company.


Chief Executive

Financial Controller &
Company Secretary

Administrator


NICK SALMON

MARTIN SCOTT


NATASHA OCKRENT


Auditor


HALPERNS HAINES AND WATTS

Offices

32 Rose Street Tel: 020 7557 6737
London
WC2E 9ET Fax: 020 7557 6799


Stage One is the operating name of the Theatre Investment Fund Ltd, a company limited by guarantee
registered in England No. 1252595
Charity Reg. No. 271349
Registered office: 32 Rose Street, London, WC2E 9ET


Stage One

So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 5.7 (Page 1 of 2)
SOME PROFESSIONAL ADVISERS
(This list is not comprehensive - for others see British Theatre Directory)
SOLICITORS
Campbell Hooper
35 Old Queen Street
London SW1H 9JD
Tel: 020 7222 9070
www.campbellhooper.com

Clintons
55 Drury Lane
London WC2B 5SQ
Tel: 020 7379 6080

Davenport Lyons
1 Old Burlington Street
London W1S 3NL
Tel: 020 7468 2600
www.davenportlyons.com

Denton Wilde Sapte
5 Chancery Lane, Cliffords Inn
London EC4A 1BU
Tel: 020 7242 1212
www.dentonwildesapte.com

Goodman Derrick
20 Fetter Lane
London EC4A 1PT
Tel: 020 7404 0606
www.goodmanderrick.com

Harbottle & Lewis
Hanover House, 14 Hanover Square
London W1R 0BE
Tel: 020 7667 5000
www.harbottle.com
Mishcon De Reya
Summit House, 12 Red Lion Square
London WC1R 4QD
Tel: 020 7440 7000
www.mishcon.co.uk

Olswang
90 High Holborn
London WC1V 6XX
Tel: 020 7067 3000
www.olswang.com

Russell-Cooke
8 Bedford Row
London WC1R 4BX
Tel: 020 7405 6566
www.russell-cooke.co.uk

Barry Shaw
13 Blackheath Village
London SE3 9LA
Tel: 020 8297 8899

The Simkins Partnership
45-51 Whitfield Street
London W1T 4HB
Tel: 020 7907 3000
www.simkins.com

Tarlo Lyons
Watchmaker Court, 33 St. John's Lane
London EC1M 4DB
Tel: 020 7405 2000
www.tarlolyons.com
ACCOUNTANTS
Baker Tilly
2 Bloomsbury Street
London WC1B 3ST
Tel: 020 7413 5100
www.bakertilly.co.uk

Blinkhorns
27 Mortimer Street
London W1T 3BL
Tel: 020 7636 3702
www.blinkhorns.co.uk

Breckman & Company
49 South Molton Street
London W1K 5LH
Tel: 020 7499 2292

Buzzacotts
12 New Fetter Lane
London EC4A 1AG
Tel: 020 7556 1200
www.buzzacott.co.uk

Jon Catty & Co.
118-120 Wardour Street
London W1F 0TU
Tel: 020 7439 9078

Collins & Company
Second Floor, 116 College Road
Harrow, Middx HA1 1BQ
Tel: 020 8427 1888

Halperns
25-31 Tavistock Place
London WC1H 0XF
Tel: 020 7391 4500

Nyman Libson Paul
Regina House, 124 Finchley Road
London NW3 5JS
Tel: 020 7433 2400
www.nymanlibsonpaul.co.uk

So, you wanna be a Producer?! Section 5.7 (Page 2 of 2)

SOME PROFESSIONAL ADVISERS
(This list is not comprehensive - for others see British Theatre Directory)

INSURANCE BROKERS

Gordon & Co.
2 Sekforde Court
217 St Johns Street
London EC1R 4LY
Tel: 020 7251 2255

Opus Insurance Services Ltd
97-99 West Regent Street
Glasgow G2 2BA
Scotland
Tel: 0141 333 3907
www.opuscompany.com


Walton & Parkinson Ltd
20 St Dunstans Hill
London
EC3R 8PP
Tel. 020 7929 4747
USEFUL PUBLICATIONS

Box Office Data Report
The Society of London Theatre
32 Rose Street
Covent Garden
London WC2E 9ET
Tel: 020 7557 6700
www.officiallondontheatre.co.uk

British Performing Arts Yearbook
Rhinegold Publishing
241 Shaftesbury Avenue
London WC2H 8TF
Tel: 020 7333 1721
www.rhinegold.co.uk

British Theatre Directory
Richmond House Publishing
3 Richmond Buildings
London W1D 3HE
Tel: 020 7224 9666
www.britishtheatredirectory.co.uk

Complete Guide to Londons West End Theatres
(1994)
The Society of London Theatre
- address as above -


Contacts
Spotlight Publications
7 Leicester Place
London WC2H 7RG
Tel: 020 7437 7631
www.spotlightcd.com

Disabled Access Guide to Londons West End
Theatres
The Society of London Theatre
- address as above -

The Spotlight
Spotlight Publications
- address as above -

The Theatre List
The Society of London Theatre
- address as above -

West End Theatre Audience Report
The Society of London Theatre
- address as above -

The Wyndham Report (1998)
The Society of London Theatre
- address as above -







Stage One