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DAR ES SALAAM INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING


BACHELOR IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
(NTA LEVEL 8)
SENIOR PROJECT 2

PROJECT TITTLE: FEASIBILITY STUDY OF


ELECTRIFYING MBAHE VILLAGE

PROJECT TYPE:

CASE STUDY

NAME:

ALFRED .P. MTUI

ADMISSION NO:

110343238385

SUPERVISER:

DR.A. KILIMO

YEAR OF STUDY: 2013/2014


2014, MARCH
i

DECLARATION
I, ALFRED. P .MTUI, declare that ,to the best of my knowledge the project presented here as a
part of the fulfillment for the award of Bachelor Of Engineering is a work of my origin .All
references used from books ,articles,reports,papers etc in preparation of this project have their
sources acknowledged in the reference list.

Signature..
Alfred. P. Mtui
May, 2014

Supervised by
Signature
Dr. A. Kilimo
May, 2014

ii

DEDICATION
I dedicate this project to my lovely parents, Mr. and Mrs. Pius Mtui, to my beloved sisters Flavia.
P. Mtui, Fides. P.Mtui and Glory. P.Mtui and my beloved brothers Lodigard.P.Mtui and
Innocent. Mtui, who were always in front way to give me support, Also I dedicate this to all my
friends.

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ABSTRACT
Mbahe village is located in Moshi Rural District 60 kM from MOSHI town in Kilimanjaro
region. Peoples living in this area have no access to electricity. It is about 4kM from the place
where an 11kV high tension line pass through to Kilimanjaro National Park (KINAPA).This
village experiences underdevelopment and low economy. So my plan is to perform a case study
for the possibility to electrify. Mbahe village by checking whether an 11kV line is viable to
supply the load of the village and if not the line will be upgraded to fulfill the load requirements
of the village.

iv

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
I would like to express my gratitude thanks to my Supervisor Dr .A. Kilimo of Electrical
Engineering Department for his valuable guidance during the planning and implementing of this
project.
My deep appreciation goes to all staff members of Electrical Engineering Department for their
assistance towards making this project as successful one.
Im very grateful to my parents Mr. and Mrs. Pius. Mtui, my beloved sisters Flavia, Fides and
Glory. P. Mtui and my young brothers Lodigard and Innocent. P. Mtui for their support and
encouragement throughout my study period. Also I express my special thanks to my fellow
students and those who support me to accomplish this project.
Above all, thanks GOD for giving me life, strength and energy.

TABLE OF CONTENTS
DECLARATION .......................................................................................................................................... ii
DEDICATION ............................................................................................................................................. iii
ABSTRACT................................................................................................................................................. iv
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT ............................................................................................................................ v
TABLE OF CONTENTS ............................................................................................................................. vi
LIST OF TABLES ..................................................................................................................................... viii
ABBREVIATIONS ..................................................................................................................................... ix
CHAPTER ONE ........................................................................................................................................... 1
INTRODUCTION ........................................................................................................................................ 1
1.1: BACKGROUND ............................................................................................................................... 1
1.2: PROBLEM STATEMENT ................................................................................................................ 1
1.3: PROJECT OBJECTIVES .................................................................................................................. 1
1.3.1: MAIN OBJECTIVE................................................................................................................... 1
1.3.2. SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES ........................................................................................................... 2
1.4: SIGNIFICANCE OF THE PROJECT .............................................................................................. 2
1.5: PROJECT METHODOLOGY........................................................................................................... 2
CHAPTER TWO .......................................................................................................................................... 3
LITERATURE REVIEW ............................................................................................................................. 3
2.1.1. DIFFERENT TYPES OF LOAD ................................................................................................ 3
2.1.3. LOAD FORECAST. ................................................................................................................... 5
2.1.4. LOAD SURVEY METHODS .................................................................................................... 5
2.1.6. BALANCING OF PHASES ....................................................................................................... 7
2.1.7. PLANNING ................................................................................................................................ 8
2.1.8. TYPES OF CABLES AND MATERIALS .................................................................................. 10
2.1.9. OVERHEAD LINE CONDUCTOR AND SPECIFICATIONS .................................................. 10
2.2.1. CONDUCTOR SELECTION ....................................................................................................... 11
2.2.2. VOLTAGE REGULATION ....................................................................................................... 12
CHAPTER THREE .................................................................................................................................... 13
DATA COLLECTION ............................................................................................................................... 13
CHAPTER FOUR....................................................................................................................................... 14
vi

DATA ANALYSIS ..................................................................................................................................... 14


4.1.1. Calculation of Substations capacity. ............................................................................................. 14
4.1.2. SELECTION OF TRANSFORMERS .......................................................................................... 15
4.1.3. PROPOSED ELECTRIFICATION MAP OF MBAHE VILLAGE ............................................. 16
4.1.4. COST ESTIMATES FOR CONSTRUCTION OF A 11KV HT LINE TO PROSPECTIVE ...... 17
4.1.5.COST ESTIMATES FOR ESTABLISHMENT OF POLE MOUNTED 315 kVA,11/0.4/0.23kV
................................................................................................................................................................ 18
4.1.6.COST ESTIMATES FOR CONSTRUCTION OF LT LINE TO SUPPLY POWER TO M/S
EXACT LINE AT MBAHE RC CHURCH AREA ................................................................................ 21
4.1.7.TOTAL COST TO FUND THE PROJECT .................................................................................. 23
CHAPTER FIVE ........................................................................................................................................ 24
CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATIONS ........................................................................................ 24
5.1: CONCLUSION ................................................................................................................................ 24
5.2: RECOMMENDATION ................................................................................................................... 24
APPENDIX A: WORK SCHEDULE ......................................................................................................... 25
REFERENCES ........................................................................................................................................... 26

vii

LIST OF TABLES
Table 1: Load Consumption.......................................................................................................................... 5
Table 2: TANESCO Electricity Charges ...................................................................................................... 8
Table 3: Tariffs ............................................................................................................................................. 9
Table 4: Load evaluation for assessed prospective customers .................................................................... 15
Table 5: Cost estimates for construction of 11kV HT line to prospective customers ................................. 17
Table 7:Cost estimates for construction of LT line to supply power to M/S exact line at Mbahe RC
Church area ................................................................................................................................................. 21
Table 8: Total cost to fund the project ........................................................................................................ 23

viii

ABBREVIATIONS
KINAPA-Kilimanjaro National Park.
HT -High-tension.
TANESCO-Tanzania National Electricity Supply Company.
ERA-Electrical Research Association.
DF-Diversity factor
PTR- Proposed transformers.
LT Low tension line

ix

CHAPTER ONE
INTRODUCTION
1.1: BACKGROUND
Tanzania Electric Supply Company (TANESCO) is the utility company that deals with the
Generation, Transmission, Distribution and Sale of electrical energy in the Country. In Tanzania
only 15 percent of the countrys total populations of about43 million have access to electricity,
so the Company needs to do much effort to speed up the rate of electrification in the Country.
For TANESCO to electrify an area, the following conditions must be fulfilled.
1. The connected load of the area is substantial.
2. People living in the area are able to pay bills.
3. The infrastructure of that area allows construction of HT lines, establishment of substations
and the construction of three phase distribution lines.
4. There is high tension (HT) line nearby to an area to tap power for feeding that area, and also
the high tension (HT) line must be capable of supplying the new load.
1.2: PROBLEM STATEMENT
Mbahe village is located in Moshi Rural District 60 kM from MOSHI Town in Kilimanjaro
Region. People living in this area have no access to electricity. About 4 kM from Mbahe village
there is an 11kV high tension line passing to Kilimanjaro National Park (KINAPA).The Village
is underdeveloped and has low economy i.e. low income per person, however it satisfy the
conditions of the utility company for being electrified, as there is a large number of prospective
customers who needs electricity and also the infrastructures of that area allows construction of
high tension (HT) lines, establishment of Substations and construction of three phase distribution
lines and finally there is High tension line nearby for the Village to tap power and feed the area.
My plan is to perform a case study for the possibility to electrify Mbahe Village by using
Electrical power from TANESCO. This can only be confirmed by a case study.
1.3: PROJECT OBJECTIVES
1.3.1: MAIN OBJECTIVE
The main objective of this project is to establish the technical and economic viability of
Electrifying Mbahe Village.
1

1.3.2. SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES


A. To estimate the number of prospective customers who needs Electricity.
B. To estimate the expected load of the Village.
C. To design the proposed electrification map of the Area.
D. To estimate the Substations capacity.
1.4: SIGNIFICANCE OF THE PROJECT
I.
II.
III.

To speed up the rate of Electrification in the Country.


Improving the living standards of the people living in Mbahe village.
Help Schools, Hospitals, Churches, Commercial activities and other Social Services to
operate effectively and efficiently.

1.5: PROJECT METHODOLOGY


In implementing this project, the following activities have been undertaken.
1. Literature review.
2. Data Collection
3. Data analysis.
4. Design a proposed Electrification map.
5. Report Writing

CHAPTER TWO
LITERATURE REVIEW
New electrification is done in an area after the area is fully surveyed. It is necessary to find out
the load requirement of the area where electricity is to be supplied. This depends on these:
1. Nature of the area.
2. The population of the town or village under consideration.
3. The density of the population.
4. The standard of living of people in the locality.
5. Industrial development in the area.
The load requirements of an area can be forecasted by means of a load survey. For
standardization on a natural basis, the load survey and load development directorate of the
central water and power commissions in Tanzania have classified some of the loads to a certain
extent of the lines given in the last section. Some average can also be assumed for preliminary
prediction. (E .O.Taylor, G.A.Boal; 1996)
2.1.1. DIFFERENT TYPES OF LOAD
1. Residential or domestic load-This consist mainly of lights and fans, domestic appliances
such as heaters, electric iron, refrigerators, air conditioners for rooms, radio receivers, television
sets, electric cookers.
2. Commercial load-This consist mainly of lighting for shops, advertisements shops, fans and
electrical appliances used in commercial establishments-shops, restaurants, market places etc.
3. Industrial load-This type of load can be subdivided into sections depending on the power
range required.
4. Water supply-This load may be approximately estimated from the following data.
The requirements of water for rural area may be taken as 45 liters per day per person; for
semirural areas 70litres per day per person; and for urban areas, 90 liters per day per person.
3

These are minimum requirements. If municipalities can provide better facilities, the cases may be
surveyed and estimated individually. Duplicate dumping sets should be installed, and the spare
sets should always be ready for use because water supply is an essentially service and must be
available continuously without failure
5. Irrigation-The power requirements for this type of load is dependent on the number of

watering required for each kind of the crop, the area of the land to be irrigated, the nature of the
soil, the working hours and the gross head. The demand factor may be taken as 80% to 90% for
tube well irrigation and 50% to 60% for privately owned individually controlled pump sets .Date
applicable to loamy soil and crops requiring 4 to 5 watering per season. (Depshande.M.V, 1979)
2.1.2. LOAD ASSUMPTION
The salient feature in planning an electrical distribution system is to ensure that adequate supply
is available to meet the estimated load demand near future and more distant future. The most
difficult task is the estimation of the future load. In general approach there should short term
estimates, long term estimates and load forecasting (E.O.Taylor, G.A.Boal, 1966)
Short term estimates-The shortest possible term over which the load forecast should made is
the length of time required to construct and omission a reinforcement of the system occurs
during winter. Consequently no forecast covering a short period than one year can possibly serve
any purpose, for if there is adequate capacity at other seasons. Normally a 415V or 11kV
reinforcement scheme can be planned, constructed and put into operation within twelve months,
so as short term forecast of twelve months meets the minimum requirements.
Long term estimates-If for example, a reinforcement of an 11kVsystem is considered, the
minimum time concept of one year establishes the time by which the reinforcement must be
completed .Immediate economic consideration would then suggest that the minimum works
should be carried out in that reinforcement and the possible result of action on this line is that
within a year so further reinforcement will be necessary and the work already carried out
becomes either redundant or departs from ideal. If however the tentative sites of all the33/
11kVsubstations in say seven years time were known and the associated11kVsystems based on
those substations were designed now, an orderly plan would be achieved. If now reverting to the
short term load forecast, the existing system based is considered, the places which will be over
4

loaded within the next year and the appropriate part of it reinforced in accordance with the
minimum money is being spent at any time will result. Thus it can be seen that the minimum
forecast for the generation purposes of six or seven years can be used as the long term estimate
for an 11kVsystem .Long term 33kVsystem load forecasts would need to cover at least 10 years
ahead.
2.1.3. LOAD FORECAST.
Load forecasting is not an exact science and most such forecasting is done by studying trends or
history .A simple forecast of a future load in a small locality can be made if is known that a
specified number of houses are to be built on a vacant site. History shows that if there are more
than 50 houses in a group, the load to be met will vary between 1.5 and 7 kW per house,
depending on the degree of electrification and the type of house. A formula in common use for
estimating maximum demand is, After Diversity Maximum Demand (A.D.M.D) = (aN+8) kW.
Where a is a constant depending on the type of the property and the installed capacity and
N is the number of houses connected to distributor or a substation (E.O.Taylor, G.A.Boal, 1996)

Table 1: Load Consumption


POPULATION

CONNECTED LOAD/CONSUMER(W)

Below 2000

100

2000-5000

200

5000-10000

300

10000-20000

350

20000-50000

400

50000-100000

500

Small scale Industries

Up to 25kW

2.1.4. LOAD SURVEY METHODS


The area under consideration is visited and existing and future load requirements are forecast,
taking into account the needs for communities in the region and the factors which are likely to
increase the load demand of the area in the near future. The consumer groups are classified into
residential or domestic consumers, commercial consumers and industrial consumers.
Total maximum Demand =Load in KW times percentage Demand Factor.
5

Maximum Demand of the group=total maximum Demand / Group Diversity Factor.


The maximum Demands of all the groups are added to get total maximum demand of the station.
Capacity of the substation is given by total maximum demand of the station times assumed
power factor. Knowing capacity of the substation will help in determining the number of
substations needed and their capacities to supply the area in consideration.
2.1.5. DEFINITION OF TERMS
Connected load
It is the sum of continuous ratings of all the equipment connected to supply system
Maximum demand:
It is the greatest demand of load on the power station during a given period
Maximum demand is generally less than the connected load because all the consumers do not
switch on their connected load to the system at a time
The maximum demand determines the installed capacity of the station. The station must be
capable of meeting the maximum demand.
Demand factor:
It is the ratio of maximum demand on the power station to its connected load.
Average load;
The average of loads occurring on the power station in a given period (day or month or year) is
known as average load or average demand
Load Factor
Is the ratio of the average load over designated period of time to the peak load (maximum load)
in that period

.Load Factor plays an important part on the cost of generation per unit. The higher the Load
Factor the lesser will be the cost of generation per unit for the same maximum demand.
Capacity Factor (Also called Plant Factor)
Is the ratio of the average load on the plant for period of time considered to the aggregate rating
of all the generating equipment
Capacity factor and Load factor became identical when the peak load is equal to the capacity of
the station.
Plant use Factor (also called Utilization Factor) Is the ratio of the kWh generated to the
product of the capacity of the plant in kW and the number of hours the plant has been in actual
use.
Diversity factor
Is the ratio of the sum of the individual maximum demands of the system to the overall
maximum demand of the whole system
It is always greater than one. The diversity factor of a station should be as high as possible because the
station max demand depends on the diversity of that load. If the diversity factor increases, the maximum
demand of the station becomes less and consequently capital cost of the station will be reduced.

2.1.6. BALANCING OF PHASES


Its necessity and how is it useful
Balancing of phases means distribution of single phase lighting loads equally on the 3 phase 4
wire supply line conductors so that the line currents on all phases are more or less equal. The
difference in load will cause an out of balance current to flow through neutral wire.
Load forecast: To electrify an area you take consideration of the current load. If the load grows
after some years one of the following can be done:
1. Keep fixed number of substations while increasing their sizes.
2. Keep the same size of substation while increasing their numbers.
(E.O.Taylor, G.A.Boal ;)

2.1.7. PLANNING
When planning a new extension of a distribution system it is necessary to keep the following
main factors continuously in mind.
1. The regulation of voltage at the terminals of the consumers installations.
2. The sufficiency of the supply for the consumers present and future.
3. The cost of the supply both to the consumers and to the Electricity board.
The statutory requirement that the voltage at the consumers terminals should be maintained
within plus or minus six percent of the declared value must be adhered.
(E.O.Taylor, G.A, Boal; 1996)
Table 2: TANESCO Electricity Charges
Domestic low usage Tariff(D1)

This category covers domestic customers who


on average have a consumption pattern for
50kW
The 50kW are subsidized by company are not
subjected to rate up to283.4KWh.In this tariff
category, power is supplied at a low voltage
single phase (230V).

General usage Tariff (T1)

This segment is applicable for customers who


use power for general purposes including
residential, small commercial and light
industrial use, public lighting and billboards. In
this category the average consumption is more
283.4kW per meter reading period. Power is
given at low voltage single phase (230V) as
well as three phases (400V).

Law voltage maximum demand (MD) usage

Applicable for general use where power is

tariff (T2).

metered at 400V and average consumption is


8

more than 7500kWh per meter reading period


and demand does not exceed 500kVAper meter
reading period.
High voltage maximum demand (MD) usage

Applicable for general use where power is

tariff (T3).

metered at 11kV and above.

Table 3: Tariffs
Domestic

General

Low voltage High

law

usage(T1)

max(T2)

usage(D1)

Zanzibar

voltage
max(T2)

Low energy(0-50kWh)- Tshs 60.00


per kWh
High energy charge per

Tshs 273.00

kWh (above 50kWh)


Service charge per

3841.00

14223.00

14,233.00

14233.00

16,944.00

14,520.00

12,079.00

132.00

118.00

106.00

month
Demand charge per
kVA
Energy charge per kWh

221.00

Note: All the charges above exclude VAT and EWURA.


Note: Highest maximum demand rule
Billing demand (BD) is the higher of kVA maximum demand during the meter reading period
and 75% of the highest kVA maximum demand of the preceding 3 month, provided that during
the first year of operation the billing demand shall be the higher of the kVA maximum demand
during the meter reading period and 75% of the highest kVA maximum demand recorded
commencing from the month the consumer is connected.

2.1.8. TYPES OF CABLES AND MATERIALS


The following factors govern the design of power cables
i.

The cross-sectional area of the conductor chosen should be of optimum size


to carry the specified load current or short circuit short term current without
overheating and should be within the required limits for voltage drop

ii.

The insulation applied to the cable must be adequate for continuous


operation at the specified working voltage with a high degree of thermal
stability, safety and reliability.

iii.

All materials used in the construction must be carefully selected in order to


ensure a high level of chemical and physical stability throughout the life of
the cable in the selected environment.

iv.

The cable must be mechanically strong and sufficiently flexible to withstand


the re-drumming operations in the manufacturers work handling during
transport when the cable is installed by direct burial in trenches, pulled into
ducts or laid on cable racks.

v.

Adequate external mechanical and /or chemical protection must be applied


to the insulation and metal or outer sheathing to enable it to withstand the
required environmental service conditions.

2.1.9. OVERHEAD LINE CONDUCTOR AND SPECIFICATIONS


Introduction
Overhead lines are in essence air insulated cables suspended from insulated supports with a
power transfer capacity approximately proportional to the square of the line voltage .Overhead
lines are more economic than cable feeders.
For transmission of equivalent power at11Kv a cable feeder would cost some 5 times the cost of
transmission line, at 132kV 8 times and at 400kV 23 times.

10

Such comparison must however be treated in more depth ,since they must take into account
rights of way, clearance problems and planning permissions associated with the unsightly nature
of erecting bare conductors in rural and urban areas.
2.2.0. ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS
i.

Temperature

ii.

Humidity

iii.

Solar radiation

iv.

Rainfall

v.

Wind velocity

vi.

Altitude

vii.

Ice and snow

viii.

Atmospheric pollution

ix.

Soil characteristics

x.

Lighting

xi.

Seismic factor

xii.

General loadings.

2.2.1. CONDUCTOR SELECTION


The selection of the most appropriate conductor size at a particular voltage level must take into account
both technical and economic criteria as listed below

i.

The maximum power transfer capability must be in accordance with system requirements

ii.

The conductor cross-sectional area should be such as to minimize the initial capital cost
and the capitalized cost of losses

iii.

The conductor should conform to standard sizes already used elsewhere on the network
in order to minimize spares holdings and introduce a level of standardization

iv.

The conductor thermal capacity must be adequate

v.

The conductor diameter or bundle size must meet recognized international standards for
radio interference and corona discharge

vi.

The conductor must be suitable for the environmental conditions and conform to
constructional methods understood in the country involved

11

2.2.2. VOLTAGE REGULATION


When a transmission line is carrying current, there is a voltage drop in the line due to resistance
and inductance of the line. The result is that receiving end voltage (VR) of the line is generally
less than the sending end voltage (VS). This voltage drop (VS VR) in the line is expressed as a
percentage of receiving end voltage VR and is called voltage regulation. The difference in
voltage at the receiving end of a transmission line between conditions of no load and full load is
called Voltage regulation and is expressed as a percentage of the receiving end voltage.
Mathematically,
Percentage Voltage regulation =

100%

Obviously, it is desirable that the voltage regulation of a transmission line should be low i.e., the
Increase in load current should make very little difference in the receiving end voltage.
(V. K. Mehta, 2002)

12

CHAPTER THREE
DATA COLLECTION
Mbahe village is located 4 kM from the distribution line
Number of prospective customers are 612 arrived to as follows;
Residential single-phase customers =500.
Commercial single phase customers (shops, groceries, bars, schools), =102
Commercial three phase customers
Milling machines =4
Dispensaries =2
Wood workshops =2
Water supply Schemes =2
Types of people living in the area are:
1. Workers.
2. Business peoples.
3. Peasants.
Type of the area: unsurveyed area.

13

CHAPTER FOUR
DATA ANALYSIS

4.1.1. Calculation of Substations capacity.


(I)Number of single phase residential customers=602
Average power consumption each=1.2kW
Total power consumption=6021.2kW=722.4kW
(ii). Number of three phase commercial customers=10
Average power consumption each=6.4kW.
Total power consumption=106.4kW=64kW.
(iii)Total power consumption for all loads is given by:
Total power consumption of residential single phase+ Commercial three phase,
TOTAL=722.4kW+64kW=786.4kW
Substations capacity
Substations Capacity=Total power consumption/Assumed power factor.
=786.4kW/0.8
=983kVA
Including safety factor=1.2
Substations capacity=983kVA1.2
=1179.6kVA
Standard size of transformers available at TANESCO is
50kVA, 100kVA, 200kVA, 315kVA, 500kVA

14

4.1.2. SELECTION OF TRANSFORMERS


1. Mbahe RC church substation 315kVA
2. KKKT substation 315kVA
3. Makomu sec substation 315kVA
4. Mbahe primary school substation 315kVA
Length of HT line =3680m
Number of Transformers=4
Length of substation=3680/4=920m.
From the utility company, the standard length of HT line=70m
Number of poles=920m/70=13.4=14 poles.
Including two poles (one at the start and the other at the end) =16 poles.
Table 4: Load evaluation for assessed prospective customers
S/N

LIGHT

FAN

RADIO

COOKER

E.IRON

FRIDGE

W/ PUMP

MILLING

SUBTO

M/C

TAL

Rate

No

Rate

No

Rate

No

Rate

No

Rate

No

Rate

No

Rate

No

Rate

No

0.06

0.07

0.02

1.5

22.38

1.45

0.06

0.07

0.02

1.5

22.38

4.07

0.06

0.07

0.02

1.5

22.38

0.38

0.06

0.07

0.02

1.5

22.38

1.5

0.06

0.07

0.02

1.5

22.38

1.38

0.06

0.07

0.02

1.5

22.38

1.36

0.06

0.07

0.02

1.5

22.38

1.24

0.06

0.07

0.02

1.5

22.38

1.39

0.06

0.07

0.02

1.5

22.38

1.45

10

0.06

0.07

0.02

1.5

22.38

2.38

TOTAL

16.6

Average load

1.66

NOTE

15

Average load per consumer=total load/no of prospective customers

4.1.3. PROPOSED ELECTRIFICATION MAP OF MBAHE VILLAGE

16

4.1.4. COST ESTIMATES FOR CONSTRUCTION OF A 11KV HT LINE TO PROSPECTIVE


CUSTOMERS FROM KINAPA TO MBAHE PRIMARY SCHOOL IN MOSHI RURAL.
Table 5: Cost estimates for construction of 11kV HT line to prospective customers
MATERIALS DESCRITPION
TREATED WOODEN POLES
13M
100mm2 ACSR
CROSS ARMS
TWISTED TIE STRAPS
BOLTS & NUTS 10'' X 3/4''
BOLTS & NUTS 2'' X 3/4''
SECTION STRAPS
TENSION CLAMPS
DISC INSULATORS
HORIZONTAL PIN
INSULATORS
SQUARE CURVED WASHER
3/4''
STAY ROD 8'' X 3/4''
STAY INSULATOR
STAY WIRE 7/8
STAY BASE PLATE
PREF. GRIP DEAD END
PREF.GRIP POLE TOP MAKEOFF
PIG TAIL HOOK
3mm AL BINDING WIRE
SOCKET CLEVIS & TONGUE
HATARI/DANGER PLATES
BARBED WIRE
U-NAILS
2" NAILS
POLE CAPES
SUB TOTAL IN TSHS
ADD 10% MISCELANEOUS
CHARGES
SUB TOTAL IN TSHS
ADD 6% STORE UPLIFT

UNIT

QTY

PRICE

TOTAL

EA
MT
EA
EA
EA
EA
EA
EA
EA

16
2760
4
8
76
8
6
6
12

426,229.60
1,536.08
39,650.00
8,500.00
4,616.09
633.00
7,500.00
17,720.39
10,000.00

EA

36

7,000.00

252,000.00

EA
EA
EA
MT
EA
EA

76
4
4
48
4
12

450.00
18,500.00
1,600.00
2,308.25
20,046.00
3,041.00

34,200.00
74,000.00
6,400.00
110,796.00
80,184.00
36,492.00

EA
EA
ROLL
EA
EA
MT
KG
KG
EA

4
6
3
6
16
16
10
10
16

16,522.12
6,500.00
272.61
7,500.00
3,250.00
462.72
1,240.80
3,500.00
1,250.00

66,088.48
39,000.00
817.83
45,000.00
52,000.00
7,403.52
12,408.00
35,000.00
20,000.00
12,784,853.41

6,819,673.60
4,239,580.80
158,600.00
68,000.00
350,822.84
5,064.00
45,000.00
106,322.34
120,000.00

1,278,485.34
14,063,338.75
843,800.33
17

SUB TOTAL IN TSHS

LABOUR & SUPERVISION


MAINS ENGINEER
MAINS SUPERVISOR
MAINS FOREMAN
MAINS LINESMAN
SPECIAL TASKS EMPLOYEES
MAINS LORRY DRIVER
MAINS CAR DRIVER

14,907,139.08

STAFF

DAYS

RATE

1
1
1
4
8
1
1

2
5
5
5
5
5
5

10,100.00
8,400.00
7,100.00
5,600.00
5,769.00
5,600.00
5,600.00

SUB TOTAL IN TSHS


TRANSPORTATION
MAINS LORRY
SUPERVISOR CAR

TOTAL
20,200.00
42,000.00
35,500.00
112,000.00
230,760.00
28,000.00
28,000.00
496,460.00

KM

DAYS

RATE

TOTAL

2
2

5
5

2500
1250

25,000.00
12,500.00

SUB TOTAL IN TSHS

37,500.00

SUMMARY
MATERIAL COST
LABOUR & SUPERVISION
TRANSPORTATION COSTS
SUB TOTAL IN TSHS
ADD 10% OVERHEAD
CHARGES

14,907,139.08
496,460.00
37,500.00
15,441,099.08

GRAND TOTAL IN TSHS

16,985,208.98

1,544,109.91

4.1.5.COST ESTIMATES FOR ESTABLISHMENT OF POLE MOUNTED 315


kVA,11/0.4/0.23kV
SUBSTATION AT MBAHE RC CHURCH AREA
Table 6: Cost estimates for establishment of pole mounted
18

315kVA, 11/0.4/0.23kV substation.

MATERIALS DESCRITPION

UNIT

QTY

PRICE

TREATED WOODEN POLES


10m
CHANNEL IRONS 7'' X 4'' X 4''
BOLTS & NUTS 12'' X 3/4''

EA
EA
EA

1
4
6

268,675.00
39,650.00
4,616.09

EA

750.00

3,000.00

EA
EA
MT

4
15
3

450.00
6,500.00
4,500.00

1,800.00
97,500.00
13,500.00

SET
EA
MT

1
1
3

700,000.00
3,250.00
60,000.00

700,000.00
3,250.00
180,000.00

EA
SET
EA

20
2
1

2,421.92
1,000,000.00
1,250.00

MT

10

70,000.00

700,000.00

MT
EA
EA

10
6
6

70,000.00
7,500.00
7,500.00

700,000.00
45,000.00
45,000.00

EA

13,365,093.00

BOLTS & NUTS 2'' X 3/4''


SQUARE CURVED WASHER
3/4''
EARTH ROD Cu
HT FUSES 10A
DROPOUT
FUSES&ARRESTORS11Kv
HATARI/DANGER PLATES
PC CUT OUTS 400A
35mm2 Cu BARE
CUNDUCTOR(For Earthing)
35-70mm2 RAYCHEM
POLE CAPS
70mm2 X 3CORES
ARMOURED CABLE 11kV
70mm2 X 4CORES
ARMOURED CABLE 0.4kV
70mm2 CABLE LUGS
185mm2 CABLE LUGS
TRANSFORMER 315kVA
11/0.4/0.23kV

11kV

TOTAL

268,675.00
158,600.00
27,696.54

48,438.40
2,000,000.00
1,250.00

13,365,093.00

SUB TOTAL IN TSHS


ADD 10% MISCELANEOUS
CHARGES
SUB TOTAL IN TSHS
ADD 6% STORE UPLIFT

18,358,802.94

SUB TOTAL IN TSHS

21,406,364.23

LABOUR & SUPERVISION


MAINS SUPERVISOR
MAINS FOREMAN
MAINS LINESMAN

1,835,880.29
20,194,683.23
1,211,680.99

STAFF

DAYS

RATE

TOTAL

1
1
2

3
3
3

8,400.00
7,100.00
5,600.00

25,200.00
21,300.00
33,600.00

19

SPECIAL TASKS
EMPLOYEES
MAINS LORRY DRIVER

6
1

3
3

5,769.00
5,600.00

SUB TOTAL IN TSHS


TRANSPORTATION
MAINS LORRY

103,842.00
16,800.00
200,742.00

KM

DAYS

RATE

TOTAL

2,500.00

15,000.00

SUB TOTAL IN TSHS

15,000.00

SUMMARY
MATERIAL COST
LABOUR & SUPERVISION
TRANSPORTATION COSTS
SUB TOTAL IN TSHS
ADD 10% OVERHEAD
CHARGES

21,406,364.23
200,742.00
15,000.00
21,622,106.23

GRAND TOTAL IN TSHS

23,784,316.85

2,162,210.62

20

4.1.6.COST ESTIMATES FOR CONSTRUCTION OF LT LINE TO SUPPLY


POWER TO M/S EXACT LINE AT MBAHE RC CHURCH AREA

Table 7:Cost estimates for construction of


LT line to supply power to M/S exact line at
Mbahe RC Church area

MATERIALS DESCRITPION

UNIT

QTY

PRICE

TOTAL

TREATED WOODEN POLES 10m

EA

11

268,675.00

2,955,425.00

D-IRON C/W BOLTS & NUTS

EA

39,650.00

158,600.00

BOLTS & NUTS 8'' X 5/8''

EA

44

4,616.09

203,107.96

BOLTS & NUTS 10'' X 5/8''

EA

48

1,349.31

64,766.88

BOLTS & NUTS 2'' X 5/8''

EA

750.00

3,000.00

ROUND WASHER 5/8'

EA

450.00

1,800.00

SHACKLE INSULATORS

EA

15

6,500.00

97,500.00

base plate

EA

34,871.81

244,102.67

Stay insulator

EA

850.00

Stay wire

MT

70

2,308.23

161,576.10

Pref.grip pole Top make off

EA

16,522.12

115,654.84

Stay rod c/w adjustable and thimble square

21

5,950.00

Pref.grip Dead end

EA

21

6,884.21

SUB TOTAL IN TSHS

144,568.41
4,156,051.86

ADD 10% MISCELANEOUS CHARGES

415,605.19

SUB TOTAL IN TSHS

4,571,657.05

ADD 6% STORE UPLIFT

274,299.42

SUB TOTAL IN TSHS

4,845,956.47

LABOUR & SUPERVISION

STAFF

DAYS

RATE

TOTAL

MAINS SUPERVISOR

8,400.00

25,200.00

MAINS FOREMAN

7,100.00

21,300.00

MAINS LINESMAN

5,600.00

33,600.00

SPECIAL TASKS EMPLOYEES

5,769.00

103,842.00

MAINS LORRY DRIVER

5,600.00

16,800.00

SUB TOTAL IN TSHS

200,742.00

TRANSPORTATION
MAINS LORRY
SUB TOTAL IN TSHS

KM

DAYS

RATE

TOTAL

2,500.00

15,000.00
15,000.00

SUMMARY

MATERIAL COST

4,845,956.47

LABOUR & SUPERVISION

200,742.00

TRANSPORTATION COSTS
SUB TOTAL IN TSHS

15,000.00
5,061,698.47
22

ADD 10% OVERHEAD CHARGES

506,169.85

GRAND TOTAL IN TSHS

5,567,868.32

4.1.7.TOTAL COST TO FUND THE PROJECT


Table 8: Total cost to fund the project
S/N
1.0

COST
High tension lines

67,940,835.92

=16,985,208.984
2.0

High tension lines

166,242,207.4

=4,156,051.864
3.0

Substations

329,320,310.5

=23,784,316.84
Total cost due to fund the project

329,320,310.5

23

CHAPTER FIVE
CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATIONS
5.1: CONCLUSION
The project introduces about the feasibility study to electrify Mbahe Village, by performing a
case study for the possibility to check weather an 11kV high tension line passing to Kilimanjaro
National Park( KINAPA) is viable to supply the the load of the Village.
Since the proposed load obtained for the Village is 1,180kVA and the number of proposed
transformers obtained are four each of 315kVA, then according to the standards of the Utility
Company an 11kV high tension line is viable to supply the load of the village.

5.2: RECOMMENDATION
In Tanzania most of the rural areas are not electrified, due to this problem some of them miss
suitable development programs and other benefits associated with electricity such as Schools,
Hospitals, Churches, Commercial activities and other social services.
Therefore by electrifying Mbahe Village, the peoples standard of living will be improved in the
Village and other benefits associated with electricity such as Commercial banks and other
activities will be obtained. So by electrifying rural areas, the development of the Country will be
improved by improving personal economy.

24

APPENDIX A: WORK SCHEDULE


Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan

Selection of Project
Title

Title Defending

Literature Review
& Consultations

Data collection

Data Analysis

Report Writing

Submission of the
Report

25

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

REFERENCES
1) Baylis C.R, (2005)Transmission and Distribution of Electrical Engineering Manchester,
Antony Rewe Ltd.
2) Boal G.A, (19660)Electrical Power DistributionOpenshaw, Edward Arnold Ltd.
3) Depshande M.V, (1979)Elements of Electrical power station Design McGraw-Hill.
4) Woodruff L. F, (1986) Principles of Electric Power Transmission, John Wiley &Sons, Inc.
Second Edition.

26