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Safety Precautions

Things that can reduce


the risk of bleeding:
Be careful when handling sharp objects
Always carry a form of
identification with you, indicating you are taking an anticoagulant.
Other Notes

Once the body is wounded, blood starts to


clot at the site of bleeding. Blood clotting involves
complex processes which may lead to a risk of excessive bleeding or clots that block blood vessels. The
accumulation of blood in the artery, vein, or heart
may lead to a heart attack or stroke.
This brochure discusses the drug information needed to provide a better understanding of
the proper use of anticoagulants.
What are anticoagulants?

If you miss a dose of


your anticoagulant medication,
take it as soon as you remember to take it.

Anticoagulants are medications that reduce


blood clotting and prevent existing clots from aggregation. Also, it decreases the ability of the blood to
accumulate so that unnecessary blood clots will not
form.

Important signs of bleeding that


you need to report to or call
your healthcare provider:

Anticoagulants are most commonly prescribed for patients with or at risk of the following:

Bleeding that does not stop


within 5-10 minutes.

ANTI
COAGULANTS

Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT)


Pulmonary Embolism

Blood seen when coughing or


vomiting.

Atrial Fibrillation

Dark brown or red urine.

High or moderate risk of stroke

Red or Black stools

How much anticoagulant should I take?

Difficulty breathing at rest or


with mild activity, dizziness or
prolonged headaches.

The dosing of an anticoagulant varies in


every patient. The dosage depends on the results of
a blood test, the International normalized ratio (INR).
Refer to your healthcare provider to determine your
therapeutic range.

To maximize the safety and


efficacy of your medication,
it is recommended to consult What are the side effects of anticoagulants?
a pharmacist who can moniThe major side effect is bleeding. It may be in the form of:
tor and adjust your therapy.
Prolonged bleeding
A list of your current medication, including your medicaNose bleeds
tion history, will greatly help
Bruises
in the provision of appropriate and quality healthcare.
Bleeding gums

Group 5 4C-Pharmacy PH-INFO


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OTHER CONSIDERATIONS
* Take Warfarin exactly as prescribed.
* Talk to your doctor if you are pregnant
* Avoid activities or sports that can cause traumatic
injury
Always check with your doctor or pharmacist before
starting any new medications
* Do not take a double dose of Warfarin if you miss a
dose

WHEN TO CALL YOUR DOCTOR


* Major bleeding (cuts that wont stop after 10
minutes)
* Increased bruising
* Fever or chills that last for more than 1-2 days
NUTRITION
Vitamin K can play a significant role in
affecting

ANTICOAGULANTS AND MEDICINE


There are many medicines that can interact with anticoagulants.
Some medicines can increase the effect of anticoagulants, thus increasing
the chances of bleeding. Some medications can decrease the effect of anticoagulants, thus increasing the chances of blood clots.
Over the counter pain relievers that can also increase the effect of anticoagulants, thus increasing the chance of bleeding include:
Aspirin
Advil, Motrin, Nuprin (ibuprofen)
Aleve (naproxen)

Other medications that increase the effect of anticoagulants,


thus increasing the chance of bleeding:
Allopurinol
Ciprofloxacin
Anabolic steroids
Clofibrate
Aspirin
Clopidogrel
Amiodarone
Diclofenac
Capecitabine
Disulfiram
Cephalosporins
Erythromycin
Cimetidine
Fluconazole
Anticoagulants and Alcohol
Food and alcohol may change the way anticoagulants affect your body.
Limit the amount of alcohol you drink.

your INR. An excess of foods high in Vitamin K


could have an effect on your anticoagulation:
Limit to 1 serving per day (1 cup or cup
cooked):
Spinach Turnip greens Cucumber peel
Broccoli Mustard greens Brussels sprouts
Cabbage Green scallion
Avoid eating parsley, kale, seaweed, and
green tea.

Medications that decrease the effect of anticoagulants, thus increasing the


chance
of blood clots:
Azathoprine
Haloperidol
Antithyroid medication
Nafcilllin
Carbamazepine
Oral contraceptives
Dicloxacillin
Phenobarbital
Glutethimide
Rifampin
Griseofulvin
Vitamin K