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Articles Exercise 1

Exercise based on the opening text in Thanks a Million
Please complete the following exercise using a/an/the/0 (no article) in the underlined spaces
where appropriate. Change capital letters to lower case letters at the beginning of a sentence if
necessary.
Ms Parrot, (1) ___ most famous lady detective of (2) ___ twenty-first century, was born in
(3) ___ United Kingdom in (4) ___ 1960s. Since then, she has been to many countries, including (5)
___ Portugal, Singapore and Australia, and has lived in (6) ___ northern hemisphere and (7) ___
southern hemisphere, as well as on (8) ___ equator. She has never been to (9) ___ Philippines or
(10) ___ United States, but she speaks (11) English, French and Portuguese. Like Sherlock Holmes,
(12) ___ famous detective, she plays (13) ___ violin, and sometimes practises up to five times (14)
___ day. She is also (15) ___ only person in (16) ___ world to have performed Tchaikovsky’s 1812
overture [a long piece of music] in one breath on (17) ___ recorder.
She has been (18) ___ detective for thirty years and claims that although many people
think that being (19) ___ detective is (20) ___ piece of cake, detectives generally work very hard
and it’s not all fun and games. (21) ___ detective is someone who solves mysteries, and (22) ___
people who contact Ms Parrot have some very unusual problems. Little information is available
about some of (23) ___ cases she has solved, but quite (24) ___ few of her most famous cases
have attracted worldwide attention and she has been offered up to (25) ___ thousand dollars (26)
___ hour to help solve mysteries such as (27) ___ case of (28) ___ Australian owl in (29) ___
uniform. (30) ___ bird laid (31) ___ egg in (32) ___ European nest in less than (33) ___ hour after
its arrival. What (34) ___ strange problem!
With great (35) ___ modesty, she has either declined such (36) ___ fee or donated (37) ___
money to (38) ___ poor, or to (39) ___ Grammar Survival Fund, believing that (40) ___ detective
should use their skills for (41) ___ common good.

Julia Miller, Articles exercises, English for Uni, www.adelaide.edu.au/english-for-uni 1

a unique place – there is only one southern hemisphere equator – a unique place – there is only one equator Philippines – a country with a plural name United States – a country with a plural name English – a language detective – Singular countable noun. believing that (40) the detective should use their skills for (41) the common good. Like Sherlock Holmes. (21) A detective is someone who solves mysteries. French and Portuguese. Singapore and Australia. playing an instrument day – Singular countable noun. English for Uni. she has been to many countries. but quite (24) a few of her most famous cases have attracted worldwide attention and she has been offered up to (25) a thousand dollars (26) an hour to help solve mysteries such as (27) the case of (28) an Australian owl in (29) a uniform. unless they are plural or have ‘United’ in the name northern hemisphere – Singular countable noun. a unique place – there is only one northern hemisphere southern hemisphere – Singular countable noun. Since then. (12) the famous detective. and (22) the people who contact Ms Parrot have some very unusual problems. (30) The bird laid (31) an egg in (32) a European nest in less than (33) an hour after its arrival. including (5) 0 Portugal. she plays (13) the violin. She is also (15) the only person in (16) the world to have performed Tchaikovsky’s 1812 overture in one breath on (17) the recorder. ordinal (twenty-first) United Kingdom – a country with ‘United’ in the name 1960s – a decade Portugal – Country names don’t usually take an article. www. so he is not just ‘a famous detective’ (one of many) but ‘the famous detective’ whose name everyone knows violin – Singular countable noun. as well as on (8) the equator. but she speaks (11) 0 English. or to (39) the Grammar Survival Fund. Little information is available about some of (23) the cases she has solved. Articles exercises. (1) the most famous lady detective of (2) the twenty-first century. and sometimes practises up to five times (14) a day. she has either declined such (36) a fee or donated (37) the money to (38) the poor.adelaide.Answers to Articles Exercise 1 – Passage with correct articles inserted Ms Parrot. She has never been to (9) the Philippines or (10) the United States.au/english-for-uni 2 . superlative (most) century – Singular countable noun.edu. and has lived in (6) the northern hemisphere and (7) the southern hemisphere. Detailed Answers to Articles Exercise 1 1 2 3 4 5 the the the the 0 6 the 7 the 8 9 10 11 12 the the the 0 the 13 14 the a detective – Singular countable noun. everyone knows about this detective. What (34) a strange problem! With great (35) 0 modesty. a rate Julia Miller. She has been (18) a detective for thirty years and claims that although many people think that being (19) a detective is (20) a piece of cake. was born in (3) the United Kingdom in (4) the 1960s. detectives generally work very hard and it’s not all fun and games.

countable noun. money is associated with fee. definition. countable noun starting with a consonant sound. a job detective – Singular countable noun. a is used instead of one hour – Singular countable noun starting with a vowel sound. English for Uni. Articles exercises. an adjective used as a noun Grammar Survival Fund – Singular. specific (we know which case) and followed by of owl – Singular countable noun. This is also an exclamation. positive. it means that any detective is a person who solves mysteries. In this case. countable noun. we know which bird – the owl that was mentioned previously egg – Singular. countable noun. meaning ‘some’ thousand – A number. first mention problem – Singular. countable noun starting with a vowel sound. first mention. first mention. It refers to a kind of instrument. first mention hour – Singular. names of organisations usually take the detective – Singular. countable noun preceded by an adjective starting with a consonant sound. and exclamations often take a modesty – Uncountable noun fee – Singular. countable noun. a single part of a whole.au/english-for-uni 3 . first mention European nest – Singular. countable noun starting with a vowel sound. and draws the reader into the plot. you will see titles such as The case of the city clerk (by Agatha Christie). a rate. an adjective used as a noun Julia Miller. uniform – Singular. expression such a takes a money – Uncountable noun. countable noun. (A piece of cake is also an idiom meaning ‘very simple’. people – Plural countable noun followed by a relative clause (who contact Ms Parrot) cases – Plural countable noun followed by a relative clause (abbreviated from which she has solved) few – Pronoun (a few). a unique place recorder – Singular countable noun. This is a convention in detective novel titles. first mention bird – Singular. not a particular example of that instrument.edu. www. detective – Singular countable noun. In many detective novels. Definitions can take ‘a’ or ‘the’. case – Singular countable noun. Australian starts with a vowel sound. a representative of a class good – Uncountable noun. so it takes an. as though they are already familiar with the case.15 16 17 the the the 18 19 20 a a a 21 a 22 the 23 the 24 25 26 27 28 a a an the an 29 30 a the 31 32 an a 33 34 an a 35 36 37 0 a the 38 39 the the 40 41 the the only person – Singular countable noun preceded by a unique adjective (only) world – Singular countable noun.adelaide. so we know which money and it becomes definite poor – Uncountable noun. a job piece – Singular countable noun. this is similar to ‘she plays the recorder’.) detective – Singular countable noun.

What strange problem! With great modesty. She has never been to Philippines or United States. bird laid egg in European nest in less than hour after its arrival.Articles Exercise 2 Exercise based on the opening text in Thanks a Million This exercise is very difficult because no gaps are indicated. but she speaks English. Can you add articles (a/an/the) where necessary in the following text? Change capital letters to lower case letters at the beginning of a sentence if necessary. She is also only person in world to have performed Tchaikovsky’s 1812 overture in one breath on recorder. and people who contact Ms Parrot have some very unusual problems. but quite few of her most famous cases have attracted worldwide attention and she has been offered up to thousand dollars hour to help solve mysteries such as case of Australian owl in uniform. www. and has lived in northern hemisphere and southern hemisphere. she has been to many countries. English for Uni. Ms Parrot. Singapore and Australia. she plays violin. Little information is available about some of cases she has solved. and sometimes practises up to five times day. Articles exercises. she has either declined such fee or donated money to poor.adelaide. detective is someone who solves mysteries. Since then. was born in United Kingdom in 1960s. including Portugal. Julia Miller. Like Sherlock Holmes. famous detective. believing that detective should use their skills for common good. or to Grammar Survival Fund. She has been detective for thirty years and claims that although many people think that being detective is piece of cake. French and Portuguese.edu. most famous lady detective of twenty-first century.au/english-for-uni 4 . detectives generally work very hard and it’s not all fun and games. as well as on equator.

au/english-for-uni 5 . Singapore and Australia. she has been to many countries. Julia Miller.adelaide. She is also the only person in the world to have performed Tchaikovsky’s 1812 overture in one breath on the recorder. Like Sherlock Holmes. Since then. and has lived in the northern hemisphere and the southern hemisphere. she plays the violin. but quite a few of her most famous cases have attracted worldwide attention and she has been offered up to a thousand dollars an hour to help solve mysteries such as the case of an Australian owl in a uniform. Little information is available about some of the cases she has solved. The bird laid an egg in a European nest in less than an hour after its arrival. www. and sometimes practises up to five times a day.edu. the famous detective. and the people who contact Ms Parrot have some very unusual problems. believing that the detective should use their skills for the common good. as well as on the equator. A detective is someone who solves mysteries. She has never been to the Philippines or the United States. French and Portuguese. Articles exercises. she has either declined such a fee or donated the money to the poor. including Portugal. but she speaks English. English for Uni. the most famous lady detective of the twenty-first century.Answers to Articles Exercise 2 – Passage with correct articles inserted Ms Parrot. What a strange problem! With great modesty. detectives generally work very hard and it’s not all fun and games. She has been a detective for thirty years and claims that although many people think that being a detective is a piece of cake. was born in the United Kingdom in the 1960s. or to the Grammar Survival Fund.

so he is not just ‘a famous detective’ (one of many) but ‘the famous detective’ whose name everyone knows plays the violin – playing an instrument five times a day – a rate the only – a unique adjective the world – a unique place Julia Miller. She is also (14) the only person in (15) the world to have performed Tchaikovsky’s 1812 (16) overture in one (17) breath on (18) the recorder. but she speaks (10) English. www. French. (24) detectives generally work very hard and it’s not all (25) fun and (26) games. French and Portuguese. She has never been to (9) the Philippines or the United States. Singapore and Australia.Detailed Answers to Articles Exercise 2 Ms Parrot. the Maldives and the Seychelles) English. English for Uni. or to (52) the Grammar Survival Fund. What (47) a strange problem! With great (48) modesty. but quite (33) a few of (34) her most famous cases have attracted worldwide (35) attention and she has been offered up to (36) a thousand dollars (37) an hour to help solve (38) mysteries such as (39) the case of (40) an Australian owl in (41) a uniform. (31) Little information is available about some of (32) the cases she has solved. and (29) the people who contact Ms Parrot have some very unusual (30) problems. Portuguese – the names of languages do not take articles the famous detective – everyone knows about this detective.au/english-for-uni 6 .edu. (1) the most famous lady detective of (2) the twenty-first century. This text is also explained in detail at the beginning of the quiz show in the video. Since then.adelaide. including (5) Portugal. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 the most famous lady detective – superlative the twenty-first century – ordinal the United Kingdom – a country with ‘United’ in the name the 1960s – a decade Portugal. as well as on (8) the equator. unless they are plural or have ‘United’ in the name the northern hemisphere – a unique place – there is only one northern hemisphere the southern hemisphere – a unique place – there is only one southern hemisphere the equator – a unique place – there is only one equator the Philippines. believing that (53) the detective should use (54) their skills for (55) the common good. Like Sherlock Holmes. The tips below indicate why a certain article is used or not used in the text above. Singapore. (27) A detective is someone who solves (28) mysteries. Australia – country names don’t usually take an article. she has either declined such (49) a fee or donated (50) the money to (51) the poor. was born in (3) the United Kingdom in (4) the 1960s. Articles exercises. and has lived in (6) the northern hemisphere and (7) the southern hemisphere. she plays (12) the violin. (11) the famous detective. She has been (19) a detective for (20) thirty years and claims that although (21) many people think that being (22) a detective is (23) a piece of cake. and sometimes practises up to five times (13) a day. the United States – countries with plural names (other examples are the Netherlands. she has been to many countries. (42) The bird laid (43) an egg in (44) a European nest in less than (45) an hour after (46) its arrival.

) a detective – definition. Articles exercises. so we know which money and it becomes definite Julia Miller.adelaide. It refers to a kind of instrument. www. and exclamations often take a modesty – uncountable noun such a fee – expression such a takes a the money – money is associated with fee. English for Uni. This piece of music is sometimes called the 1812 overture. countable noun preceded by an adjective starting with a consonant sound an hour – first mention of a singular. the cases she has solved – noun followed by a relative clause (abbreviated from which she has solved) a few – positive. a uniform – first mention of a singular. This is also an exclamation. countable noun starting with a vowel sound a European nest – first mention of a singular. mysteries – plural noun used generally the people who contact Ms Parrot – noun followed by a relative clause (‘who contact Ms Parrot’) some very unusual problems – no article is needed after some little information – negative – not very much. Australian starts with a vowel sound. In this case. (A piece of cake is also an idiom meaning ‘very simple’. Definitions can take ‘a’ or ‘the’.) detectives generally – plural and not specific fun – uncountable noun and not specific games – plural noun and not specific. (Fun and games is an idiom referring to something enjoyable. it means that any detective is a person who solves mysteries. countable noun starting with a vowel sound its arrival – no need for an article because of the possessive its what a strange problem – first mention of a singular. a detective – someone’s job thirty years – no article is needed because there is a number many people – no article is needed after many a detective – someone’s job a piece of cake – a single part of a whole. and hour starts with a vowel sound so it takes an mysteries – not specific the case of – specific and followed by of an Australian owl – first mention of a singular countable noun. meaning ‘some’ her most famous cases – possessive her. because there is only one famous piece of music with this name. as though they are already familiar with the case. so it takes an. you will see titles such as The case of the city clerk (by Agatha Christie). countable noun the bird – we know which bird – the owl that was mentioned previously an egg – first mention of a singular. In many detective novels.edu. countable noun. one breath – the word ‘one’ replaces an article the recorder – this is similar to ‘she plays the recorder’.16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 Tchaikovsky’s 1812 overture – the noun ‘overture’ is preceded by a possessive (Tchaikovksky’s). and draws the reader into the plot. so no need for an article attention – uncountable noun used generally a thousand dollars – a is used instead of one an hour – a rate. This is a convention in detective novel titles. not a particular example of that instrument.au/english-for-uni 7 .

51 52 53 54 55 the poor – an adjective used as a noun the Grammar Survival Fund – names of organisations usually take the the detective – a representative of a class their skills – no need for an article because of the possessive their the common good – an adjective used as a noun Julia Miller.au/english-for-uni 8 .edu. Articles exercises. www.adelaide. English for Uni.

The differences are small but significant.Articles Exercise 3 Please complete the following exercise using a/an/the/0 (no article) in the underlined spaces where appropriate. the technology that helps us to describe it. M 2002. English for Uni.) Change capital letters to lower case letters at the beginning of a sentence if necessary. Macmillan Education. and (3) ___ needs and goals of those learning and teaching (4) ___ English. Everything is changing and expanding: the English language itself. (7) ___ Another of the Macmillan English Dictionary’s innovations is that two similar but separate editions have been created from (8) ___ same database: one for learners whose main target variety is (9) ___ American English.edu. ‘Introduction’.) Julia Miller. It has been (11) ___ privilege to work with such (12) ___ talented and creative team. Macmillan English dictionary for advanced learners. and I would like to thank (13) ___ team for producing such (14) ___ excellent book.au/english-for-uni 9 . x. but others are missing. Oxford. There has never been (1) ___ more exciting time to produce (2) ___ new dictionary. www. (adapted from Rundell.adelaide. (10) ___ other for learners of British English. (Some articles have been included for you. I hope you enjoy (15) ___ results of our hard work and find the dictionary (16) ___ pleasure to use. (5) ___ 1980s saw the development of (6) ___ first large corpora (special collections) of English text. The Macmillan English Dictionary is the product of good linguistic data and high-quality people. Articles exercises. p.

not specific dictionary – Singular countable noun.adelaide. first mention Julia Miller. first mention. so it is specific . (5) The 1980s saw the development of (6) the first large corpora (special collections) of English text. specific.the other unique privilege – Singular countable noun. Macmillan Education. (adapted from Rundell. ‘Introduction’. first mention. first mention. (10) the other for learners of British English. word pattern such a team – Singular countable noun. Macmillan English dictionary for advanced learners. not specific needs and goals – Plural. The Macmillan English Dictionary is the product of good linguistic data and high-quality people. word pattern such a followed by a vowel sound in the adjective results – Plural countable noun. M 2002. and I would like to thank (13) the team for producing such (14) an excellent book. www.edu. specific. the technology that helps us to describe it. Oxford. The differences are small but significant. x. Everything is changing and expanding: the English language itself. Articles exercises. and (3) the needs and goals of those learning and teaching (4) 0 English. as we know whose needs and goals the writer is referring to. We do not need to repeat the for goals English – Uncountable noun used generally. p. English for Uni. (7) 0 Another of the Macmillan English Dictionary’s innovations is that two similar but separate editions have been created from (8) the same database: one for learners whose main target variety is (9) 0 American English.Answers to Articles Exercise 3 There has never been (1) a more exciting time to produce (2) a new dictionary. I hope you enjoy (15) the results of our hard work and find the dictionary (16) a pleasure to use. so no article 1980s – Decade first – Ordinal Another – No need for an article. as we know which results: the results of our hard work pleasure – Singular countable noun. as it is included in another same database – Unique adjective same American English – Uncountable noun used generally. first mention.au/english-for-uni 10 .) (1) (2) (3) a a the (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) 0 the the 0 the 0 the a (12) (13) a the (14) an (15) the (16) a time – Singular countable noun. adjective starts with a consonant sound team – Singular countable noun. countable nouns. followed by of and therefore specific. not specific. so no article other – We know this is the second of two databases. first mention. It has been (11) a unique privilege to work with such (12) a talented and creative team. as we know which team (it has just been mentioned) excellent book – Singular countable noun.

More Detailed Answers to Articles Exercise 3 There has never been (1) a more exciting time to produce (2) a new dictionary. We do not need to repeat the for goals (4) 0 English – Uncountable noun used generally.au/english-for-uni 11 . as we know whose needs and goals the writer is referring to. (7) 0 Another of (e) the Macmillan English Dictionary’s innovations is that (f) two similar but separate editions have been created from (8) the same database: one for (g) learners whose main target variety is (9) 0 American English. x. not specific – we do not know anything about these learners generally except that they want to learn American English (9) 0 American English – Uncountable noun used generally. (i) The differences are small but significant. not specific (a) the English language – Singular countable noun. a specific dictionary with a name (f) two editions – Plural countable noun. It has been (11) a unique privilege to work with such (12) a talented and creative team. first mention. (5) The 1980s saw (c) the development of (6) the first large corpora (special collections) of English (d) text. (10) the other for learners of (h) British English. so no article (10) the other – We know this is the second of two databases. so they are not specific. I hope you enjoy (15) the results of (n) our hard work and find (o) the dictionary (16) a pleasure to use. Macmillan Education.Plural countable noun. English text in general (7) 0 Another – No need for an article. followed by of and therefore specific. and (3) the needs and goals of those learning and teaching (4) 0 English. (j) The Macmillan English Dictionary is (k) the product of good linguistic (l) data and high-quality (m) people.) Detailed Answers (1) a time – Singular countable noun. first mention. as it is included in another (e) the Macmillan English Dictionary – Singular countable noun. we know which technology is being referred to – the technology that helps us to describe it – and a relative clause is used. we know which development is referred to – the development of the first large corpora – so it is specific (6) the first – Ordinal (d) 0 text – Uncountable noun. a number is given. (b) the technology that helps us to describe it. we know which language – English – so it is specific (b) the technology – Uncountable noun. he could say ‘The two editions I mentioned earlier’. English for Uni. If the author referred to them again. so no article (5) the 1980s – Decade (c) the development – Uncountable noun. so no article is necessary. This is the first time these editions are introduced to us. Macmillan English dictionary for advanced learners. and I would like to thank (13) the team for producing such (14) an excellent book. so it is specific – the other (h) 0 British English – Uncountable noun used generally Julia Miller. Articles exercises. so it is specific (3) the needs and goals – Plural countable nouns. M 2002. (8) the same database – Unique adjective same (g) 0 learners . www. (adapted from Rundell. Oxford.adelaide. p.edu. Everything is changing and expanding: (a) the English language itself. ‘Introduction’. not specific (2) a dictionary – Singular countable noun.

not specific unique privilege – Singular countable noun.au/english-for-uni 12 . you could say ‘a product’. first mention Julia Miller. as we know which team (it has just been mentioned) excellent book – Singular countable noun. not specific. as we know which results: the results of our hard work our hard work – Uncountable noun preceded by our (a possessive adjective/possessive determiner) dictionary – Singular countable noun. a specific dictionary with a name product – Singular countable noun followed by ‘of’. English for Uni. word pattern such a followed by a vowel sound in the adjective results – Plural countable noun. specific. word pattern such a team – Singular countable noun. www.(i) the (j) the (k) the (l) (m) (11) 0 0 a (12) (13) a the (14) an (15) the (n) 0 (o) the (16) a differences – Plural countable noun. first mention. first mention. first mention. but that would sound as though it is just one of many. Articles exercises.edu. general.adelaide. general. adjective starts with a consonant sound team – Singular countable noun. not specific people – Plural form of person. specific. we know which differences – the differences between the two varieties of English Macmillan English Dictionary – Singular countable noun. definite because we know which dictionary the writer is referring to pleasure – Singular countable noun. whereas the writer wants to stress this particular product data – Plural countable noun.

page where the quotation was found. (adapted from Hay. p. but others are missing. The in-text reference should give date that the work you are referring to was published. Bochner. www. the family name of the author and. It is easy system. Articles exercises. Making the grade. I. D & Dungey. English for Uni. C 1997. Oxford University Press Australia. Sydney.adelaide. in the case of quotations.edu.) The Harvard referencing system has two essential components: brief in-text references throughout your assignment and a comprehensive list of references at end of your assignment.Articles Exercise 4 Can you add articles (a/an/the) where necessary in the following text? (Some articles have been included for you.au/english-for-uni 13 . 155) Julia Miller. once you understand it.

Sydney. as we know what the writer is referring to Singular countable noun preceded by the possessive your Singular countable noun. so they are specific. (3) the page where (n) the quotation was found. specific because it is part of a relative clause – the work you are referring to Singular countable noun. specific. (j) the family name of (k) the author and. However. www. (adapted from Hay. you could also say the references because we know which references we are talking about – the ones in your assignment. so it takes the Plural countable noun preceded by the number two. Singular countable noun.Answers to Articles Exercise 4 (1) the (2) (3) the the (4) an Singular countable noun. begins with a vowel sound More Detailed Answers to Articles Exercise 4 The comments on the underlined articles below have been added for extra information. we know which referencing system. followed by of and therefore specific. p. as there is only one publication date Singular countable noun. once you understand it. 155) (a) (b) the 0 (c) 0 (d) (e) (f) 0 a 0 (1) the (g) (h) 0 the (2) (i) the the (j) the (k) the Singular countable noun. Making the grade. one of many systems. specific because we have mentioned the idea of an in-text reference before Singular countable noun. Bochner. as we know what the writer is referring to Singular countable noun. (h) The in-text reference should give (2) the date that (i) the work you are referring to was published. I. so not specific. not specific. followed by of and therefore specific. specific because the noun is followed by of and we know which name we are talking about Singular countable noun.au/english-for-uni 14 . so there is no need for an article Plural countable noun. Both these options are correct. as it refers to a particular page: the page where the information can be found Singular countable noun. first mention. you could also say the brief in-text references because we know they are the ones used in your assignment. It is (4) an easy system. Articles exercises.edu. English for Uni. as there is only one publication date Singular countable noun. specific. However.adelaide. C 1997. Singular countable noun preceded by the possessive your First mention of a singular countable noun Plural countable noun. Oxford University Press Australia. specific because we know which author – the one in the reference Julia Miller. not specific because we are talking about references generally in the assignment. in (l) the case of (m) quotations. specific. (a) The Harvard referencing system has two essential (b) components: brief in-text (c) references throughout your (d) assignment and (e) a comprehensive list of (f) references at (1) the end of your (g) assignment. D & Dungey.

adelaide. not specific – any quotations Singular countable noun.au/english-for-uni 15 . specific because the noun is followed by of and we know which case we are talking about – the case of quotations Plural countable noun. www. so not specific. begins with a vowel sound Julia Miller. as it refers to a particular page: the page where the information can be found Singular countable noun. specific.edu. one of many systems.(l) the (m) (3) 0 the (n) the (4) an Singular countable noun. first mention. English for Uni. specific because we know which quotation is being referred to – the one in your text Singular countable noun. Articles exercises.

and is quite foreign to desires that ought to accompany those things. p. 22) Julia Miller. and he is not mercenary for desiring it. London. general who fights for victory is not.B. This exercise is very difficult and caused a lot of discussion among speakers of English as a first language. Money is not natural reward of love. Transposition and other addresses. that is why we call man mercenary if he marries woman for sake of her money. General who fights well in order to get a peerage is mercenary.edu. depending on how the noun is interpreted. (Lewis. Articles exercises. Different choices of article are possible in several cases.Articles Exercise 5 Can you add articles (a/an/the) where necessary in the following text? N. www. and ‘reward’ can be either a countable or an uncountable noun. But marriage is proper reward for real lover. There are different kinds of reward. victory being proper reward of battle as marriage is proper reward of love. CS 1949. There is reward which has no natural connexion with things you do to earn it. Geoffrey Bles.au/english-for-uni 16 . Note that ‘mercenary’ can be both a noun and an adjective. English for Uni.adelaide.

There is (1) the reward which has no natural connexion with (2) the (0) things you do to earn it.Answers to Articles Exercise 5 The author’s original article usage is given in bold font.edu. (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) the the the the a a the the a a the a the 0 a a the the the reward . defined by a relative clause mercenary – Adjective mercenary – Singular countable noun. representative of a class of people who love general – Singular countable noun. referring to any man woman – Singular countable noun. the only proper reward reward – Singular countable noun. first mention.au/english-for-uni 17 .adelaide. There are different kinds of reward. first mention.Singular countable noun followed by a relative clause things . the only proper reward Julia Miller. But marriage is (8) the (a) proper reward for (9) a (the) real lover.Plural countable noun followed by a relative clause desires . first mention lover – Singular countable noun. (12) a (the) general who fights for victory is not. and he is not mercenary for desiring it. defined by a relative clause reward – Singular countable noun. any general general – Singular countable noun. first mention general – Singular countable noun. Money is not (4) the natural reward of love. one of many possible rewards lover – Singular countable noun. referring to any woman sake – Singular countable noun followed by ‘of’ reward – Singular countable noun. with alternatives in brackets. (10) A (the) general who fights well in order to get a peerage is (11) (a) mercenary. first mention. English for Uni. that is why we call (5) a man mercenary if he marries (6) a woman for (7) the sake of her money. Articles exercises.Plural countable noun followed by a relative clause reward – Singular countable noun followed by ‘of’ man – Singular countable noun. the only proper reward reward – Singular countable noun. and is quite foreign to (3) the (0) desires that ought to accompany those things. victory being (13) the proper reward of battle as marriage is (14) the proper reward of love. www. any general general – Singular countable noun.