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Skull Imaging Techniques

Dr: Hashem Hassouna Phd. Oral Maxillofacial Surgery

Lecturer Faculty of Dentistry. Pharos University

Mandibular Fracture Imaging


Basic anatomy of the mandible.

This midline sagittal drawing illustrates the anterior attachments of the genioglossus and
geniohyoid muscles. If the symphysis becomes a free fragment (as with bilateral parasymphyseal
fractures), the symphysis retracts posteriorly, compromising the airway. The anterior belly of the
digastric muscle is not depicted in the image because it is lateral to this central section.

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Axial computed tomography scan of a left condylar fracture, with lateral displacement of the
proximal condylar fragment.

This coronal computed tomography scan clearly shows a right subcondylar fracture.

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Panoramic radiographic image shows a left angle fracture extending to and dislodging the molar.
This image also shows a right symphyseal fracture.

The normal Towne view in this radiograph shows the mandibular condyles well.

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Posteroanterior radiographic view of a left condylar fracture.

Posteroanterior radiographic view showing a left angle fracture.

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Posteroanterior radiographic view of a fracture of the left body and angle.

Towne radiographic view of a left body and angle fracture.

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Panoramic radiographic image that was obtained after maxillary-mandibular fixation (wiring the
jaw shut) of a right angle and left symphyseal fracture.

Panoramic radiographic image shows a left angle fracture extending to and dislodging the molar.
This image also shows a right symphyseal fracture.

Panoramic radiographic image of the lesion through the right body.

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Panoramic radiographic image of a fracture of the left symphysis and right body. The body
fracture extends through a tooth. This is considered a compound fracture.

Posteroanterior radiographic view

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Towne's view (skull AP axial view)

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Skull lateral view
The skull lateral view is a nonangled lateral radiograph of the skull. This view provides an
overview of the entire skull rather than attempting to highlight any one region

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Submentovertex)
Name of projection Skull - SMV (Submentovertex) (also called Basal)
This view looks at the base of the skull, including structures such as
Area Covered
the foramen ovale, foramen spinosum, and sphenoid sinuses
Pathology shown Some pathologies of the base of the skull and sphenoid sinuses

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Occipitomental view
Water view (also known as the Occipitomental view) is a radiographic view, where an X-ray beam is
angled at 45 to the orbitomeatal line.[1] The rays pass from behind the head and are perpendicular to
the radiographic plate. It is commonly used to get a better view of the maxillary sinuses. Another
variation of the waters according to Merrill's Atlas of Radiographic Positioning and Procedures places
the orbitomeatal line at a 37 angle to the image receptor

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Structures observed

Maxillary sinuses
Frontal sinuses (oblique view)
Ethmoidal cells
Sphenoid sinus (through open mouth)
Odontoid process (if it is just below the mentum, it confirms adequate extension of the head)

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