You are on page 1of 10

J.S.

BACH’S CHACONNE
TRANSCRIBED FOR THE CELLO

Harro Ruijsenaars

Göteborg 2013
WHY

A renowned Dutch violinist to whom I mentioned my project of transcribing


for performance Bach’s Chaconne asked me: “But why? Bach wrote six suites
for the cello. Is that not enough”. True enough, these suites have given me
fifty years of great joy and challenge. But what about Brahms, Busoni and
others who had the wealth of Bach’s keyboard music at hand? What about
Mendelssohn and Schumann who wrote piano accompaniments for this work for
solo violin, marked “Senza Basso” by its composer?

When asked: “Why climb Mount Everest”, George Mallory answered: “Because
it’s there”. A very good answer indeed and fitting to the “Why” above.

For me as a music lover Bach’s Chaconne is the ultimate work of polyphony and
variation art written for a string instrument. It is a work in which the strictness
of form never feels stifling because of the wide range of musical emotion and
instrumental effects.

As a cellist I have been intrigued by the question how Bach would have composed
for my instrument if virtuosi like Boccherini or Duport, both born after 1740,
would have existed in his environment. Would he still have written for the cello
restricting himself to the fourth position upwards (the minor seventh on the A
string)?

Voltaire is quoted as having remarked after hearing the great Duport: “He
knows how to make a nightingale of an ox”. One might assume that the cellists
in the German cities where Bach prevailed were not yet familiar with the thumb
position, opening for extra octaves in the higher register. But later on Bach’s
sons, Carl Philip in Berlin and Johann Christian in London, wrote cello works
in which the “nightingale” register was effectively used.

When Bach chose the Violoncello Piccolo or the Viola Pomposa it was probably
for the lighter instrumental character of these instruments; he certainly wanted
the higher register possibility.

It is significant that for the highest note in the Prelude of the 6th cello suite
Bach uses the same interval on the E string, a minor tenth (g”), as for the
highest note in the Chaconne for solo violin (g’’’), demanding quasi violin left
hand technique. Could he have written a Chaconne for the cello? It appears to
me that the majestic sonority of the Chaconne fits the cello well. The handicap
of not having an E string is after all the same as when playing the sixth suite
on the four stringed cello. So I decided to put this to the test.

Having arrived at a point in life where my cello no longer is one in a crowd and
where there is time for taking on challenges, I felt that my love for polyphony,
double stops, triple stops and even richer harmonies needed this outlet.
HOW

There are already several cello arrangements of Bach’s Chaconne. But I find
that these versions elaborate far beyond the original text with many “cellistic”
embellishments as well as, in my opinion, unnecessary alterations.

I have tried to follow the autograph in transcribing it for the cello, but I do
not always play an octave down. Incidental excursions into the original violin
register are made1 . The result is that the texture of the work is enriched,
sometimes drawn out of the darker register in order to give way for a more
brilliant one. Bach meets Boccherini, as it were, but without any changes in the
score.

In Bach’s autograph, up and down bow signs are lacking. In fact it is very well
possible and more animate to play the bowings “as they come” respecting the
written slurs2 . Therefore I have omitted bowing suggestions in my transcription.

Many four string chords are impossible to play in their entirety as the cello
lacks an E string. But arpeggio playing can be accomplished quite well by using
the same string for two consecutive steps in the chord. Even with a baroque
style bow, three and four string chords must be played arpeggiando. Too much
stringency when trying to play these strings simultaneously makes an aggressive
sound. Tasteful timing is needed.

Still, even then, there are those chords where playing the exact sequence 8va
bassa on the cello is impossible or does not sound well. In these chords I have
tried to choose the most important harmonic lines, sometimes eliminating voices
that often only occur because on the violin the corresponding string must be
included in the arpeggio.

In my version episodes are frequently situated in the neck positions. It helps


to be blessed with big hands and a cello that works soundwise when playing in
these positions, especially on a G string not hampered by “wolf” tones. See for
instance bars 107-109.

Some of my fingerings seem “uncellistic” where I avoid audible shifts from low
to high positions and downward in linear passages on the A and D strings. The
reason is that, on the violin, shifting of this kind is mostly unnecessary and in
authentic style performance avoided or not emphasized by the players.

Octave and fifth flageolets are used as a “bridge” for clarity in shifting but
also to add resonance. Resonance is an important reason for transcribing the
Chaconne for the cello: A larger acoustical body!

Harro Ruijsenaars
1 Bars 48-52, 65-72 and 133-139
2 About bowings in Bach see e.g. Anner Bylsma “Bach senza Basso”, 2012.
Chaconne
transcription for violoncello

™ ™
1 2
J.S. Bach - transcribed by Harro Ruijsenaars 2013
j œ j œ
2

? b 43 œ˙˙™ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ˙™ œ œœ ˙˙
j
1

j
0 1

œ œ
œj œ j œ œ œ
0 0

œ™ œ™ œ
2 4 1

œ
3 3

œ
1 4

œœ#˙˙˙ œœœ ˙˙ œœ ˙
4 4
4

œ œ #œ œ œ ˙ œ #˙ œ ˙ B
J
œ œj™ œ œ œ ™ œ 1 œ™œ™j œ™™ œœ œœ™™ œ
j jj œjj - jj ‰
™ ™
œ ™ œ

4 1 4 4 4

? œ™ œ œ
1 1 1

œ™ œ œ -
3 4

œ œ œ œ œ
8
œ œ œ™ œ™ œ
3

œœ ‰ œ œœ ‰ ‰ ™ œœ
3 4

B b # œj œ œ#œ
4 2 4
4

œ œœ™™ J J J J

œ J r j R
œœj œœj œ œ ™ œœj œ™ œœ œ ™# œ
j j j
2

œ r
3

j ‰ j
œ # œ œ ™ œ œœ ‰ ‰ j ‰
1

™ œ œœ ™ œ œ ™ œ™ œ
4

? b œ™ œ œ™ œ œ œœ ™ œ œ
1

Ϫ
1

œ œ
0
12
œ œ™ œ#œœ™
J ‰ œJ ‰ ‰ ™ œR
3 4 3 1

‰ ™ œR J
œÓJ ‰ Œ œ
J J
œ™™ œœ œ # œ ™ œ 2œ™j œ œ™ œ œ œ ™ œœ œ ™ œ œ™ œ œ™#œ œ ™nœ œ ™ œ œ™ œ œ™ œ œ ™ œœ œœ ™™ œ
‰ ™ R #œ nœ ‰ ™ œR nœ bœ #œ‰ ™ œR œ ™nœ #œ ™
3 4 2 ϙ 1 ϙ
2 1 ϙ
16

œ™ œ˙
?b œ ˙ œ
ϙ

œ B
ϙ
3

J
œ ™ œ œ ™ œ œ™ œ œ™#œ œ ™nœ œ ™
œ œœ™#œnœ œ ™ ?nœr
ϙ ϙ

r œ™ œ œ
3

œ
‰™ R ‰ ™ R nœ bœ
œ
3 2 2

Ϫ Ϫ
1 x2 0

œ œ
ϙ
21
B b œ™ œ œ œ œ™ œ
2 3 3

‰™ R ‰™ œ
# œ nœ œ #œ
ϙ ϙ 3

#œ œ
2

J
œ œ œ#œ œ
œœ œ œ#œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
25 3
? b œœ
2

œ
0

J J J œJ œJ
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ#œ œ œ œ œ œbœ#œ œ
œ œ œ
29
œ œ œ œ œ œ
1

? b œœ #œ #œ œ nœ#œ œ œ œ
x3
4 1
1

R œ
œ œnœnœ#œ œ œ œ 4 œ œ œ#œ œ n œ #œ
nœ œ œ œ nœ œ ?
1
32
? b #œ œ
1 2

œ B
4


0 1

œ œ #œ nœ n œ IV

œ œ œ#œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Bœ œ œ œ # œ n œ œ œ #œ œ œ n œ #œ œ œnœ ? œ#œ œ
0
36 1

?b
3 3 2

œ œ
II

b œ œ # œ b œ œ # œ œ œnœ
œnœ ? œ#œ œ#œnœnœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œnœ# œ œ œ œ œ
5
b œ
39
? b nœ œ œ#œ œ B

œ#œ n œ œ b œ œ œ bœ œ #œnœ œ œ œœ
œ œ
42
?b œ œ#œ œnœbœ œ œ œ œ œ œ nœ œ œ 2

œ œœ œ
œ œ œ#œ œnœ
2
œœœœœ œ œ
œ #œ œ œ#œ œ œ œnœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ#œ œ œ œ
45
?
b
2

6
? #œ œ œnœnœ#œ œ
48
œ œ
1 3 ϙ

œ œ
ϙ 2 3

b #œ œ &œ œ# œ œ œ œ œ œ œn œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œbœ
ϙ 3

œ
œ œ œœ œœœ
œ œ
0
51
#œ œ œ œ œ ? œ œ
2 ϙ 2 3 4 0

& b œ œ œbœ œ œ œ œ œ B
ϙ

œ œ œ nœ œ # œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ œ œ # œ œ
B b œ ? œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Bœ œ œ ? œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Bœ œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ œœœ
0
54 ϙ
1

j
57 7 j jœ j j œj œj j œj œj œ œœœ
œ œ
Bb œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œœ œœj #œ œ nœ#œJ œ ?
œ œ
1
1 1 4 2

œ œœ
4

œ œ
J
œœj # œ œ œj œ
œ œj j œ
œj j œ
3

n œ œ œ œ
0

œ nœ b œ nœ
61
œ œœœœœ œœ œœœ œ
ϙ 1

?b œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ nœ
0 1
3 0 2 3
0 4 0 3

œ œ
64
?b #œ œ œ
œ œ
1

œ œ œ 8œ
œ nœ œ œ œ
œ œ œ &œ œ œ œ
4 ϙ

œ œ œ
3

R œ nœ œ œ œ
IV
66

& b œœ œ œ œ œ œ œœœœœ œ œ œ œnœ


b œ œ œ b œ œ œ
œ œ œœ œ œ œ
œ œ œ œ œ
R R
68
œ œ œ œ œœ
œ œ
0

#œnœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œbœnœ
ϙ ϙ

& b#œ œbœ œ œ œ œ œ


4 2

œ œ œ œ œœ œ
nœ œ œ œ œ 3

III

œœ œ
0

œ œœœ
3
70
œ œ
3

œ œ
1 1 1 2

œ œ
4 4 0

b œ œ œ œ
0 1 4 1 3 ϙ

&
œœœ œ œ œ œ œ
œ
ϙ ϙ 2

1
II
œœœ œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ œœœ # œ Bœ œœœœ œ œ b œ ? Ÿ
9 I


4

œ
72
œ œœ
& b #œ nœœœœœ œ œ
3

œœ# œ n œ œ œ œ œœœœœ œ œ
? œnœœ

b œ n œ # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ # œ œ œ œ œ œ nœœ
œ œ œ œ œ
74
? b œœœ#œœ Bœœœœœ œ œ Bœ œ
œœ œœœ#œ
1


œ œ œ œ bœ œ
3
œœœœœ œ bœ œ œ œ
œnœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ?œ œ œ œ œ œ œ#œ nœ
76
B b #œ

œ œœ œ bœ œ œ œ œnœ œ œ œ# œ œœ #œ
œ œ œ œ
78
?b œ œ nœ#œ œ œ œ œ œ
œœ œœ œœ

œ œ # œ œ nœœ
10 œ œ #œœbœœ œ œbœ œ#œ œ
nœ œ œœœnœ
3 4
81
œœ ? #œœ #œ B
2 4 0

? œB œœ ? #œœ
4 4

b nœ #œ

84
œ œ œ œ œ# œ œ n œ œ œnœ# œ œ œ œ œ
? b #œ œ œ œ œ œ
1 1 0 ϙ

&œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
ϙ
3 2

œ #œ III II
II

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ#œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œnœbœ œ
86
œ œ œ
3

b nœ œ
3 3 ϙ

œ
& n œ œ#œ#œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
III
arpeggio simile
œ œ œ œ#œ
3
œ ˙
11 œ ˙ # œœ ˙ œ
nœœœ œ œ
2 2

œœ
88

œ œ œ œ ˙˙
ϙ

& b œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œœ ? ˙˙ œ ˙
3
1
1
0
II 1

b˙ ™
III

œœ œœ œ œ œ # œ ˙ ™
œ œ œ œ œ˙ ™ ™
œ̇ ™ œ œ œ̇ ™ œ œ
4

˙™ 12 0

# œ
™ #˙ ™
2
92
?b
1
# ˙ œ nœ œ œ̇ œ œ ˙
œ
4

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙™
2

˙
1
2
4 4 0
1 3

œ œ œœ˙
2 2

œ n œ œ œ #˙ 13 3 œ œ3 3 œ œ3 œ n œœ
4

˙™ # ˙™
2 1 ϙ 2 2 4 4 4

œ œ œ œ
1

# œ
? b œœœ œ nœ œ ˙ # œ œ̇
œ œ œ œ̇ œ œœ œœ ˙
˙™œ ™
1

œ
03
99

#œ œ ˙ œœ œœœœ œœ œ œ
0 1 1
3

3 3
1 1
3 4 1
4
0

n œœ œœœ # œ̇ œ œœ # ˙œœ n œ œœ #n œ̇ œ œ b œœ n œ œœ nœ̇ # œ


4

œ̇ œ b œ b œ
4 1 ϙ 2
3 3 2
3 3
106
? b ˙ œ ˙˙ &œ ? œœ œ #œ ˙
1 1

˙ œ ˙ œ œ œ B œ
1

˙ œ œ ˙ œ #œ œ
4

œ
2
1 1
1

˙™
IV

14

B b œ œ #œ ™ œ nœ #œ ™ œ nœ # œ œœ œ ? œ œœ nœœ
œ̇ # ˙ n œ̇ n ˙ b œ œ œ # œœ nn œœ œœ
4 4

113
˙™ œœ b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ̇ # œ
ϙ

œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ #œœ ˙
3
2 2 2

œ œ œ œ
II 1 1 1 1 3
4
3
œ œ œ œ œnœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
4
15 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œbœ
œ
121
? œ œ œ œ
b œ

123 œœœœœœœœœœœ œœœœœ œnœ# œ œ œœœœ œœœœ œ


?b œ œ œ œ œœ œœ

™ œj œ œ™ œj
1
2 3

œ œ œ
1

œœ œ œœ #œœ nœ œœ
0 3 0

? b œ œ œ#œ œ œ œ œbœ œ œ œ œœœ#˙˙˙


3 2 1 4

œœœ ˙˙ œœ bœ ?
125
œ
3 3

œ# œœ
3 2 4

œœ œœ œ n œœ
B
œ œœb œ
œ œ œ
1

0 2

b œ œ œ œ # œ ™ œj 16 œ ’
0 1

j
131
j
1

? b œ bœœ # œ œ œ ™ œ œ œ œ œ˙ ™
1 ϙ

˙
1

œ
ϙ ϙ 1

# œ œ
3 3

n ˙ œ œœ œ™
ϙ

œ œ #œ ˙ &œ™
1

˙ œ ˙ œ ϙ

17
œœ œœ j
# œ œœ œ œ ™ œ œ#œœ
137 3 1

& # œœ œœ™ œ™
ϙ 1
?
œ œ
ϙ 2 1 4

œ œ œ œ
3

œ œ œ œ œ ˙
4

œJ œœ œ œ ™ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ
2

Ϫ J
∏∏∏

J œ™ œJ III II

™ jj j œ™ œj
ϙ

œ œnœœj œ œ œœ™ œ œ œœj œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ


œ œ™ œœ œœœ œ œ œ œ œ
2 1 2

œ œ
3

œ
4 2 4
142
? ## œœ œ™ œ œ™ œœœœ œ œœ œ œ œ œ
3

œ™ œJ œ œ ™
B
œJ œ œ™ œJ J
0

III

œ œ œœjj œœœjjj ‰ Œ œœjj


ϙ

œ œ 18 œ œ
4

œ œ œ
3

œ œ œ œ ˙ œ œ œ
147
B ## œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œ œ ˙œ œ ? œ ‰ #œŒ # œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œnœ œ‰ #œœ
4

œœ J ‰ J
3 J

œjj ‰ Œ œ œr œ œ œ Bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ? œ œ œ œ œ
? ## œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œj
151

œ ‰ #œJ œœ œ œœ
R
œœ #œ œ
154
œœœœ œ#œ œ œ œ nœ
? ## œ œœœœœ œ œœœœ œœœœœœœœœ œœ

157
œ œœœœ œ œ œ œœœ
œ
ϙ

? ## œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
& œœ œœœœœ œ œ
ϙ

œœœ œ ?
2 ϙ 1

œ
1

œ œ
œœœ œ œœœœœ œœœœ 5
œ œœ
19
œœœ œ œ
160
œ œœœœœœ œœ
3

? ##
1

œœœœ
1

œ
0

œ
1

II I

œœœœœ
œ Bœ# œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ? œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
163 3 0 2

? ## œ
1

œ R œ
2 3

œ œ
1

II

166
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœ
? ## œ œ R œ œ œ œ R œ œ#œ œ œ Rœ œ
œ œ œ œ
r
œœ ≈ ‰ ≈ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œr ≈ ‰ ≈ œ œ # œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ
x4

≈ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ
2 ϙ
3 2

169 20 1 3


3

? ## œ R R œœœœ R
œœœœ≈≈
0

≈ ≈ ≈ R≈ œ œ œ œ ≈ ≈ R
R R R
1

r r
IV

r
œ ≈‰ ≈œœœœœœœ œœ
œ œœ œ
R œœœœœœœœœ R œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œr &œ œ œ œnœ œ œ
ϙ 1
172
? ##
≈ ≈ R R œœœœœœœ
R 3

21
j
≈‰ ≈ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ™
œ™ œœj
## œr
ϙ ϙ 1

?≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
175
?œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
1 3
ϙ

& œR R &œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœœ œœ œœ


≈ 0

œœ œ œœ™ œ œ œj œœ œ n œœ™ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ™ ™
jj jj
nœ œ œœ n œœ œ# œ œœ œœ œœ œœ œ œœ™ œ œ œœ œœœ œ œœœ ™œ œ œœœ
2 2

j œ
4 0 ϙ
2 ϙ 2 1 ϙ 2


ϙ
178
? ##
0 2
0 3


ϙ 4
4 3 3
3
4
III 3

œ œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ ™ œj 22œ
3

™ ™ ™
jj œ œ™ j
4

jj jj
œ œœ™™ œœ œœ œœ ™ œœ œ œ™ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ
183
n œ j n œ œ œ # œ œ œ œ œ œ
? ## œ œ œ œœ ˙
nœ ˙
œJ ˙ œ J œ ˙˙ œ
2

™ ™ œœ ™™
jj jj œ
œœjj j
? ## œ œœ ™™ œœ nœœœ œœœ™ ™™
œ œ™ œ œœ j œ œ œ œœ œ œ™
œœj œœ œ
#œœ™™
3
189

œœ œ œ œ
4 4

œ œ œ œ J
J œ
1

J J
2 1
ϙ 4
2

œœ™™ œœ jj œ œ ™ œ œ™
jj
™ œœjj œœ œœ œ˙ œ œjj
? ## œ œ œ ™ œ B œ œœ™ œœ œœ #œœ™™
23
œ œ œ œ
3 2 3

œ œ™ œ
3 3
193

œ ™ J
2

œ œ œ œ™
˙
J 0 ϙ 0 1
J 1
0
œJ
2
II
œ n œœ™™ œœjj œœ
4 arpeggio simile

œ œœ™™ œœj œœœœ œœ ™ œ œ œœjj ? œœ œœ œ œœ œœ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ


6 2 2

j
0 3
2 0 ϙ
24 3

œJ œ #œ ™ œJ
B # œœ
2 1
198 1
2 1

Ϫ
œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œœ œœ
Ϫ
1

# 3
œ™ œ
œJ
0 0
1
3 1
1
II

œ œ œ œ nœ
ϙ

œœ œ n œœ œœ
04

œ œœ # œ œœ œœ œœ œœ
2

œ œ œ œ œ
3 3 2 3 ϙ 3

? ## œœ œ
œ œœ œ
1 3 3
203
œ œ œ
1

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ 0

0
2
œ œ #œ œ œ œœ œ #œ œ
1
œ #œ
0
4

œ œj œ ™
œ
3

œj
œ˙ ™ œj œ™j œœœœ œj™™ œ œ#œ œ
25 œ ’
2 2

nnb œ œ™ œœj
Ϫ
2 3
208
? ## œœ œ ˙
œ n˙
œ™ œ œ œ œJœ ™ œ œ œœ
J J J
∏∏∏
1
0 4
0
III 0

œ œœ™jj™

œ # œ œ bœ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ
™ œ
j # œ œ
#œ #œœ œœJ ™ œ œ
œ œ œ
3
212
œ™ œ œ
3

?b œ
œJ ™
œ
1

Ϫ
J J œ

215 b œ ™ œ 26 # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
0

? b œœ ™
j # œ œ # œ œ œ™ œ œ
3

j
2

œ œ#œ œ œbœ œ œ n œ n œ™ nœ œ œœ
J™ œ œ œJ ™ œ
1

œœœ œ œ œ œœ œœ œ
3

# œ œ œ # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ # œ œ œ œ
0

œ
0

œ œ
2 1 3
218
?b œ œ œ
0 1

œ œ
3

œ
1 2

III

œœ œ œ œœ œ bœ œ œ
œœœœœ œ œ
4
221
?b
4
œ œ œ œ œ œb œ œ œ nœ
œnœ œœœ œ œ œ#œ

œ œœ bœ œ œœ
27
# œ œ n œ œ
? b œ œ œ œ œ œ#œ œ œ œ œ œ œnœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œbœ
1
224 1

œœœœœ
œ

227
# œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ
? b œ &œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
3
? œ œ œ 4

œ œ#œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ œœœœ 1
7

? œœ œ œœR œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œR œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœR œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œR œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ
4
229 1 1
1
4
4

b œ œ

28

? b œœ œ œ œR#œ œnœ œ#œ œnœ œ œœ œ œ œR#œ œnœ œ œ œbœ œ œœ œ œ œR œ œ#œ œ œ œ#œ œ


233

œ
? b œ œnœœ œ œœ œ#œœ œnœœ œ# œœ œ œ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ
236 2 4 1 4

œ
0 4
4

œœœ œ œ
29 œ
4

œ œ
2
3

? b œœ œnœœ œ œœ œ œœ œ#œœ œ œœ œ #œœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œnœœ œ œœ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ


3
239
œ
3 1
2 1 0

œ R 3 3 3 3 3 II

œ
œœœœ œœ œœ œ
x4

œ œ œ œ b œ
œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ
2 ϙ 1
242
?b œ œœœœœ œ œ œ œ
2 0

œ œ œ
1 0

œ
3

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3
IV 3

œ
# œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ œ# œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
ϙ ϙ
244 1

?b œ œ
1 2 3

œ
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

œœœœœœœ œbœ œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œbœ œœœœœœœ
246
?b œ œ #œ œnœ
3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3
3 3 3 3

nœ# œ œ nœ œ œ œ œ œ œœœ 30
™ j œœ œ˙™ œj œœ œ™ œj
œ œ œ
248
? b nœ#œ œ œœœ œœœ œ ‰ ˙˙ œœ #˙˙ œœ ˙˙
œ J

œ œ
? b œ œ #œœ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œœn#œœ œœ # œ œ #œ œ œ œ œnœœ œ œ œ™ œj ˙ ™™
252
œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ J œ œ œ ˙