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A
Project Report
On
Welfare schemes of Gujarat government

Submitted to:
Dr. Sarla Achuthan

Submitted By:
(Group no. ± 4, Div. ± A)

aahesh adepal (1901)


Sachin chokhawala (1912)
Jay Gandhi (1919)
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Table of Content

Particulars Page No.

J dural Worker Welfare Programme of Gujarat 4

Government
 -ntroduction 5
 Analysis and Findings 18
 Appendix 24

J chool Health Check up Programme of Gujarat 27

tate
 -ntroduction 28
 Analysis and Findings 37
 Appendix 44

J cholarship Programme of Gujarat Government 46

 -ntroduction 47
 Analysis and Findings 54
 Appendix 59
J cibliography 62
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desearch Methodology

1) Objective 
J Œo study existing welfare programme of Gujarat Government and try to analyze their
effectiveness.

J Œo study the satisfaction of beneficiaries of the schemes.

^) Data Collection

Primary Data:
Œhose data, which are collected first hand, either by the researcher or by someone else
especially for the purpose of study is known as primary data. Primary data is original source
from which the researcher directly collects data have not been previously collected. -n the
present study, primary data has been collected using questionnaire. For the purpose of
collecting the same, respondents have been selected randomly. -n the study, primary data
plays a vital role for analysis, interpretation, conclusions and suggestions.
For our project we have prepared a questionnaire and conduct a survey through convenience
sampling method as well as judgment sampling method.

econdary Data
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ºewspapers, magazines, government websites, internet etc are being used as secondary data.
Secondary data are that data which are collected for another research and objective and which
are readily available..

Î) ampling Method
Sampling is simply the process of learning about the population on the basis of sample.
A sample is a subset of population unit.

We have adopted the convenience sampling as well as judgment sampling techniques.


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) desearch Approach
Descriptive research method

5) ample ize
We have decided to research 3 scheme of Gujarat Government and we have chosen different
sample size for each of them. We have selected 100 respondents for Scholarship Programme
of Gujarat Government, 100 Welfare Scheme of Gujarat Government and 25 for School
Health Check up Programme from local community from various Schools and Students.

6) Data collection tool


Œhis study is based on primary data collected through questionnaire. Questionnaire, used for
collecting data is close as well as open ended. Œhis type closed and open ended question will
be helpful to extract the results within our limits. Sample questionnaire is shown below.
Approach to the Problem. 

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Rural Workers Welfare Programme of

Gujarat Government

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1. Introduction
Out of total workforce 90% of the workers are working in unorganized sector like
agriculture, salt pan industries, fisheries, forestry, plantation, and livestock. Conditions of
unorganized rural workers are pathetic and continue to deteriorate further due to uncertainties
of employment and migration. Since the workers in the unorganized rural sector in general
suffers from low earning and lack of stability, it has not been possible to extend them the
benefit of a contribution oriented or employers liability oriented social security scheme.
Various social security schemes are implements by the Govt. of Gujarat through Rural
Workers Welfare Board which are aimed to ameliorate the conditions of rural labourers, but
the result is not to the expectation, because the government efforts alone would not bring
change in the conditions of these poorest among the poor like landless agriculture labourers
and salt pan workers. What is required is the creation of awareness and leadership among this
class of people, therefore organizing them is the most important task. Organizing rural
Labour is not an easy task as working conditions vary from place to place as well as workers
are scattered over a large area and are subjected to exploitation and other vices like liquor and
bondage etc. Legislations for such rural Labour have only marginal effect. G.R.W.W.Board
has initiated several measures for awareness among rural workers as well as to organize them
through the rural workers welfare centres. Social Security measures which gives umbrella
protection to them but what is required is dedication and sustained efforts on the part of
executives vis-avis-the active participation of labourers themselves.

-n order to prevent economical exploitation of 90% of the rural and unorganized


workers, consisting 15% of the total population of Gujarat state, and to avail them the
different social, education and economical developmental schemes run by the state
Government, various measures have been initiated by the State Government. Gujarat is the
first State to run autonomous and individual offices like Rural Labour Commissinonerate for
legal protection of rural workers and Gujarat Rural Workers Welfare Board for the welfare
activities

2.Objective of the coard


Œhe main objective of the Boards are :

p  Œhe socio. Economic uplift of rural workers.


p  Create an awareness & instil self confidence
p  aobile the rural workers for the protection or their interest and
p  Enable the rural workers to get absorbed in the main stream of rural society.

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3.Organisation Chart

4.[ield Offices
At the state level head quarter the Board has got an supporting staff. At the Dist. Level
however, there is no separate establishment of the Board, but the Dist. aachinery of the
Rural Labour Commissionerate headed by the Government Labour are made responsible for
administrative & financial working at the district level. Œhe honorary district organizer helps
Co-ordinating work.

Œhe Board is at present run 307 rural workers welfare centers. About 74 centers are
functioning in the tribal area. Œhe Board has also implemented various schemes for salt
workers at the cost of Rs. 130 lacs. 45 salt workers welfare centers are setup in the salt
production area.

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5.Policies of the department


Œhe G.R.W.W.Board is an autonomous organization registered under the societies
Registration Act 1860. Œhe Board is headed by the Labour ainister of the state. aaximum
number of 9 official and 14 non-official members are appointed by the Government of
Gujarat.

At present 7 official and 12 non-official members are appointed. Œhe society is basically
formed to provide for welfare and social security for rural workers as well as to create
awareness and leadership among them. Œhus over all development of rural working class is
the ultimate goal. For this purpose Board has initiated few social security schemes,
coordinate with the other Government agencies concerning rural development, rural health,
family welfare and social defence activities. Board has also used to organize the workers by
forming self help groups of the rural workers at village level.

6. dole / desponsibility of the coard

J Role as a service delivery agency for various welfare and social security scheme of
the state & Central Government.
J Œrought the Welfare Center providing linkage between the Govt. agency and rural
poor workers. Work as a window for the rural poor where they get necessary
information & guidance.
J Role as a pressure group by organizing the rural Labour. Œhe village level centers
educate the rural masses for programmes and provisions of the various Labour laws
meant for their protection.

At Rural Workers Welfare Centers activities like Balwadi for children's, Library, first
Aid and Recreation, Cultural and Sport activities are also performed. At each center an
honorary organizer, a part teacher and one lady attendant is appointed. Œhe honorary
organizes is generally a person from the rural society belongs to that particular area. Each
center submitting a monthly progress report in a well devised Performa, the works is
reviewed every month at district level as well as by the Rural Labour commissioner at state
meeting. Œhe last two years progress under the main activities of the centres is as under.

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7.Number of beneficiaries of the activities

Year No. of calwadi Adult ports Cultural Loan Aware-ness


Centers Activities Education Activities Activities ubsidy Campus
Activities
2006-2007 307 7695 3023 48019 26658 7404 40032
2007-2008 307 9988 3089 50026 26052 8279 44373

8. cenefits Provided to the Workers


J [inancial Assistance in erious Disease
Under this scheme agriculture labours and rural workers are provided up to Rs. 500/- in
the form of medicine, in the case of serious deceased like Œ.B. Censer, Leprosy etc. Apart
from this is per the requirement financial assistance can be sanctioned from social security
fund.

ºo. Year Beneficiaries Expenditure (Rs. -n Lakh)

1 1999-00 2329 2.95

2 2000-01 2675 5,07

3 2001-02 2030 6.21

4 2002-03 1059 5.03

5 2003-04 6510 15.99

6 2004-05 6571 42.94

7 2005-06 2045 12.45

8 2006-07 1301 10.91

9 2007-08 1560 18.74

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J [inancial Assistance cheme for the welfare and development


activities to agriculture labour and rural workers
Œhe purpose of this scheme is to provide financial assistance to the government, semi
government, voluntary organizations, union and other organizations, Engaged in the
organization, development and welfare of rural workers for the social, economical, education,
health and cultural development of agriculture labour s and rural workers. Under this scheme
Government and semi government organization are provided 100% assistance, 755 assistance
to workers unions connected with development of agriculture labours and rural workers, and
505 assistance to other institutes. Balvadi and crèches are run with the co-operation of
voluntary organization like SEVA and others.

Progressive figures of Last Five years:


ºo. Year ceneficiaries Assistance Given (in Rs.)

1 2003-04 1675 237000

2 2004-05 403 97839

3 2005-06 450 260502

4 2006-2007 450 157500

5 2007-2008 450 156175

J [inancial assistance cheme to rural workers for tour


Financial Assistance of 50% limited to Rs. 5000/-(Rupees five thousand only) is given to
rural workers, so that they can pay visit to religious, historical and educational places during
their spare hours.

Progressive figures of Last Five years


ºo. Year Beneficiaries Assistance Given (in Rs.)

1 2003-04 354 30000

2 2004-05 728 64000

3 2005-06 750 70900

4 2006-07 466 41893

5 2007-08 350 30000

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J Welfare scheme for Inter tate and Inter tate Migrant dural
Workers
Œhe problem of inter and inter state migrant rural workers are required to be tackled
with special care. Œhese workers mainly comprise categories of sugarcane workers, salt
workers and to some extent tobacco and agricultural labourers. Looking to the special
circumstance and working condition, below mentioned welfare scheme will be
implemented through the Board.

1. Seasonal Balvadi-cum-crench at or near work site, providing nutrious food to the
children between age group of 0 - 6 years.
2. First aid box scheme at seasonal Balvadis.
3. Assistance in opening of fair price ration shop to the maximum limit of Rs. 5000.
4. Œo provide water tanks for the purpose of hygienic drinking water, to the
maximum limit of Rs. 5000/- per tank.
5. Œo assist in the construction of residential houses and rest sheds to the maximum
limit of Rs. 25000.
6. ºon formal education.

All above scheme are to be implemented through responsible voluntary agencies and
with the owners who are agreed to share 255 of the scheme as their contribution and take
responsibility of maintenance.

J Welfare scheme for alt Workers

State Government has implemented following various scheme for the 45801 Salt
workers locates in 35 Œalukas of 13 Districts of the state through Gujarat Rural Welfare
Board.

(a) Scheme of salt Workers Welfare Centers:


Under this scheme, 45 Salt workers welfare centers are established in the salt production
areas. Activities of Balvadi, library primary health, sports and cultural are run in such centers.
Œhe honorary workers of these centers are making publicity and fill up the forms of schemes
of labour and other departments.

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(b) Seasonal Balvadi-cum-Ghodiyaghar Scheme:


During the salt production season, Balvadi-cum-Ghodiyaghar are run for the salt workers
children at the salt production places. Œhere are such 50 balvadi-cum-ghodiyaghar in the
state; while at 14 places where the residential quarters of salt workers are near the salt
production places, balvadi-cum-ghodiyaghar are sanctioned on the permanent basis.

(c) First Aid Boxes for Salt Workers:


130 boxes of first aid boxes are provided to avail the salt workers, the emergency
treatment at the working place, and due training is also provided to such workers. aedicines
are provided intermittently.

(d) Kacha/ Pacca Quarter scheme for salt workers:


Under this scheme, financial assistance of 75% is given for the construction of Pacca
house on their plot, so as to protect them from for cold, heat and rain. Œill now 474 tents of
tar paulin have been provided at the coast of Rs. 8.28 lakhs.

Year Permission Granted ºo. Of Quarter Amount paid

2002-03 1022 282 28.07

2003-04 62 453 43.95

2004-05 2572 197 19.59

2005-06 1589 878 81.20

2006-07 1222 450 45.02

2007-08 324 558 58.48

(e) Quarters for Rest Room scheme for salt Workers:


Assistance is given for Rest Room construction Rs. 36000 per such unit are sanctioned
the Board gives 75% of the rest 25% to be bear by the salt unit. Œhus such Rest Room were
built in Valsad District during 1997-98 and the Board had expended amount of Rs. 54000.

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(f) -dentity Cards to Salt Workers:


Out of 45801 salt workers in the State the work of providing - card to 18738 Salt workers
is on hand of which 10449 salt workers have already been given - cards till aarch 2004 . Œhe
same is under process.

(g) Scheme for total development of salt workers:


Under this scheme activities like awareness camp, financial assistance for the serious
disease, tour arrangement, welfare, development and organizing activities are run.

J Awareness Camp for dural Workers


Œhe awareness camps for the agricultural labours and rural workers is hold to informal
awareness about different welfare scheme of Government and other agencies

Progressive figures
Year ºo.of Camps Beneficiaries Expenditure (Rs. -n lakh)

1999-00 234 36513 1.54

2000-01 540 56587 2.04

2001-02 202 31331 2.47

2002-03 170 21745 10.1

2003-04 211 30868 1.80

2004-05 188 24565 1.18

2005-06 302 43700 2.24

2006-07 279 37674 2.28

2007-08 297 42373 2.40

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J Group Insurance cheme [or [ishermen and [orest Workers


Œhis group insurance scheme is in operation since 1993-94

Under this scheme insurance of Rs. 3000/- in the case of natural death and Rs.6000/-in
the case of accidental death is provided. From 16-10-95, in the case of accidental death Rs.
25000/-, in the case of complete disability Rs. 25000/-, and in the case of partial disability Rs.
12500/-, is benefited in these scheme.

Progressive figure under this scheme is as below:


No Year [ishermen Amount [orest Amount
cheme Paid (ds. In workers paid (ds. In
ceneficiaries Lakh) cheme lakh)

1 2000-01 33 1.05 44 0.36

2 2001-02 66 2.13 75 2.31

3 2002-03 149 4.65 242 7.44

4 2003-04 206 6.71 431 13.12

5 2004-05 144 5.20 470 14.98

6 2005-06 199 10.59 774 25.68

7 2006-07 608 111.96 812 26.56

8 2007-08 244 13.26 880 29.14

J Group insurance cheme for landless agricultural labour


Under this scheme, landless agricultural labour between the age group of 18 to 60 years
are insured for Rs. 1000/- in the case of natural death, Rs. 2000/- in the case of accidental
death, Rs. 750/- in the case of total handicap and Rs. 500/- in the case of partial handicap.
Beside this, additional insurance of Rs. 2000/- is given by the Government of -ndia, in the
case of the death of head of the family member of the landless agricultural labours.

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Progressive figure during last nine years


ºo. Year Claim Settled by L-C Amount Paid By L-C

Central State Central State

1 1999-00 11407 8239 115.59 141.88

2 2000-01 17301 9147 176.75 180.88

3 2001-02 20887 11010 213.13 220.16

4 2002-03 21427 14046 217.56 281.28

5 2003-04 25038 7276 255.95 345.52

6 2004-05 21903 5348 224.95 306.96

7 2005-06 22095 5062 227.59 301.28

8 2006-07 21673 5552 223.53 311.04

9 2007-08 21122 763 220.57 175.26

J Group Insurance cheme for alt workers


Under this scheme, 45801 unorganized salt workers between the age group of 18 to 60
years are provided insurance coverage of Rs. 3000/- in the case of natural death and Rs
6000/- in the case of accidental death. From 16-10-95 Rs. 25000/- in case of accidental death.
25000/- in case of complete disability and Rs 12500/- in the partial disability is provided.

Progressive figure under this scheme is as below

ºo. Year Beneficiaries Amount paid

1 2002-03 570 17.52

2 2003-04 620 19.38

3 2004-05 594 20.46

4 2005-06 628 33.58

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5 2006-07 699 31.47

6 2007-08 731 34.22

J hramik uraksha cheme

For Rural and Urban unorganized workers;

State Government has launched the largest group insurance scheme first time in the
country, commenced from date 26-1-2002 covering 70 lakh unorganized agricultural labours
and rural workers of 14 to 70 years of age group of urban and rural area of the state, which
provide insurance of Rs. 20000/- in the case of accidental death and permanent disability and
Rs. 10000/- in the case of partial disability. Œhe workers in the field of agriculture, live stock
,forestation, fisheries, plantation, horticulture and their allied activities as well as workers
engaged in the occupation of mineral ,mines and quarry, processing, serving and repairing,
construction and all the other workers, who are not covered under the employees insurance
scheme and workmen compensation Act.

Progressive figures of Last Five years:


Yea First Seco Œhir Fourt Fifth Sixt
r polic nd d h polic h
y polic polic polic y polic
y y y y

1 2 1 2 1 2 1 2 1 2 1 2

200 273 54.2 - - - - - - - - - -


3-04 0

200 271 73.4 126 25.1 - - - - - - - -


4-05 0 0

200 - - 497 91.1 328 65.5 - - - - - -


5-06 0 0

200 23 460 - - 380 75.9 842 168 - - - -


6-07 0

200 - - 16 2.90 223 44.4 427 84.4 781 154.7 1343 268.6
7-08 0 0 0 0

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9.Activities of Gujarat dural Workers Welfare coard:


Gujarat Rural Workers Welfare Board is functioning for the social economical
educational and cultural development of agriculture and rural workers of the state. -n the
Gujarat State 307 rural workers welfare center ad 45 salt workers welfare centers are run by
the Board. -n these centers the activities like Blwadi, library first aid and recreational and
cultural activities are performed. Œhe Honorary Organizer of the center visits the villages for
the implementation of social security schemes as well as creation of awareness among the
rural workers.

The ten years progress under the main activity is as under:

Years No. of calwadi Adult ports Cultural Loan


centers Activities Education Activities Activities Cases

1998-99 163 5,754 3,829 20,926 23,191 1,110


1999-00 207 6,185 4,159 28854 42263 4597
2000-01 207 7432 11578 50953 38090 8789
2001-02 207 7575 18730 58394 41567 10692
2002-03 207 7445 8600 50442 34561 8710
2003-04 207 7268 4407 48611 28074 7579
2004-05 207 7103 4112 46157 27385 6790
2005-06 207 7120 3409 48909 25251 7647
2006-07 307 7695 3023 4809 26658 7404
2007-08 307 9988 3089 50026 26052 8279

10. Protective measures for the rural workers


Following acts are being implemented by the office of the Rural Labour
Commissioner, to avoid exploitation of agricultural labour and get them minimum wages.

(a) Œhe ainimum Wages Act, 1948.

(b) Œhe Bonded Labour System (Abolition).

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(a) Œhe Government of Gujarat has fixed the following rates of minimum wages for
agricultural Labours from time to time.

r. No. Date of Implementation date of Minimum Wages


Daily Annual
1 15/08/72 3.00 1,200
2 05/01/76 5.50 2,000
3 21/10/82 9.00 3,200
4 04/02/86 11.00 4,000
5 01/08/90 15.00 5,400
6 01/04/96 34.00 12,500
7 01/04/2002 50.00 18250

Œhe Government has fixed the equal rate of minimum wages for male and female.

An advisory Committee, consisting of employees, workers, Social workers and government


official is forms at the state level and district level for the effective implementation of
minimum Wages act. Œhe group meeting of agriculture labours and farmers with Govt.
Labour Officer and Assistant Govt. Labour Officer are being arranged at village level. -f
required, legal action is also initiated.

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Analysis and [indings


1 Are you paid wages according to minimum wages act, i.e. Rs. 100?

YES ºO
46 54

46 YES

54 NO

2 Are you aware of government running various welfare activities?

YES ºO
37 63

37
YES
NO
63

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3 Are you with any kind of insurance by government?

YES ºO
31 69

31

YES


69

4. Do you think government should promote this scheme more?

YES ºO
89 11

11

YES


89

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5. Do you know about various awareness program held by government?

YES ºO
37 63

37
YES

63

6 -f yes, have you attended any?

YES ºO
73 27

27

YES


73

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7 are you aware of government giving financial assistance in serious dieses?

YES ºO
24 76

24

YES
NO

76

8 -f yes, have you or your family got that assistance anytime?

YES ºO
79 21

21

YES
NO

79

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9 Have you registered yourself to Gujarat Government¶s rural workers welfare scheme?

YES ºO
16 84

16

YES
NO

84

10 -f yes, is the procedure easy?

YES ºO
22 78

22

YES
NO

78

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[indings
Conditions of unorganized rural workers are pathetic and continue to deteriorate further due
to uncertainties of employment and migration. Since the workers in the unorganized rural
sector in general suffers from low earning and lack of stability, it has not been possible to
extend them the benefit of a contribution oriented or employers liability oriented social
security scheme. Various social security schemes are implements by the Govt. of Gujarat
through Rural Workers Welfare Board which are aimed to ameliorate the conditions of rural
labourers, but the result is not to the expectation, because the government efforts alone would
not bring change in the conditions of these poorest among the poor like landless agriculture
labourers and salt pan workers.

Œhis scheme provides for upliftment of socio economic level of rural worker. By imparting
education and training programme, it helps to increase the confidence of the workers. Œhe
village level centres educate the rural masses for programmes and provisions of the various
Labour laws meant for their protection. At Rural Workers Welfare Centres activities like
Balwadi for children's, Library, first Aid and Recreation, Cultural and Sport activities are also
performed. At each centre an honorary organizer, a part teacher and one lady attendant is
appointed.

But we also observed that there is mismanagement of fund and the benefits not reaching to
the end users. Œhey are not much aware about various programmes ran under this scheme and
as such they are not able to attend that programmes. Œhe procedure for getting various benefit
are lengthy and tough and there are corruption in the department.

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Appendix

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A 

         

 
-  g by y
w b   s  y     w b
s    
s
y p
ps  y.

   w  :

g  :

Ag :

G  :

E
 :

1 A y
p wg s    g   
 wg s   . . Rs. 100?

Y s 

2 A y
w  g    
 g 
s w    s?

Y s 

3 A y
w  y    s
 by g   ?

Y s 

4. D y
  g    s
p s s      ?

Y s 

5. D y
 w b
 
s w ss pg  by g   ?

Y s 

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6 - y s  y
  y?

Y s


7  y
w  g    g g    sss  s 
s  s s?

Y s


8 - y s  y
 y
  y g  sss  y ?

Y s


9 H y
 gs  y
s   G
 G   s 
 w s w  s   ?

Y s


10 - y s s  p
 sy?

Y s


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School Health Check up Programme

Of Gujarat State

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1. Introduction
Developing the human capital of nations especially the intellectual, social, mental, and
physical abilities of children and adolescents is fundamental to the improvement of the
quality of life of the citizens. Developing human capital is also critical for nations to enjoy
political stability and economic growth. ºations that have invested in health and education
have tended to experience corresponding economic development.

Furthermore, education and health are inseparable. Student's health affects not only their
cognitive performance in school, but also their ability to attend and stay in school over the
years. Œhose young people who attend primary schools have better chances of survival. Œo
ensure attendance of our children and to enhance their ability to learn, their health issues need
to be addressed continuously. -t is in this regard that the public health system of a nation has
an important role to play. Health agencies working with educational systems have the
potential to reach billions of young people worldwide.

Accordingly, in 1909, Sir Sayajirao Gaikwad, King of Baroda, started School Health
Programme in Baroda region. -t was the first school health program in the Country. -n 1946
the Bhore Committee reported that School Health Services were practically not existent in
-ndia and where they existed they were in an underdeveloped stage. -n 1953, the secondary
Education committee emphasized the need for medical examination of students and school
feeding programme.

-n keeping with these developments and to ensure good health for our school children the
state of Gujarat has launched a major School Health Programme. Œhis is the single, largest,
health programme operating in the state of Gujarat for last 8 years.

^. Government of India Initiative


Œhe Govt. of -ndia launched the µSpecial School Health Check-up Programme¶ in the year
1996 in coordination of Department of Health & Family Welfare and Department of
Education for school going children of Primary Schools with the following objectives;

 ' Detection of health related problems that are commonly occurring amongst primary
school children
 ' Screening of children for appropriate referral,
 ' Building of health awareness in the community through primary school children and
 ' Follow-up arrangements for detailed check-up and treatment of referral cases at Govt.
Health Facilities

-t was a 6-days programme throughout the country and the aulti-Purpose Health Workers
undertook primary screening. Referral services were provided at the Primary Health Centers.
Œhe programme was however discontinued after sometime.

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Î. Government of Gujarat Initiative


Govt. of Gujarat, Department of Health in collaboration with Education Department started
innovative School Health Programme since 1997, wherein primary examination was done by
medical officers of primary health care system.

A State level steering committee, under the chairmanship of Health ainister was formed for
planning School Health Program. Chief Secretary, Additional Chief Secretary (health),
Additional Chief Secretary (finance), Additional Chief Secretary (education), Health
commissioner and aembers of legislative Assembly are other members of the steering
committee.

Œhe steering committee takes important policy decisions regarding School Health Programme
and decides the date as well as the time duration of the programme and. Before start up
meetings of CDHOs, CDaOs, RDDs and programme officers are called and detailed
discussions held for effective implementation of the School Health Programme. -ndividual
aedical Officers prepare aicro plans at the PHC level which include date, time and place of
examination, number of schools and number of school children to be examined. District
health authorities collect and compile micro plans and send the same to the state authorities
for compilation and analysis.
At the state level Health Education Bureau compiles and analyzes all -nformation and
prepares a state level master plan, which includes interlaid the requirement of;

 ' aanpower
 ' Drugs
 ' -EC aaterials
 ' Stationary
 ' Contingencies

aedical officers with their teams examine all school going and -.C.D.S. beneficiaries in the
primary schools and anganwadies. Children with minor ailments are treated on the spot in the
school. Children requiring examination by specialists are sent to the related referral centers
where different medical experts like ophthalmic surgeon, physician, pediatrician, dentist, skin
specialist and E.º.Œ. surgeons examine and treat them. Œhose children who require spectacles
are provided the same free of cost. Children suffering from Heart, Kidney and Cancer
diseases are examined by super-specialty hospitals. Operative and other treatment are given
free of cost. Œransportation is also provided by the state Govt.

. cudget
Œhe state Government allocates a budget of Rs 500 lacs for School Health Programme, under
plan budget.

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5. ervice at a Glance

(A)No. of beneficiaries

r. No. Year Total children pot referral spectacles


children examined treated services
1. 2000-01 8826056 8262880 1329889 38146 6420
2. 2001-02 8874693 8375014 1453584 47344 11424
3. 2004-03 9184141 8767421 1338266 46499 34582
4. 2005-06 8900345 8507684 1617828 75168 38424
5. 2006-07 8692436 8324661 1425999 72241 40671
6. 2007-08 8832343 8434997 1226213 53913 37162

(c) No. of children given treatment on the sport for various common diseases

Year Anemia Worm Night Ear cabies coils Poor Dental


Infestati blindn discharge Vision Proble
on ess m
2002-03 402658 310811 18335 71594 36510 185329 39487 114947
2003-04 470841 348014 21749 81540 37542 213853 42134 129585
2004-05 409142 267583 15798 74400 38423 222639 38565 97267
2005-06 519378 360659 - 88287 120570 73235 141272
2006-07 446126 362230 - 71017 94556 91604 119703
2007-08 323099 333489 - 54880 84155 67926 94390

(C)No. of children provided referral services

Year Pediatrician Ophthalmic Dental kin E.N.T.


surgeon surgeon specialist surgeon
2002-03 8600 14519 7019 2257 3176
2003-04 9332 20234 8186 3591 4283
2004-05 11139 21142 5737 3651 3669
2005-06 17792 32480 10439 4973 6303
2006-07 15833 28835 8151 5874 5353
2007-08 14341 22321 5602 5126 3891

32
c   c






C il i R l i i

3891
5126 14341
P  
5602
 sur 
 sur 

 s s
22321
  sur   



 º  il i   i
  ili


 T li  º  il 

    


    
    
    
   

 
 
  


4500
4000
3500
3000
2500
2000
1500   
1000   r  r 
500
0





33

c   c







Eº  il i 
l

º   i  


    
    
   
   

    
 
  
T l   

º  il i 

 º   iili 


 li 
il il
     
    
   

    
  
  
 
   

T l   



º             

2007-2008

2006-2007

200-2006

2004-200   r 

2003-2004

2002-2003

0 20 40 60 80 100


34

c  c

   

(1)Difficulties faced by chool health Coordinators while


implementation of program

Sr. Difficulties faced by School health ºO %


ºo. Coordinators
1 Less time per student 9 4.1
2 -nadequate drug supply 9 4.1
3 ºo specialist 4 1.8
4 -nadequate staff 15 6.9
5 -mproper Referral Services 16 7.4
6 Others 72 33.3
7 ºo Difficulties 92 42.4
(n=217)
aajority of the school health coordinators did not face any difficulties during the
school health program while some of the school health coordinators reported difficulties like
improper referral services, inadequate staff, inadequate drug supply and less time given by
medical officers for health examination per student etc.

(^) tudents¶ awareness about the chool health program

Sr. ºo. Details ºo %


1 Health check up 160` 95.2
2 Others 8 4.8
(n=168)
aost of the students [160 (95.2%)] opined that health check up was the main aim of
program.

(Î)Difficulties faced by students because of chool health program

Sr. Difficulties ºO %
ºo.
1 Disturbance in study and teaching schedule hampered 6 3.5
2 ºo Difficulties 152 90.5
3 Others 10 6
(n=168)
aajority of the students 152 (90.5%) opined that they did not face any difficulty
during the ongoing school health program. School health program not only provides
treatment to sick children, but also health education which is considered the backbone of any
successful program. Beneficiaries accept the program only when they are aware about the
benefits of the program. Œhis reflects the importance of health education that is to be
providing to students

35
c  c

   

6. District wise ummery of the Programme


6.1 urendranagar District

-n all the schools of this district, School Health Check Up was going at the time of
Process Evaluation. Adequate light, space, ventilation and sitting facility was there in all the
schools. Banners were displayed in 11 (78.6%) schools. Overall impression of Health
Education was very good in 1 (7.1%) school while it was good in 4 (28.6%) schools. -n
13(92.9%) schools weighing scale and Snellen¶s chart were present, while stethoscope was
present with all the health check up teams and torch was present with 11(78.6%) teams. All
teams had the height measuring equipment along with -FA tablets, aebendazole and
Antipyretics. One team (7.1%) did not have ORS packets while two (14.3%) teams did not
have vitamin-A solution and Eye/ear drops. BB lotion was not available in 5 (35.7%) schools
with health check up teams. -n 12 (85.7%) schools anemia was identified correctly. -n 13
(92.9%) schools medical officers were having skill to identify Worm -nfestation correctly. -n
5 (35.7%) schools medical officers did not inquire about diarrhea. -n 6 (46.2%) schools
medical officers did not have the skill for identification of vitamin-A deficiency while in 7
(53.8%) schools, medical officers did not have the skill for identification of visual defect and
in 2 (15.4%) schools it was done it with an error. -n 9 (64.3%) schools, medical officers did
not look for ear discharge, while in 2 (14.3%) it was done with an error. -n 8 (57.1%) , 5
(35.7%) and 9 (64.3%) schools, medical officers did not have the skill to identified skin
problems, dental problems and fluorosis respectively, while in 1 (7.1%) school it was done
with an error. -n 11 (78.6%) and 12 (85.7%) schools, medical officers did not screen for
goiter and leprosy respectively, while 1 (7.1%) it was done with an error. -n 3 (21.4%)
schools relevant Health Advise was not given. -n 9 (64.3%) schools average time given by
medical officers for Health Check Up was ” 1 minutes, in 3(21.4%) schools it was 2-3
minutes and in two (14.3%)school it was >3 minutes. Œhe clinical and counseling skill of
medical officers was very good in 2 (14.3%) schools, good in 3 (21.4%) schools, average in 8
(57.1%) and poor in 1 (7.1%) school. -n 2 (14.3%) schools medical officers did have the shill
to identify learning disability and in 4 (28.6%) schools medical officers did have the skill to
identify physical disability. All the schools were having referral card and 9 (64.3%) schools
were having record card. -n all schools information regarding referral place was given.

36
c  c

   

6.^ Kutch district

-n all the 24 schools of Kutch district, School Health Check up was going on at the
time of visit for Process Evaluation. Adequate space, light and sitting facility was available in
all the schools. One school (4.2%) did not have adequate ventilation as per the requirement.
Banners were displayed in only 5 (20.8%) schools. Overall Health Education impression was
good in 3 (13%) schools, average in 15 (65.2 %) schools, poor in 3 (13%) and very poor in 2
(8.7%) schools. -n all 24 schools school health teams had the stethoscope while Snellen¶s
chart was available in only one (4.2%) school. -n 18 (75%) and 14 (58.3%) schools weighing
scale and torch were available respectively. 6 (25%) teams did not have Height aeasuring
Equipments. Almost all teams had Vitamin A solution, -FA tablets, aebendazole, and
Process Evaluation - School Health Check up (2008-09)

Antipyretics with them along with ORS packets and antibiotics present with 22 (91%)
teams. aore than three fourth of the health checkup teams carried Eye/ear drops and BB
lotion. -n all schools anemia was identified correctly. -n 13 (54.2%) schools, medical officers
did not have the skill to identify Worm -nfestation or inquire about diarrhea, while in 1
(4.1%) school it was done with an error. -n 8 (33.3%) schools, medical officers did not have
the skill for vitamin A deficiency identification. ºot a single medical officer did have the
skill for identification of visual defects. -n 19 (79.2%) schools, medical officers did not look
for ear discharge, while in 1 (4.1%) school it was seen with an error. -n 8 (33.3%) schools,
medical officers did have the skill to identified skin problems, while in many 5 (20.8%)
schools it was done with an error. -n 2 (8.3%) schools, medical officers did not look for
dental problems, while in 1 (4.2%) school it was seen with an error. -n 13 (54.2%) schools,
medical officers did not look for fluorosis, while 1 (4.2%) has seen with an error. -n 6 (25%)
schools, medical officers did not look for goiter, while in 4 (16.7%) schools it was done with
an error. -n 15 (62.5%) schools, medical officers did not identify leprosy, while in 4 (16.7%)
schools it was done with an error. -n 7 (29.2%) schools relevant Health Advise was not given.
-n 4 (16.7%) schools average time taken by medical officers in examination of
children was ” 1 minute and in 20 (83.3%) schools it was 2-3 minutes. Œhe clinical and
counseling skill of medical officers was very good in 6(25%), average in 17(70.8%) and very
poor 1 (4.2%) schools. Only one or two medical officers had the skill to identify learning and
physical disability respectively. -n 23 (95.85%) schools record cards and referral cards were
available with Health Check up Œeam. -n 23 (95.85%) schools information about referral
places was given.

37
c  c

   

6.Î canaskantha District

Out of the 30 schools, School Health Check up was going on in 29 (96.7%) schools at
the time of visit for Process Evaluation. -n almost majority of the schools adequate space,
light, ventilation and sitting facility was available. -n 20 (69%) schools banner was displayed.
Health education impression was very poor in 10 (34.5%) schools, poor in 5 (17.2%), average
in 12 (41.4%) and good in only 2 (6.9%). -n only 17 (58.6%) schools weight scale was
available and weight was taken correctly. -n 13 (44.8%) schools, Snellen¶s chart was present
while stethoscope was present with 28 (96.5%) teams. Œorch was available with only 9
(30.1%) teams and more than half 17 (58.6%) school health checkup teams did not have
Height aeasurement Equipment. -n almost 26 (89.6%), 27 (93.1%), 17 (58.6%) and 27
Process Evaluation - School Health Check up (2008-09)

(93.1%) schools Vitamin-A tablets, -FA tablets, ORS packets and Antibiotics were
present respectively and 17 (58.6%), 27(93.1%), 13 (44.8%) and 28 (96.5%) teams had BB
lotion, aebendazole, Eye/Ear drops and Antipyretic respectively.

-n 5 (17.2%) schools anemia was not identified while in 3 (10.4%) schools it was
identified with error. -n 12 (41.4%) schools worm infestation was not identified and in 1
(3.4%) school it was identified with error. -n 18 (62.1%) schools inquiry for diarrhea was not
carried out. -n 17 (68%) schools visual defects were not identified and in 2 (8%) schools it
was identified with error. -n 21 (72.4%) schools ear discharge was not identified and in 5
(17.2%) schools it was identified with error. -n 18 (62.1%) schools skin problems were not
identified. -n 13 (48.1%) schools dental problems were not identified while in 1 (3.7%)
school it was identified with error. -n 16 (61.5%) schools fluorosis was not identified while in
22 (75.9%) schools goiter was not identified and in 23 (79.3%) schools leprosy was not
identified. -n 14 (48.3%) schools relevant health related advices were not given to school
children by medical officers. aedical officers took less than one minute in examination of
school children in 11 (39.3%) schools while in 14 (50%) schools they took 2-3 minutes. Œhe
clinical and counseling skill of medical officers in 2 (6.9%) schools was very good while it
was good in only 5 (17.2%) schools. -n 23 (79.3%) and 24 (82.7%) schools medical officers
did not have skill to identify learning and physical disability. -t was observed that in 22
(75.9%) schools record cards were available while in 28 (96.6%) schools referral cards were
available with the health check up team. -n 27 (96.4%) schools medical officers gave
information about referral place

38
c  c

   

Analysis and [indings

39
c  c

   

1=Very Poor,
2=Poor,
3=aoderate,
4=Good,
5=Very Good.

1. Awareness about the Programme

Answers 1 2 3 4 5

Percentages 12 11 33 37 7

45
40
35

30

25
20
15
10

0
1 2 3 4 5

40
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2. Availability of aedical Equipments and Drugs

Answers 1 2 3 4 5

Percentages 15 37 28 10 10

45
40
35
30
25
20
15
10
5
0
1 2 3 4 5

3. Availability of Fund

Answers 1 2 3 4 5

Percentages 5 35 32 17 11

41
c  c

   

40
35
30
25
20
15
10
5
0
1 2 3 4 5

4. Availability of aedical Staff.

Answers 1 2 3 4 5

Percentages 8 55 21 11 5

60

50

40

30

20

10

0
1 2 3 4 5

5. Quality of aedical Staff

Answers 1 2 3 4 5

Percentages 9 12 27 43 9

42
c  c

   

50
45
40
35
30
25
20
15
10
5
0
1 2 3 4 5

6. According to your opinion whether program should be carried out in future?

Yes ºo Can¶t Say

77 16 7

90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
Y s  C  Sy

7. According to you up to what extent students are benefited by this program?
(Probe: How much convinced about efforts he / she is putting in?)

”50% 51% to 70% 71% to 80% >80%

53 37 7 3

43
c  c

   

60

50

40

30

20

10

0
ч50% 51%  70% 71%  80% >80%

8. Planning of Check-up schedule :

Answers 1 2 3 4 5

Percentages 9 29 39 13 10

45
40
35
30
25
20
15
10
5
0
1 2 3 4 5

9. Did your aedical Staff receive any training for school health programme in last five
years?

Yes ºo

43 57

44
c  c

   

60
50
40

30

20

10
0
Y s 

[indings
Education and health are inseparable. Student's health affects not only their cognitive
performance in school, but also their ability to attend and stay in school over the years.
Developing the human capital of nations especially the intellectual, social, mental, and
physical abilities of children and adolescents is fundamental to the improvement of the
quality of life of the citizens. Developing human capital is also critical for nations to enjoy
political stability and economic growth. ºations that have invested in health and education
have tended to experience corresponding economic development. For the development of
children government has undertaken various programmes and this is one of them and also one
of the most important. Under this programme if children have any dieses, then it is identified
and proper treatment is provided.

Some of the advantages of this programme are:

1. Around 88 to 90 lacks students are checked in this programme from last 10 years.
2. Even dieses like Cancer, Heart problems, Kidney problems are identified and cured
from last many years.
3. -f the dieses are not curable in the Gujarat State then they are sent outside so that they
get proper treatment and it is provided from Ca¶s Relief Fund etc.

However the schemes also have loopholes which are as below:

1. Some of the school health coordinators reported difficulties like improper referral
services, inadequate staff, inadequate drug supply and less time given by medical
officers for health examination per student etc.
2. Drugs and aedical Equipment are not available in proper quantity at various schools.

45
c  c

   

3. aedical staff is not available as per requirement, the available staff lacks the skills
and they are also not provided proper training.
4. aismanagement of fund.

A E D-

46
c  c

   

Q
s 
S  H   g  G
 G   
 
-  g by y
w b   s  y     w b
s    
s
y p
ps  y.

º   
  
 º 

1.  Aw ss b
  g
 1 2 3 4 5 G

2.  A b y  M   Eq


p s  D
gs
 1 2 3 4 5 G

3.  A b y  F



 1 2 3 4 5 G

4.  A b y  M   S.


 1 2 3 4 5 G

5.  Q
 y  M   S

47
c  c

   

 1 2 3 4 5 G

6.  A   g  y
 p  w   pg s
b  
  

 ?
Y s  C  Sy

7.  A   g  y

p  w   s
s  b  by s pg?
(b : Hw 
   b
 s  / s s p
 g  ?)

š 50 % 51%  70% 71%  80% > 80%

8.     g  C -
p s 
:
 1 2 3 4 5 G

9.  D y
 M   S    y   g  s     pg  s 
y s?

Y s / .

Scholarship Programme of Gujarat


Government

48
c  c

   

Introduction
Higher education is expense:

Higher education has become very expensive these days. Right from the pre-primary
to post-graduation, education is becoming highly professional and sophisticated. Œhe era of
government funded high schools and colleges is over and such institutions are now slowly
disappearing. As a result, the parents in the middle class and the upper middle class families
find it very difficult to provide a professional education such as medicine or engineering to
their children. Even if the student is very intelligent and achieving high ranks, however, as
the cost of education in the form of tuition fee, books, stationary, living expenses in hostels
and miscellaneous expenses have sky-rocketed, it has become a distant dream for a person
with an average income, to provide a higher education for his or her children. As a result, in
absence of proper financial planning and securing scholarships, a bright student may have to
compromise in education. Œhis is not a matter of getting tensed or frustrated but it is a matter
of being alert and well prepared so that the student can pursue an education of choice and
liking.

A brief understanding regarding educational expenses

Œhe self governed schools offering education up to Std. 10th and not depending on the
government grants are already very expensive. Œhe same situation persists in Std. 11th and
Std. 12th. Amongst this, the education is science stream is even more expensive. Œhere are a
lot of expenses involved in coaching classes for Std. 12th science as well as the entrance
examinations for the various professional degree courses available after Std. 12th science.

49
c  c

   

After securing admission in medical, dental, engineering, pharmacy, para-medical courses


etc, additional expense of hostel facility, food, stationary, transportation, communication etc
also incur and at the same time the tuition fee keeps on increasing. -f a student is able to
secure admission in a local college, some money can be saved on hostel or food bills but the
other expenses cannot be avoided. Œhe education expense varies from course to course and
from college to college. For example, the average fees charged by the medical and
engineering colleges in Gujarat are as follows: 1. aedical ± Rs 2.15 lakhs, 2. Ayurvedic
College ± Rs 1.04 lakhs, 3. Homeopathy College ± Rs 32,000/-, 4. Physiotherapy College ±
Rs 50,000/-, 5. ºursing- Rs 45000/-, 6. Optometry (Eye) College ± 40000/-, 7. Engineering ±
Rs 37000/-. Œhe additional expenses differ as per the factors discussed above. Œhe living
expense, food expense and miscellaneous expenses differ as per the status of the college and
it may vary from Rs 5000/- to Rs 15000/-. ºowadays colleges are providing packages for the
education. Œhen there are also hidden expenses in form of donation and payments. Hence it
isn¶t possible to decide the exact budget for any education. Œherefore it is very important for
every parent to make his or her own budget for the educational expenses of his or her child.
So far we have only discussed the expenses involved for graduation. We haven¶t discussed
the expenses that may involve in post graduation courses. Œhe expenses that are going to
incur for post graduation require even a higher calculation. Œhe same expensive situation
prevails in the a.C.A degree course also.
Education cudget Planning

-f an advance preparation for meeting the educational expenses after Std. 12th science
is not done then it is very important to prepare for the various scholarships, bank loans,
community loans etc. Hence, the parents and guardians of the students are advised to make an
advance preparation in form of availing bank loans or any other financial assistance for the
educational expenses that are going to incur.

Without any prejudice towards any private trusts or organizations, we would like to
inform the parents and students, there are certain trusts and institutions that demand fees for
providing the information booklets and application form for filing for the scholarships. -t
should be borne in mind that the institutes that offer scholarship assistance will never ask for
money in form of application form and information booklets. Hence one should cultivate this
understanding and proceed with caution while proceeding to avail any help from any
institution to avoid any inconveniences at a later stage.

50
c  c

   

1. cheme Details

2.1 D-RECŒ-Oº AºD ADa-º-SŒRAŒ-Oº 1(1) EºD: 23 SŒREºGŒHEº-ºG OF


COaa-SS-OºERAŒE AºD D-SŒR-CŒ OFF-CE.

Œhe Commissionerate of schools over sees the administration of over 6000


educational and other institutions of Secondary and Higher Secondary Education. While
certain institution are directly managed and controlled by the Commissionerate, others are
being funded through it, all recruitment of the Staff, their salaries, allowances and retirement
benefits are however being controlled through the Commissionerate directly. -t is therefore
necessary to strengthen the Commissionerate by providing Fax aachine, Copy Printer,
Franking aachine, Water Cooler, etc. (Rs. -n Lakh and Expenditure is up to Dec. 2001)

Sr. Year Provision Expenditure Œarget


ºo.
1 2006-07 175.00 132.39 Supply of Computer Duplicator, A.C. copy
printer to District Offices
2 2007-08 440.00 289.45 Computerization of Commisionerate and
District Offices

2.2 SECOºDARY EDUCAŒ-Oº 2(1) EDº:26(40) REGULAŒED GROWŒH OF


SECOºDARY SCHOOL

51
c  c

   

Regulated growth in the filed of Education is most desired factor for an ideal State.
Œhe state should endeavor to see that rural, backward and tribal areas of the state also develop
equally like other prosperous areas.

Œhere are 6011 Secondary and Higher Secondary schools in the state run by
Government and non-Governmental institutes. Œhe non-Government schools are provided
with the salary of the staff and maintenance grant under this scheme.

Sr ºo. Year Provision Expenditure Œarget


1 2006-07 764.10 248.25 ºew School
550 ºew Classes
660 Œeachers
540 scholars of Sainik School, Balachadi
2 2007-08 1142.90 790.95 400 ºew Classes
315 hr. Sec. Classes
15 Science Streeem School
Up gradation of aahila Sainik School,
Kherva
Scholarship to aahila Sainik School, Khiera

^. cholarship for Children from


dural Areas

ºAŒ-OºAL SCHOLARSH-PS FOR ŒALEºŒED CH-LDREº FROa RURAL


AREAS FOR SECOºDARY SŒAGE SŒUDY Level of Study Secondary Stage.
(-ncluding + 2stage)
ºumber of Scholarships- 43000 per year Eligibility

Œhis scheme has been in operation since 1971-72. Œhe objective of the scheme is to
provide opportunities to school students from rural areas to pursue secondary stage education.
Œhe number of scholarships allocated is communicated to the State Govts/UŒ Administration
every year.

A student studying in a school in a community development block in class V- to V---


is eligible to compete for the scholarship.

Î. election

52
c  c

   

Eligible students are required to appear in a two stage examination: First Stage:
Examination is conducted by the State Govts/UŒ Administration. Œhe number of selected
students is generally ten times the number of scholarship to be offered.

Second-stage-Œhe final examination is conducted at the ºational level by ºCERŒ.


Œhe local unit set up in the State -nstitutes of Education in consultation with the national level
unit in the ºCERŒ, prepare the test papers and organise the examination throughout the
States/UŒs. Œhe test consists of two papers of 1 1/2 hours each for testing the innate abilities
of students. -t is common to the entire State/UŒ. Œhe final selection is made with the
Community Development Block as the Unit and top students in each block are awarded
scholarships.

Rate of Scholarships Rs. 30 to 100 per month. Œhe scholarship is paid to the scholar
through institution. Scholarship commences from the month in which the admission is
obtained in a School and is paid up to the month in which last examination of the secondary
stage education is held. -n the case of renewal in the succeeding year, scholarship is paid
from the month following that for which the scholarship was paid during the previous
academic year. Œhe scholarship is renewed subject to good academic progress. Suspension of
Scholarship -f the scholar does not make satisfactory progress, the scholarship is suspended.
Contact Address District -nspector of School/Director of Education State/UΠGovernment.

. cholarships for Post-Metric tudents in Hindi


SCHOLARSH-PS FOR POSŒ-aEŒR-C SŒUDEºŒS -º H-ºD- ŒO SŒUDEºŒS FROa
ºOº-H-ºD- SPEAK-ºG SŒAŒES
Level of Study PUC/-ntermediate /Undergraduate, aA, Pre-PhD/a.Litt./Ph.D.(with Hindi)
Scholarships-2500
ºotification-June/July

Object
Œhe main object of the scheme is to encourage study of Hindi in non-Hindi speaking States
and to make available to the Governments of these States, suitable personnel for teaching and
other posts where knowledge of Hindi is essential.

53
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cope

Œhe scheme of Scholarship to Students from non-Hindi Speaking States for post matric
Studies in Hindi was introduced in 1984-85 on all -ndia basis. Œhe State Governments
announce the scheme and invite applications by issuing a press notification.

Œhe scholarships under the scheme are awarded for the following recognised full time
courses with Hindi as one of the subjects on the basis of results of examination next below
conducted by the Board of Education or University or recognised Voluntary Hindi
Organisation.

(a) Pre-University/-ntermediate and equivalent Examinations: On the basis of aatriculation;


SSLC or an equivalent Examinations.

(b) First Degree (Pass and Honours) Courses: On the basis of PUC Examination, Higher
Secondary Examination, -ndian School Certificate Examination and -ntermediate or an
equivalent Examination.

(c) a.A. (Hindi): On the basis of B.A. B.Sc/B.Com (pass or Honours) or an equivalent
Examinations.

(d) Pre-Ph.D/a.Litt. (Hindi): On the basis of a.A. (Hindi) Examination or an equivalent


Examination.

(e) Ph.D. (Hindi): On the basis of the qualification leading to the admission to the Ph.D.
Degree.

(f) Full time courses in Hindi for which examinations are conducted by Hindi Voluntary
Organisations engaged in the propagation of Hindi or by Universities provided these
examinations are recognised as equivalent to -ntermediate or above.

54
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Eligibility

Œhe candidates whose mother tongue is not Hindi and who belong to any of the following
States/Union Œerritories are eligible for scholarship: Andhra Pradesh, Assam, Gujarat,
Jammu & Kashmir, Karnataka, Kerala, aaharashtra, aanipur, aeghalaya, ºagaland, Orissa,
Punjab, Sikkim, Œamilnadu, Œripura, West Bengal, Andaman and ºicobar -slands, Arunachal
Pradesh, Chandigarh, Dadar ºagar Haveli, Goa, Daman & Diu, Lakshdweep, aizoram and
Pondicherry.

Œhe award is given on the basis of results of examinations next below conducted by the
Board of Education/University/Voluntary Hindi Organisation and passed in the first attempt.

Following categories of candidates are not eligible for the award:

(a) Candidates who belong to non-Hindi Speaking State but have been residing for any
purpose for more than 5 years.

(b) Candidates in employment (full or part time) unless they are sponsored by the State
Government/UΠAdministration;

(c) Candidates who wish to pursue their studies through correspondence/privately;

(d) Candidates who are preparing for two courses simultaneously unless Hindi is one of the
subjects of study in both these courses. A candidate in receipt of this scholarship (which is
treated as an incentive to learn Hindi) is not barred from receiving any other scholarship.
Scholars studying for Ph.D. course can be permitted to accept remuneration for teaching; if it
is a part of study/research.

5. cholarship for Post Metric tudies

Level of Post-aatric Study

ºumer of Scholarships-38,000 per year

Œhe Scheme for award of ºational Scholarships on merit was introduced in 1961-62
for Post-matric Studies so that no brilliant student is prevented on ground of poverty from
pursuing an academic career. Œhe scholarships are allotted among the various States and
Union Œerritory on the basis of population. Œhe Registrars of Universities/Secretaries of
Education Boards furnish data in regard to the number of students appeared and passed in
various examinations in prescribed proforma by the end of September each year. Courses and
amount of scholarships
.

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Sr. ºame of Course Day Hostellers


ºo. Scholars Rs. Rs. p.m.
p.m.

1 Pre-University course & -A/-/Sc/-st Year of 3 years B.A. 60 100


/B.Sc/B.Com. etc. course

2 B.A./B.Sc./B.Com/B.Archeology etc.(2nd and 3rd year) 90 140


courses.

3 B.E./B.Œech/aBBs/L.L.B/B.Ed/Diploma professional and 120 300


Engineering studies

4 Degree in Homeopathic course 120 300

5 B.D.S.Course 120 300

6 a.A./a.Sc/LL.a/a..Ed/aBA 120 300

7 Post-Graduate Diploma in Œourism 120 300

8 Diploma in Hotel aanagement course/Diploma in 120 120


Homeopathy
9 aaster of Labour Welfare 120 300

10 aaster of Social Welfare 120 300

11 Post-Graduate Diploma in Banking 120 300

12 aaster of Computer Application course 120 300

13 Post-Graduate Diploma in journalism 120 300

14 Post- Graduate Diploma in Computer Application 120 300

15 Post-Graduate Diploma in Computer aanagement. 120 300

16 Post- Graduate Programme in aanagement 120 300

17 aaster in personal aanagement and -ndustrial relations 120 120

18 Post-Graduate course in Automobile Engineering 120 300

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Analysis and [indings


1) How did you get information about scholarship scheme?

Friend Relatives Faculty Advertisement Others

24 7 37 19 13

13
24 F !"
R  s
19
F
y
7 #
d s $ !
 s
37

2) -s the amount paid, sufficient?

Yes ºo

19 81

19

Y s
%

81

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3) Do you get the amount on time?

Yes ºO

24 76

24

Y s
NO

76

4) -s the procedure for getting the scholarship easy?

Yes ºo

28 72

28

Y s
N

72

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5) Do you think there is bias in distributing scholarship?

Yes ºo

56 44

44
Y s

56
&

6) What do you think about this scheme?

Good Bad Can¶t Say

48 33 19

19

G
48

C  Sy
33

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7) How many times do you get benefit of this scheme?

1 2 3 4 aore than 4

9 17 43 26 5

5 9
1
26 17
2
3
4
M  4
43

8) Write suggestion to improve this scheme.

We got many answers, but most of the answers are as below

J Procedure for getting scholarship should be easier.

J Œhere should be a co-ordinator, who provides guidance regarding scholarship.

J Œhere should be some programmes to be developed to increase awareness regarding


programme.

J Amount paid is fair enough to cover their educational expenses.

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[indings
Higher education has become very expensive these days. Right from the pre-primary to post-
graduation, education is becoming highly professional and sophisticated. Œhe era of
government funded high schools and colleges are over and such institutions are now slowly
disappearing. As a result, the parents in the middle class and the upper middle class families
find it very difficult to provide a professional education such as medicine or engineering to
their children.

We have conducted the survey of 100 respondents. From the response of the respondent we
can generalize that most of the beneficiaries of the scheme are not satisfied or not in favour of
the present condition of the scheme. Œhey required modification in the current scheme as it
has some drawbacks like the amount paid is not sufficient, the process is very much lengthy
and tedious so many students who are eligible are not going for it, delays in the payment of
amount etc. Scholarship programme does help them to reduce the burden of their family
regarding his/her study. Œhere are expenses other than the tuition fee like Residential
expenses (for those who are not the native), Lodging expenses, the scheme does not provide
for all these expenses, which have significant part in the total expenses. We also find that
there is ratio of bias in the distribution of scholarships, so there should transparency in the
process.

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62
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64
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b gpy:
s:
1. Business Research aethods by William Zikmund.
2. Business Research aethods by Donald Cooper and Pamela Schindler

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