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Inmates help make pound dogs more adoptable, p3 T HE D ELPHOS Blue Jay offense overpowers

Inmates help make pound dogs more adoptable, p3

THE

DELPHOS

Blue Jay offense overpowers Spencerville, p6

HERALD

Inmates help make pound dogs more adoptable, p3 T HE D ELPHOS Blue Jay offense overpowers

Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869

50¢ daily www.delphosherald.com WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2011 Delphos, Ohio
50¢ daily
www.delphosherald.com
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 2011
Delphos, Ohio
Upfront
Upfront

Postal museum sets gala event

The Delphos Museum of Postal History is organizing a “Night at the Museum” gala event for Feb. 19. Cocktails, hors d’oevres and a buffet dinner will be included the evening of unveiling several new exhib- its, marking a few dedica- tions, recognitions and a very unique art display. As part of the unique display, the museum is call- ing for mail art. Artists from the US and around the world are invited to submit origi- nal art based on the theme:

‘Going Postal - What’s It To You?’ All media and techniques will be accepted as long as it is sent via postal services with the post- age paid by participant. Sizes from post card (4 x 6 [10 cm x 15 cm]) up to 8 1/2 x 11 will be accepted. No jury, no fees, no returns. Provide name, address, email and title of mail art.

Send to:

Judy Grone 6005 Defiance Trail Delphos, OH 45833 All submissions will be on exhibit exclud- ing offensive, racist, or discriminatory images. Deadline to receive Mail Art is Feb. 11. For more informa- tion, email judygrone@ hotmail.com. Send j-pegs to Gary Levitt at

USA

Benefit set Sunday

A benefit for Mary Schramm to help defray med- ical expenses from battling

cancer will be held from noon to 6 p.m. Sunday at VFW Post 3035, 213 W. Fourth St.,

Delphos.

The meal includes:

sausage, mashed potatoes, kraut, beef and noodles, roll and dessert for $6. A DJ, raffles and a 50/50 are also planned.

Cheetah the chimp from 1930s

Tarzan flicks dies

PALM HARBOR, Fla. (AP) — A Florida animal sanctuary says Cheetah the chimpanzee sidekick in the Tarzan movies of the early 1930s has died at age 80. The Suncoast Primate Sanctuary in Palm Harbor announced that Cheetah died Dec. 24 of kidney failure. Sanctuary outreach director Debbie Cobb on Wednesday told The Tampa Tribune that Cheetah was outgoing, loved finger paint- ing and liked to see people laugh. She says he seemed to be tuned into human feelings. Cheetah was the comic relief in the Tarzan films that starred American Olympic gold medal swimmer Johnny Weissmuller. Cobb says Cheetah came to the sanctu- ary from Weissmuller’s estate sometime around 1960.

Forecast
Forecast

Mostly cloudy Thursday with 30 per- cent chance of light rain, snow. High in upper 30s. See page 2.

Inmates help make pound dogs more adoptable, p3 T HE D ELPHOS Blue Jay offense overpowers

Index

Obituaries

2

State/Local

3

Politics

4

Community

5

Sports

6-7

Business

8

Classifieds

9

TV

10

World news

11

Inmates help make pound dogs more adoptable, p3 T HE D ELPHOS Blue Jay offense overpowers

Local top cop reviews 2011

BY MIKE FORD mford@delphosherald.com

DELPHOS — As 2011 comes to an end, city depart- ments are submitting reports to the mayor. The reports summarize the department’s activities over the previous 12 months and for law enforce- ment, the year was chaotic. Chief Kyle Fittro said the sky seemed to fall this sum- mer because of personnel issues compiled with average summer arrest numbers but his officers handled it well. “This was one of the bus- ier years I’ve seen in a long time, especially from June to the end of September. Most of our arrests were made in that time period but we were short-staffed and the guys were working 12 and 14-hour shifts. They were working on their days off, so sometimes, they were working seven days a week and on top of that, they were very, very busy. It was a very hectic year,” he said. Fittro said there was turn- over and medical issues in 2011. The department has four dispatchers that cover all 168 hours in each week, with some help from officers. When one of the dispatch- ers resigned, the other three dispatchers began working 12-hour shifts without getting to take vacations as the search began for a replacement. The chief said the civil service position takes nearly 6 months to fill from day one to the time the new dis- patcher can function on his or her own. A test must be prepared, administered and scored. Then two rounds of interviews are conducted and decisions are made, as well as background checks and physicals performed. Once someone is hired, it takes about two months to train the new dispatcher to the point of working without another dispatcher’s assistance. Fittro said this was going on at the same time as three auxiliary officers took full- time jobs elsewhere, a fourth auxiliary officer retired and while the chief and two other officers were out for sever- al weeks each with medical issues. At times, the depart- ment was down 6-8 people and everyone else had to work extended shifts to cover for those who were out. “When you also consider that we’re operating with less money and trying to figure out how to pay all this over- time to cover for those who weren’t here, it made 2011 a very difficult year in terms of scheduling and keeping cops here, just because of the cir- cumstances,” Fittro said. The year included nota- ble cases, such as an inci- dent where a man assaulted a senior citizen in the search for drug money. Fittro said the number of arrests was not unusually high but, in any year, if drugs and alcohol were not in the picture, the

“This was one of the busier years I’ve seen in a long time, especially from June to the end of September. Most of our arrests were made in that time period but we were short-staffed and the guys were working 12 and 14-hour shifts.”

— Delphos Police Chief Kyle Fittro

statistic would be drastically lower. “In terms of the number of arrests, the year was similar to previous ones. Drugs are always a factor but some- times you can’t prove a link. Often, there is anecdotal evi- dence when you investigate a theft, for example. A lot of crimes are based in drug use but you may not be able to prove it unless they confess to the crime and admit their motivation was drug-related. Otherwise, a lot of times, it’s impossible to link the theft with drugs,” he said. In 2011, the department used donated funds to pur- chase an unmarked car for detectives. Also free of charge, Delphos PD received an Intoxilyzer 800 alcohol testing machine from the state. The chief noted some maintenance issues, saying he revised and rewrote the policy and procedures manual, which had not be revisited in 11 years. He also revised the records retention schedule and this hadn’t been done in 18 years. The department cleaned its offices and removed six truckloads of trash. Looking ahead at 2012, the department plans to add AR-15 patrol rifles in all cruisers with donated funds. Also free of charge, the department gets DNA testing kits from the state. This is because the legislature passed a law requiring all persons arrested for felony offenses to have their DNA collected by the police department making the arrest. “We swab their mouths and send it in; the state keeps it on file for comparative purposes if the person commits another crime. From a police stand- point, this is fantastic because if we go to the scene of a burglary, for example, and the unknown perpetrator has cut himself and there are two drops of blood, we can collect it, feed it into the database and, if he has been arrested for a felony in the past, we got him,” Fittro said.

The department’s 2011 statistics are as follows:

• Officers took 1,082 separate written reports;

• Officers handled 174 separate car accidents within the

city limits;

• Officers made 773 separate arrests;

• Officers responded to 7,658 separate calls for service;

• Detectives worked 40 separate “long term” investiga-

tions. This yielded 67 felony charges against 38 different people. Many of them “career criminal” types that plague

the city;

• The department as a whole made 840 arrests;

• Various officers attended 25 separate training semi- nars. Nearly all free;

• Fittro gave 8 drug related seminars to different groups

in Delphos;

• Police conducted 4 positive reinforcement seat belt

campaigns within the city; • Gave 4 guided tours of the building. Totaling approxi- mately 200 people;

• Conducted 1 OVI checkpoint; • Received $14,270 in donation money; and • Continued its partnership with the West Central Ohio

Crime Task Force and still have Investigator Ben Becker assigned there full time.

Inmates help make pound dogs more adoptable, p3 T HE D ELPHOS Blue Jay offense overpowers
Inmates help make pound dogs more adoptable, p3 T HE D ELPHOS Blue Jay offense overpowers

WRAPUP

Inmates help make pound dogs more adoptable, p3 T HE D ELPHOS Blue Jay offense overpowers
Inmates help make pound dogs more adoptable, p3 T HE D ELPHOS Blue Jay offense overpowers

File photos

New Year’s Baby Keenan Vincent Martz was welcomed home by siblings Alexis, above center, Cohen, right, and Grady Martz. He was born Jan. 6 at St. Rita’s Medical Center to Michael and Tricia Martz of Delphos.

Each year at this time, The Herald staff takes a look back at the happenings in the area in the past year. Here is the first of four year-end wrapups.

Jan. 7

January

Delphos Police Chief Kyle Fittro was named the Optimist

Club’s “Law Enforcement Officer of the Year.” Fittro was presented a plaque by Optimist Club President Michael Friedrich. Mayor Michael Gallmeier applauded Fittro for his dedication to “serve and protect.”

Jan. 8

The construction on the Delphos Senior Villas was on schedule, with an esti- mated completion date set in July. “All the buildings

are framed and we’re work- ing on the interior,” L&W Associates Site Manager Jim Ballard said. The project was funded with $5 million from the Ohio Housing Agency, $4.5 million in credits from the federal stimulus program and $600,000 from a state housing fund.

Jan. 10

The Delphos New Year’s Baby was announced as Keenan Vincent Martz. He was born at 8:09 p.m. on Jan. 6, 2011, at St. Rita’s Medical Center to Michael and Tricia Martz. He weighed 6 pounds, 11 ounces and was 20 inches long. He was welcomed home by siblings Alexis, Cohen and Grady Martz. Grandparents are Mike and Marty Clark and Joe and Diane Martz. Great-grandparents are Helen Clark and the late Edward Clark, the late Vincent and Helen Metzner, Eileen Martz and the late Melvin Martz and the late Harold and Lucille

Harpster, all from Delphos. Keenan’s great uncle Nick Clark was the Delphos New Year’s Baby 48 years earlier. Republican John Kasich succeeded one-term Democrat Ted Strickland as Ohio’s governor, promising a businessman’s approach to policy that he hoped would restore economic security and add jobs. The 58-year- old Kasich took his oath of office at 12:01 a.m. in front

of more than 150 specta - tors.

Jan. 13

Jan. 27

After a year-long search for a permanent pastor, St. Peter Lutheran Church gave the position to Rev. Angela Khabeb, from Omaha, Nebraska. “I am excited about being here at St. Peter,” Khabeb said. “There is a won- derful energy, the congrega- tion is fantastic. They want to do things, they’re involved. Here you don’t have to pull teeth to get them to partici- pate and that’s gold- it’s just gold.”

Sarah Jane Living Center was named one of the top Jan. 27 The Delphos Eagles
Sarah Jane Living Center
was named one of the top
Jan. 27
The
Delphos
Eagles

Delphos Police Chief Kyle Fittro was named the Optimist Club’s “Law Enforcement Officer of the Year.” Fittro was presented a plaque by Optimist Club President Michael Friedrich.

25 in customer satisfac - tion, according to the 2010 Nursing Home Family Satisfaction Survey by the Ohio Department of Aging. Sarah Jane Living Center’s satisfaction score was 96.9,

with the state average being

87.93.

donated proceeds to area schools and organizations. President Randall Murray and other officers were on hand to give checks to both Delphos schools, Spencerville, Fort Jennings, Ottoville, Lincolnview, Van

See WRAPUP, page 2

Inmates help make pound dogs more adoptable, p3 T HE D ELPHOS Blue Jay offense overpowers

Reagan Ulm and her mom, Lisa, race down the side of the Delphos-Gillmor Reservoir the afternoon of Jan. 11.

2 – The Herald

Wednesday, December 28, 2011

www.delphosherald.com

2 – The Herald Wednesday, December 28, 2011 www.delphosherald.com For The Record Wrapup The Jefferson Lady

For The Record

Wrapup

2 – The Herald Wednesday, December 28, 2011 www.delphosherald.com For The Record Wrapup The Jefferson Lady

The Jefferson Lady Wildcats ended their state run, succumbing to the Lady Warriors of Canal Winchester Harvest Prep with a score of 55-52.

(Continued from page 1)

Elida schools’ athletic departments, the Delphos Tri-County Wrestling Club

and Cattlemen’s Association, among others.

Jan. 29

Jack and Peggy Adams announced their hopes to turn

the Peltier home into a bed and breakfast. The couple had been working on reno- vating the home for more than a year.

February

Feb. 2

Delphos City crews worked from 2 a.m. on, plowing streets and removing giant piles of snow following a heavy winter storm. Van Wert County issued a Snow Emergency, with all roads closed and only emergen - cy vehicles allowed on the roadways. Allen and Putnam Counties were under a Level 2 Advisory. The Treasure Hunters Roadshow set up shop at the Microtel Inn and Suites. Delphos residents brought jewelry, gold, silver, various collectibles, antiques, rare books and historical items, not to be appraised, but to sell to the Roadshow team, led by Fred Dillon Jr.

Punxatawny Phil and

Buckeye Chuck predicted an early spring.

Feb. 3

Delphos mourned the passing of coaching icon Bob

Arnzen, who passed away at the age of 83. When he retired at the end of the 1992- 93 season, with 696 victo- ries throughout his career at the helm of the St. John’s boys basketball program, the gymnasium at St. John’s was renamed the Robert A. Arnzen Gymnasium.

Feb. 21

Boy Scout Justin Fischer, 18, obtained Eagle Scout rank after completing his project, two stone monu- ments at Ottoville Park com- memorating the history of the

Miami Erie Canal. Fischer was a senior at Ottoville High School and finished the proj- ect in October of 2010.

Feb. 22

It was announced that St. John’s High School Senior Tyler Koester would be head- ed to Washington D.C., in the spring after being declared a state winner of the American Legion and American Legion Auxiliary Americanism & Government Program. Koester, son of Mark and Sherri Koester, scored 98 out of a possible 100

points on the test.

Feb. 28

Nearly three inches of rain

overnight and melting snow caused Flat Fork Creek to leave its banks at Waterworks Park in the early morning, flooding Suthoff, Hunt and other surrounding streets. Throughout the state, thou-

sands were without power and roads and homes were flooded. Threats included tor- nadoes in some areas.

Mar. 8

March

Stephanie Braun, Jefferson High School math teacher and member of the Delphos Education Association received the NWOEA District Service Award. “Winners are selected with a particular emphasis on high quality and

the award is considered a hallmark of respect,” NOEA President Jerry Schlick said.

Mar. 11

Fort Jennings Schools, grades K-6, participated in “The Worlds Largest Concert,” part of Music In Our Schools Month. The con- cert used video to connect students around the country

as they sang the same songs at the same time.

Mar. 12

Sheryl Fetzer was given

the Jefferson Award for Up To The Challenge, a program

that gives a positive lift to special people overcoming developmental challenges. Fetzer began the program with the help of local resident Amy Hale. The two women shared a bond as mothers of special needs children.

Mar. 17

The Jefferson Lady Wildcats ended their state run, succumbing to the Lady

Warriors of Canal Winchester Harvest Prep with a score of 55-52. “I am very proud of the girls and how they played this year. These young ladies played with heart and they played hard every night,” Coach David Hoffman said.

Mar. 22

Two Fort Jennings Boy Scouts earned the rank of Eagle Scout. Petey VanLoo, son of Pete and Nancy VanLoo, completed his proj- ect overseeing the building of picnic tables for the sports complex of Fort Jennings High School. Spencer Dray,

son of Tom and Mary Dray, coordinated a clothing and book drive to benefit Putnam County Thrift Store. Both received assistance from fel- low Scouts.

Mar. 23

Film legend Elizabeth Taylor died at the age of 79 of congestive heart failure at Cedars-Sinai Medical center, surrounded by her four chil- dren. She had been hospital- ized for roughly six weeks prior to her death, according to publicist Sally Morrison.

Mar. 25

Middle Point siblings Brent and Emily Niese announced their intentions to open “Brentily’s Steakhouse,” in the space formerly occu- pied by Johnny A’s Grill and Spirits sports bar. The pair were making headway

on renovations and hoped to open doors soon.

Mar. 31

The 2011 County Health Rankings released by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute announced Putnam County as no. 6, while Van Wert was 39 and Allen was 46. Each county was judged on four factors: health behaviors, clinical care, social and economic and physical environment factors.

2 – The Herald Wednesday, December 28, 2011 www.delphosherald.com For The Record Wrapup The Jefferson Lady
FUNERAL
FUNERAL

LUCKE, John E., 66, of Fort Jennings, Mass of Christian Burial will begin at 11 a.m. Thursday at St. Joseph Catholic Church, Fort Jennings, the Rev. Joseph Przybysz officiating. Military rites will follow after the Mass by the Fort Jennings American Legion. Visitation will be from 2-4 p.m. and 6-8 p.m. today at Love-Heitmeyer Funeral Home, Jackson Township, and one hour prior to the mass at the church on Thursday. A scripture service will be held at 4 p.m. and an American Legion service at 7 p.m. today at the funeral home. Memorials may be made to a charity of the donor’s choice. Condolences may be expressed at lovefu- neralhome.com.

WEATHER

Delphos weather

High temperature Tuesday in Delphos was 36 degrees,

low was 32. Mixed precip-

itation

was recorded

at

.49

inch. High a year ago today was 28, low was 15. Record high for today is 66, set in 2008. Record low is -17, set in 1924.

WEATHER FORECAST Tri-county Associated Press

The Delphos

Herald

Vol. 142 No. 151

Nancy Spencer, editor Ray Geary, general manager Delphos Herald Inc. Don Hemple, advertising manager Tiffany Brantley, circulation manager

The Daily Herald (USPS 1525 8000) is published daily except Sundays, Tuesdays and Holidays. By carrier in Delphos and area towns, or by rural motor route where available $1.48 per week. By mail in Allen, Van Wert, or Putnam County, $97 per year. Outside these counties $110 per year. Entered in the post office in Delphos, Ohio 45833 as Periodicals, postage paid at Delphos, Ohio.

No mail subscriptions will be

accepted in towns or villages where The Daily Herald paper

carriers or motor routes provide

daily home delivery for $1.48 per week. 405 North Main St. TELEPHONE 695-0015 Office Hours 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri. POSTMASTER:

Send address changes to THE DAILY HERALD, 405 N. Main St. Delphos, Ohio 45833

BIRTH
BIRTH

ST. RITA’S

TONIGHT: Partly cloudy through midnight then becom- ing mostly cloudy. Lows in the lower 20s. Southwest winds 5 to 15 mph. THURSDAY : Mostly cloudy with a 30 percent chance of light rain and light

snow. Highs in the upper 30s. Southwest winds 15 to 20 mph. THURSDAY NIGHT :

Mostly cloudy with a 30 per- cent chance of rain and snow. Lows in the mid 30s. FRIDAY: Mostly cloudy with a 40 percent chance of rain and snow. Highs in the lower 40s. FRIDAY NIGHT: Mostly cloudy with a 20 percent chance of snow. Lows in the lower 30s.

SATURDAY, NEW

YEAR’S EVE: Partly cloudy. Highs in the lower 40s. Lows in the mid 30s. NEW YEAR’S DAY :

Mostly cloudy with a 40 per- cent chance of rain. Highs in the mid 40s.

A

girl was born

Dec. 27

to Sara Jewell and Adam

Pohlman of Delphos.

LOCAL PRICES

Corn:

$6.23

Wheat:

$6.22

Beans:

$11.76

POLICE REPORT
POLICE
REPORT

Delphos man shoots self in hand

At 4:54 a.m. on Wednesday, Delphos Police received a phone call from Saint Rita’s Medical Center advising a 43-year-old male from Delphos had come into the ER with a single gunshot wound to the hand. A brief investiga- tion revealed the male was at his residence in the 800 block

of Skinner Street in Delphos

LOTTERY
LOTTERY

CLEVELAND (AP) —

These Ohio lotteries were drawn Tuesday:

Mega Millions

23-32-33-39-43, Mega Ball: 8

Estimated jackpot: $206 M

Megaplier

when the incident occurred. The male said he had

been removing a loaded .357 Magnum from under his pil- low with the intent of placing the gun on his night stand, when the gun accidentally dis- charged and struck him in the hand. Medical staff believed the male to be intoxicated

  • 3 upon his arrival at the ER. At this point, city police do not suspect foul play; how- ever the incident does remain under investigation.

Pick 3 Evening

9-9-0

Pick 4 Evening

5-1-5-5

Powerball

Estimated jackpot: $20 M

Rolling Cash 5

09-27-30-33-37

Estimated jackpot:

$110,000

Ten OH Evening

Parked vehicle hit

At 8:55 a.m. on Saturday, a collision occurred when the driver of one vehicle struck a parked car while attempting

  • 01-04-07-08-09-11-12-14- to turn.

Delphos mourned the passing of coaching icon Bob Arnzen, who passed away at the age of 83.

  • 15-17-23-24-34-38-57-59-60- The vehicle of Anthony Morabito was legally parked along North Scott Street, facing southbound, when Nichole Mason, 19, of Delphos, attempted to pull out of an east/west alley and make a right-hand turn. Mason struck Morabito’s vehicle with her own, caus - ing non-functional damage to both cars. There were no injuries. Mason was cited for failure to maintain reasonable con- trol.

67-70-73

Driver leaves scene of crash

At 9:31 a.m. on Friday, a collision occurred when an unknown vehicle struck a sec- ond vehicle parked in a pri- vate driveway. The vehicle of Thomas Wulfurst, of Delphos, was parked in his driveway at 802 N. Franklin Street when an unknown white vehicle struck Wulfurst’s drivers side door and fled the scene.

In

1943, Franklin D.

Roosevelt, Winston Churchill and Charles de Gaulle met in Casablanca, Morocco. Franklin D. Roosevelt’s meeting in Casablanca marked the first time a U.S. president left the country’s soil during wartime.

www.delphosherald.com

Wednesday, December 28, 2011

The Herald –3

www.delphosherald.com Wednesday, December 28, 2011 The Herald –3

STATE/LOCAL

Ohio prisoners help make pound dogs more adoptable

CenturyLink offers ‘Internet Basics’ for low-income consumers

TOLEDO (AP) — A program that lets Ohio prison inmates train pound dogs to help make the animals more adoptable has graduated its first class of four canine students. The Lucas County Dog Warden pro- gram called Ph.D., Prisoners Helping Dogs, places dogs with inmate trainers for six weeks, The Blade newspaper of Toledo reported. Pudgie, a shepherd, was among the dogs that did time at the Toledo Correctional Institution, receiving train- ing from a former death row inmate and a man convicted of burglary and other crimes. David Brody, who’s serving 17 years for the burglary and other convictions, is now training another dog but said he misses Pudgie. “He taught me patience,” said Brody, 41. “He was real stubborn and bull- headed, but he turned out great.”

John Spirko, 65, whose death sen- tence was commuted, is serving a life sentence for aggravated murder. He said Pudgie taught him companionship. The program started in February and initially used minimum-security inmates at the Toledo Correctional Institution

prison camp, which has since closed due to state budget cuts and a restructur- ing of the prison system. It now uses inmates like Spirko, who are deemed close-security, the third security level in the state’s five-level system.

“The inmates

are providing a valu-

... able service in hopes that the dogs will get a second chance of finding a loving home,” said Maj. Gary Parker, chief of security at the prison. “The inmates take a lot of pride in working with the dogs.” Many dogs chosen for the training may be the type that are passed over because they are big or black or over-

weight, said Dog Warden Julie Lyle. “Sometimes they are simply unman- nered,” she said. “The behavior differ- ence between when they go and when they come back is dramatic — and wonderful.” The program is among about 50 animal-training programs at Ohio pris- ons but is unique because it helps pound dogs, The Blade reported. Many others are used to train dogs that assist people with disabilities or help out dogs from private rescue groups or humane societ- ies. Lyle said the training helps the pound learn more about the dogs so they can be adopted by the most appropriate owners. Only prisoners who have model behavior are chosen for the program, and sex offenders are not allowed to participate, said Lt. Peter Kimball, who supervises the program at the prison.

BRIEFS
BRIEFS

Lack of snow is a money saver

AKRON (AP) — Little snow in Ohio has meant big savings for state and local agen- cies that are grateful for weather that’s helping their budgets. Summit County officials tell the Akron Beacon Journal they’ve spent about $90,000 less on road salt and at least $20,000 less on overtime relat- ed to snow removal than they had by this time last year. As of early this week, Akron’s snowfall for December was almost 7 inches below normal. Dealing with snow has cost the Ohio Department of Transportation about $2.8 mil- lion this year, compared to $18.5 million by this point in 2010. ODOT has spread just 13,000 tons of salt, down from close to 146,000 last year.

Judge holds hearing on alleged ‘pill mill’

PORTSMOUTH (AP) — A southern Ohio judge is ready to hear arguments for why a medical clinic described by authorities as little more than a drug house should be perma- nently closed. The operator of Greater Medical Advance in Wheelersburg and the clinic’s doctor face charges of corrupt activity and drug trafficking. Scioto County Common Pleas Court Judge William Marshall temporarily closed the clinic last week and sched- uled a hearing today to decide whether the order should be permanent. The facility was the last so-called ‘pill mill’ in Scioto County, a place where tens of thousands of painkillers were allegedly prescribed or dis- pensed to almost anyone who walked through its doors. The owner of the building where the clinic is located has denied any knowledge of the goings-on or illegal activity.

Panel meets to modernize Ohio Constitution

COLUMBUS (AP) — A bipartisan panel charged with reviewing Ohio’s Constitution for possible updates is prepar- ing for its first meeting. Creation of the Ohio Constitutional Modernization Commission was spearheaded by Republican House Speaker William Batchelder as a way of preparing for the possibility that a constitutional conven- tion will be called in 2012. The question is put before voters every 20 years. Ohio’s Constitution affects voting, marriage, taxes on casinos and other businesses, elective terms and how the state pays for schools.

Gas drilling boom good news for Ohio sand firms

AKRON (AP) — The boom in drilling for natural gas trapped in layers of shale has been good news for a handful of Ohio companies that supply the type of sand needed for such drilling. Rob Sidley’s family- owned company in Thompson in northeast Ohio processes sand that is perfect for the drilling process because it’s nearly 100 percent quartz as well as round, hard and water resistant. It flows like liquid and can survive heavy pres- sures underground. The Akron Beacon Journal reported Monday companies like Sidley’s have a valuable commodity since 6,000 to 8,000 tons of sand are needed to drill one well. A decade ago, such sand sold for about $35 a ton, compared to $60 to $80 a ton today. The process for releas- ing gas in the Marcellus and Utica shale formations blasts thousands of gallons of sand- and chemical-laced water into the shale, a process known as hydraulic fracturing or frack- ing. “It’s all about Mother Nature and location,” said Sidley. “We just have what we have. And we love what we have. It’s something spe- cial.” Ohio issued dozens of Utica and Marcellus drilling permits this year, compared to only a handful just a cou- ple of years ago. Sidley’s firm supplies his sand to well service com- panies that in turn provide it to companies such as Oklahoma-based Chesapeake Energy Corp., the biggest driller in Ohio. Sidley declined to reveal how much fracking sand his company is expecting to produce, but the company

TRASH TALK

Allen County Refuse pro- vides garbage and recycle col- lection in Delphos. The Allen County portion of Delphos is collected on Thurs- days, with residents placing garbage containers on the curb Wednesday evening and recycle every other Wednesday. The Van Wert County por- tion of Delphos is collected on Friday, with residents placing garbage containers at the curb on Thursday evening and recy- cle every other Thursday. If a holiday falls during the week, collection is pushed back a day. For example, the week of Memorial Day, collection in Al- len County will be Friday and in Van Wert County it will be Saturday. Big item collection is held from 8 a.m.-noon the first Sat- urday of each month in the parking lot across from the city building. Participants need to show proof of residency like a city utility bill. See the full schedule at cityofdelphos.com.

annually produces 400,000 to 500,000 tons of sand and gravel from its 1,800-acre operation with 150 employ- ees. The drilling industry says fracking has been used safely for years, while opponents worry about the possible effect on the environment. Sidley’s business is one of only a handful of sand-and- gravel operations in Ohio that produces suitable sand for fracturing, according to the Ohio Department of Natural Resources. Sands suitable for fracking are found only in three coun- ties, Geagua in northeast Ohio, Knox in eastern Ohio and Ross in southern Ohio, said Patrick Jacomet, executive director of the Gahanna-based Ohio Aggregates & Industrial Minerals Association. Most Ohio sands are too soft, the wrong shape or too prone to react with water and chemicals, he said. The market for fracking sands quadrupled from 2000 to 2009, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. It said drillers used 6.5 mil- lion metric tons of sands in 2009 and that total doubled

in 2010. A metric ton is 2,204 pounds. Forty percent of indus- trial sand production in the United States in 2010 went to hydraulic fracturing, according to geological sur- vey estimates. Most fracking sands come from Arkansas, Illinois, Minnesota, Texas and Wisconsin. Jacomet’s trade associa- tion is trying to educate its 200 members about drill- ers’ needs and is researching other pockets of sand in Ohio that would be acceptable. The association is also looking into a resin coating for Ohio sands to make them tougher, a process being done elsewhere. Sidley’s company is work- ing eight-hour shifts five days a week to excavate, move, screen, wash, dry and sort the sands at its Geauga County operation. Sidley said the company could easily qua- druple its production. And there’s plenty of sand to dig. “My grandchildren won’t have to worry about running out in their lifetimes,” said Sidley, 51, who has no grand- children yet. “We’ve got a lot

of sand right here.”

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LIMA — CenturyLink, Inc. (NYSE: CTL), one of the nation’s leading Internet service providers, is offering the “CenturyLink Internet Basics” package in the Ohio market to improve and pro- mote broadband adoption and use by low-income consum- ers. To help get more low- income households online, CenturyLink is offering dis- counted High-Speed Internet service starting at $9.95 per month, plus applicable taxes and fees, to eligible con- sumers in Ohio. The service provides access up to 1.5 Mbps downstream capability. Higher bandwidth services, where available, are offered at a comparable discount. CenturyLink is also offer- ing program participants an Internet-ready netbook com- puter for $150, plus taxes, shipping and handling. The new equipment includes access to CenturyLink@ Ease, a comprehensive suite of backup, security and sup- port services. “CenturyLink is pleased to offer affordable High-Speed Internet service and comput- ers to those who need help getting online,” said Kelly Blay, CenturyLink’s vice president and general man- ager for Ohio. In addition, CenturyLink is arranging basic computer

education and technology training at no cost to Internet Basics customers. The class- es are being offered through community groups and senior centers, as well as schools, libraries, and other state and local institutions, in more than 100 markets throughout the country. Participation in CenturyLink Internet Basics is determined by the criteria for the Lifeline Affordable Telephone Service, a federal program currently offered by CenturyLink that provides discounts on basic monthly telephone service to eligible low-income consumers. According to a study on broadband adoption by the Federal Communications Commission, 60 percent of low-income households, which are defined as having annual incomes of less than $20,000, do not subscribe to High-Speed Internet service, compared to 35 percent of the entire U.S. population. Among those Americans who do not have broadband at home, 36 percent said it was because of the cost of the ser- vice and equipment, and 22 percent cited a “lack of digital literacy.” For more information about CenturyLink Internet Basics, please visit http:// www.centurylink.com/inter - netbasics.

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4 — The Herald
4 — The Herald

Wednesday, December 28, 2011

www.delphosherald.com

4 — The Herald Wednesday, December 28, 2011 www.delphosherald.com

POLITICS

“There is no luck except where there is discipline.”

— Irish proverb

4 — The Herald Wednesday, December 28, 2011 www.delphosherald.com P OLITICS “There is no luck except

IT WAS NEWS THEN

One Year Ago

• The Marsh Foundation School recently held its annual

Christmas program and luncheon. Each student performed during the piano recital and in the school’s production of

“Scrooge.” This year, instrumental music has been added to the school’s curriculum and several students performed in an instrumental ensemble.

  • 25 Years Ago — 1986

• Although billed as the game the “big boys would win,” the contest at Elida Fieldhouse was won at the foul line by

the Elida Bulldogs as they slipped 15 of their last quarter’s 25

points through the hoop from the charity strip on the way to a 69-61 win over St. John’s. The leading scorer for the game

and the Jays was Mike Williams who singed the nets for 27 points. Junior Brian Heitz added 16.

• Forty-eight members of Landeck Catholic Ladies of

Columbia met for a Christmas party. Santa distributed gifts and Polly Geise won the door prize. The next meeting will be

Jan. 13. Chairladies are Martha Etzkorn and Bernie Pohlman,

assisted by Betty Jean Sever, Jane Bonifas, JoAnn Merricle

and Ruth Baldauf.

• Jim Armstrong hit for 26 points to lead the Bluffton

Pirates to their first win of the season 65-48 over Jefferson in

the WDOH Holiday Tournament at Jefferson Middle School. Jason Huysman and Damon Ulm led Jefferson with eight

points each. Armstrong was the only Bluffton player in double

figures.

  • 50 Years Ago — 1961

• The members of the I D Bridge Club enjoyed a luncheon

at Harmon’s Restaurant Thursday and afterwards met at the home of Mrs. Joseph Busch on North Canal Street, for their

gift exchange and bridge. At the conclusion of the games first and traveling prizes went to Mrs. Fred Reinemeyer and second

prize was awarded to Mrs. Carl Behringer.

• In keeping with the holiday season the 80-voice Concert

Choir of St. John’s High School presented a lovely Christmas cantata Thursday night in the school gym following holy hour devotions. There was an exceptionally large turnout in which the two-month old choir made its debut.

• Mrs. Don May, Worthy Matron and Robert

McDonald, Worthy Patron of Delphos Chapter, No. 26. Order of the Eastern Star here presided at the chapter meeting

on Thursday in the Masonic Temple. Following the meet- ing, refreshments were served in the dining room. Mrs.

Kenneth Fronk and Mrs. Richard John were in charge of the

serving table.

  • 75 Years Ago — 1936

• A large number of the Delphos Eagles are expected to be

in attendance at the regular meeting of the order which is to be held tonight at the Eagles hall. Several important business

matters will be discussed. A feature of the evening will be the

serving of the annual ‘coon supper.

• John P. Gengler was elected as president of the German

Mutual Insurance Company at the annual meeting held

Saturday in Delphos. Henry F. Moenter was elected treasurer

and Joseph Beckman was named as secretary. The election for

the director of Putnam County for three years resulted in a tie between W. H. Schimmoeller and Louis B. Ricker. The final decision will be made on Jan. 2.

• The vested choir of the Methodist church went to

Oakwood Sunday night and presented a program at the

United Brethren Church at that place. About 35 members of

the choir and cast of characters were present. Rev. and Mrs.

Joseph C. Richards, Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Cordermann and

Mr. and Mrs. Alba Burgess and Ethel Burgess were also in

attendance.

Moderately confused

4 — The Herald Wednesday, December 28, 2011 www.delphosherald.com P OLITICS “There is no luck except

Gingrich sharpens attacks on Romney, Paul

By SHANNON

McCAFFREY

Associated Press

DYERSVILLE, Iowa — So much for staying positive.

In just the last 24 hours,

Republican presidential hopeful Newt Gingrich has blasted rival Mitt Romney as a “Massachusetts moder- ate” who isn’t “man enough” to take responsibility for the

harsh attack ads being run on

his behalf. And he lambasted

Ron Paul’s views as “total- ly outside the mainstream of virtually every decent

American.” As his lead in Iowa polls

has evaporated, Gingrich’s rhetoric has grown ever sharper, even as he insists — sometimes in the same breath — that he’s running a positive campaign.

“I am not going to go nega-

tive, period,” Gingrich said Tuesday at a campaign stop in Dyersville, Iowa, to apprecia- tive murmurs from the crowd that had crammed into the

National Farm Toy Museum

to hear him speak. That remark came after a CNN interview in which he said he wouldn’t vote for Paul if the Texas congressman became the GOP nominee and he mocked Romney for not having the courage to face him in a one- on-one debate. It is classic Gingrich, the bomb-throwing leader of the Republican revolution who even now seems to chafe at minding his manners. He

acknowledged Tuesday that it has taken “discipline” not to counterpunch as the attacks have flooded in. So he is trying to have it

both ways. A favorite Gingrich tech- nique in recent weeks has

been to extol his campaign’s positive tone while eviscerat- ing nameless GOP opponents, using words like “disgusting” and “reprehensible.” “Shame on them for not

caring enough about America

to be positive,” he said. In Dubuque, Iowa, at the first stop of a 22-city bus tour leading up to Jan. 3 caucus- es, Gingrich offered Romney praise, then promptly opened fire. “I don’t want to be invidi- ous about Gov. Romney, who

I said I think is a very com- petent manager and a very smart guy,” Gingrich said. “But to have somebody who is a Massachusetts moderate, who said he did not want to go back to the Reagan- Bush years, who voted as a Democrat for Paul Tsongas in ‘92, who campaigned to the

left of Teddy Kennedy

....

to

have him run a commercial

that questions my conserva- tism?” In the evolving Gingrich playbook, statements which

are factually accurate are not attacks. “I was describing him accurately,” he said in South Carolina last week after taking

a jab at Romney. For Gingrich, taking the

high road may be a strategy born as much out of necessity as ideology. His campaign nearly col- lapsed earlier this year, so he trails the other Republican frontrunners in fundraising, which limits his ability to launch a sustained negative campaign.

Gov’t to add new fee to health insurance

By RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR Associated Press

WASHINGTON —

Starting in 2012, the govern- ment will charge a new fee to your health insurance plan for research to find out which drugs, medical procedures, tests and treatments work

best. But what will Americans

do with the answers? The goal of the research, part of a little-known provi- sion of President Barack Obama’s health care law, is to answer such basic questions as whether that new prescrip- tion drug advertised on TV really works better than an old generic costing much less. But in the politically charged environment sur- rounding health care, the idea of medical effectiveness research is eyed with suspi- cion. The insurance fee could be branded a tax and drawn into the vortex of election- year politics. The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute — a quasi-governmental agency created by Congress to carry out the research — has yet to commission a sin- gle head-to-head comparison, although its director is anx- ious to begin. The government is already providing the institute with some funding: The $1-per- person insurance fee goes into effect in 2012. But the Treasury Department says it’s

not likely to be collected for another year, though insurers would still owe the money.

The fee doubles to $2 per covered person in its second year and thereafter rises with inflation. The IRS is expected to issue guidance to insurers within the next six months. “The more concerning thing is not the institute itself, but how the findings will be used in other areas,” said Kathryn Nix, a policy analyst for the conservative Heritage

Foundation think tank. “Will

they be used to make cover- age determinations?” The institute’s director, Dr. Joe Selby, said patients and doctors will make the deci- sions, not his organization. “We are not a policy-mak-

ing body; our role is to make the evidence available,” said Selby, a primary care physi- cian and medical researcher, But insurance indus - try representatives say they expect to use the research and work with employers to fine-tune workplace health plans. Employees and fam- ily members could be steered to hospitals and doctors who follow the most effective treatment methods. Patients going elsewhere could face higher copayments, similar to added charges they now pay for “non-preferred” drugs on their insurance plans.

Major insurers already are

carrying out their own effec- tiveness research, but it lacks

the credibility of government-

sponsored studies.

Not long ago, so-called “comparative effectiveness”

research enjoyed support

from lawmakers in both par-

ties. After all, much of the

medical research that doctors

and consumers rely on now is financed by drug companies and medical device manufac- turers, who have a built-in

interest in the findings. And

a drug maker only has to show that a new medicine is more effective than a sugar pill — not a competing medi- cation — to win government approval for marketing. The 2009 economic stimu- lus bill included $1.1 billion for medical effectiveness research, mainly through the National Institutes of Health. It was not considered particu- larly controversial. But things changed during the congres- sional health care debate, after former GOP vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin made the claim, now widely debunked, that Obama and the Democrats were setting up “death panels” to ration care.

As a result, lawmakers

hedged the new institute with caveats. It was set up as an independent nonprofit orga- nization, with a .org Internet

address instead of .gov. The government cannot dictate

Selby’s research agenda. And

there are limitations on how

the Health and Human Services department can use the research findings in decisions that affect Medicare and Medicaid.

Yemen’s leader causes headaches in DC

By BRADLEY KLAPPER and JULIE PACE Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The

Obama administration is weighing an unprecedented diplomatic act — whether to bar a friendly president from U.S. soil.

American officials were

evaluating on Tuesday an awkward request from Yemeni strongman and long- time U.S. counterterrorism

partner Ali Abdullah Saleh.

Saleh has said he plans to come to the United States for

medical treatment for injuries

suffered in a June assassina-

tion attempt, and he has asked for a U.S. visa for entry to the country. Fearful of appear- ing to harbor an autocrat with blood on his hands, the Obama administration was trying to ensure that Saleh visits only for medical care and doesn’t plan to stay, U.S. officials said. Washington’s hesitation reflects the shifting alli- ances and foreign policy strategy prompted by a year

of upheaval in the Arab

world. Saleh has served as

an American ally against al-

Qaida and will soon transfer power under a U.S.-backed deal with Yemen’s opposi- tion aimed at ending months

of instability. He isn’t subject

to any U.S. or international

sanctions. But he also is accused of committing gross human rights violations during a year of internal conflict, and the U.S. is trying not to burn any bridges with Yemeni political groups likely to take part in future governments. Political asylum for Saleh in the United States, or the appear- ance of preferential treatment from an administration that has championed peaceful and democratic change, would be highly unpopular with Yemenis who’ve fought to depose their dictator of 33 years. Officials close to the Saleh said Washington’s suspicion that he may seek political asylum was delaying approv- al of his trip. They spoke on condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of

the subject. But American

officials appeared to substan- tiate those concerns and said

they were troubled by Saleh’s recent comments portraying his trip as a move designed to ease the political transition. “What we’re looking at now is a request to come to the United States for the sole pur- pose of medical treatment,” State Department spokesman Mark Toner said, refusing to go into the specific of the evaluation. “That permission has not been granted yet.” Toner declined to elabo- rate on the assurances the United States wanted from Saleh or offer a timetable for a decision. He also couldn’t say whether any provisions existed under U.S. law to pre- vent the Yemeni leader from visiting the country — pro- vided he assures officials he demonstrates he’ll only stay temporarily. In that case, Saleh almost surely will be granted entry, U.S. officials said, speaking on condition of anonymity because visa evaluations are supposed to be confidential. It’s unclear when, if ever, the last time the head of state of a friendly government was blocked from visiting the United States.

No parade for troops as Iraq War ends

By BEN NUCKOLS and SAMANTHA GROSS Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Americans probably won’t

be seeing a huge ticker-tape

parade anytime soon for troops returning from Iraq, and it’s not clear if veterans of the nine-year campaign will

ever enjoy the grand, flag-

waving, red-white-and-blue homecoming that the nation’s fighting men and women received after World War II and the Gulf War. Officials in New York and Washington say they would

be happy to help stage a big celebration, but Pentagon officials say they haven’t been asked to plan one. Most welcome-homes have been smaller-scale: hugs from families at military posts across the country, a somber commemoration by President

Barack Obama at Fort Bragg

in North Carolina. With tens of thousands of

U.S. troops still fighting a

bloody war in Afghanistan,

anything that looks like a big

victory celebration could be seen as unseemly and prema- ture, some say. “It’s going to be a bit awkward to be celebrating

too much, given how much there is going on and how much there will be going on

in Afghanistan,” said Don

Mrozek, a military history professor at Kansas State

University. Two New York City coun- cilmen, Republicans Vincent

Ignizio and James Oddo, have called for a ticker-tape parade down the stretch of Broadway known as the Canyon of

Heroes. A similar celebration

after the Gulf War was paid for with more than $5.2 mil- lion in private donations, a model the councilmen would like to follow. Mayor Michael Bloomberg said last week that he was open to the idea but added, “It’s a federal thing that we really don’t want to do with- out talking to Washington, and we’ll be doing that.”

A spokesman for the mayor

declined to elaborate on the city’s reasons for consulting with Washington. Ignizio

said he had been told by the mayor’s office that Pentagon officials were concerned that a celebration could spark violence overseas and were evaluating the risk. Navy Capt. John Kirby, a Pentagon spokesman, said that he has not heard that issue raised and that New York has yet to make a formal propos- al. He also said officials are grateful communities around the country are finding ways to recognize the sacrifices of troops and their families. The last combat troops in Iraq pulled out more than a

week ago. About 91,000 U.S.

soldiers, sailors, airmen and

Marines are in Afghanistan,

battling a stubborn Taliban insurgency and struggling to

train Afghan forces so they

eventually can take over secu-

rity. Many U.S. troops who fought in Iraq could end up

being sent to Afghanistan. A parade might invite criti- cism from those who believe

the U.S. left Iraq too soon, as well as from those who feel

the war was unjustified. It

could also trigger questions about assertions of victory. Mrozek noted that President George W. Bush’s administration referred to

military action in the Middle East as part of a global war on terror, a conflict that’s hard to define by conventional mea- sures of success. “This is not a war on a particular place or a particular force,” he said. Bush himself illustrated the perils of celebrating mile- stones in the war, Mrozek said, when he landed on an aircraft carrier and hailed

the end of major combat

operations in Iraq behind a

“Mission Accomplished”

banner in May 2003. U.S. troops remained in Iraq for 8 1/2 more years, and Bush was criticized over the banner. The benchmarks were clearer in previous wars.

After World War II, parades

marked Japan’s surrender. After the Gulf War, celebra- tions marked the troops’ return after Iraqi forces were driven out of Kuwait.

www.delphosherald.com

The Herald – 5

Wednesday, December 28, 2011

www.delphosherald.com The Herald – 5 Wednesday, December 28, 2011

COMMUNITY

LANDMARK

www.delphosherald.com The Herald – 5 Wednesday, December 28, 2011 C OMMUNITY L ANDMARK Clark Mansion Van

Clark Mansion

Van Wert

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

6

TODAY

p.m.

Shepherds of

Christ Associates meet in the

St. John’s Chapel.

7

p.m.

Bingo

at

St.

John’s Little Theatre.

THURSDAY

9-11 a.m. — The Delphos Canal Commission Museum, 241 N. Main St., is open. 11:30 a.m. — Mealsite at Delphos Senior Citizen Center, 301 Suthoff Street. 5-7 p.m. — The Interfaith Thrift Shop is open for shop- ping.

FRIDAY

7:30 a.m. — Delphos Optimist Club, A&W Drive- In, 924 E. Fifth St. 11:30 a.m. — Mealsite at Delphos Senior Citizen Center, 301 Suthoff Street. 1-4 p.m. — Interfaith Thrift Store is open for shopping.

SATURDAY 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. — Delphos Postal Museum is open. 12:15 p.m. — Testing of warning sirens by Delphos Fire and Rescue 1-3 p.m. — The Delphos Canal Commission Museum, 241 N. Main St., is open.

SUNDAY HAPPY NEW YEAR!

MONDAY

11:30 a.m. — Mealsite

at Delphos Senior Citizen

Center, 301 Suthoff Street.

Happy Birthday DEC. 29 Kelsey Britt Dylan Stump Stephanie Renner Brian Strayer Roger Diltz Anna Spring
Happy Birthday
DEC. 29
Kelsey Britt
Dylan Stump
Stephanie Renner
Brian Strayer
Roger Diltz
Anna Spring
Logan Sickels
The Herald ...
Dena Martz photo
St. John’s Elemenetary School 1A class
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Students in St. John’s Elementary School 1A class include, front from left, Camden Teman, Victoria Beair and
Landen Grothaus; center, Nathan Ditto, Kaili Gillespie, Riley Taylor, Tyler Herron, Nolan Schwinnen and Morgan
Tyson; and back, Jack Gerker, Clayton Paddubny, Mia Conley, Lillyan Vonderwell, Kyle German and Jacob
Sterling. Maya Ostendorf was absent.
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Amish Cook shares fun holiday recipes COLUMN BY LOVINA EICHER These are some easy, fun holiday
Amish Cook shares
fun holiday recipes
COLUMN
BY LOVINA EICHER
These are some easy, fun
holiday recipes.
Blessings to all the
readers for a happy,
healthy New Year.
These recipes are
from my editor’s
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  • 7 p.m. — Delphos City

Council meets at the Delphos

Municipal Building, 608 N. Canal St.

Please notify the Delphos Herald at 419-695-0015 if there are any corrections or additions to the Coming Events column.

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6 – The Herald

Wednesday, December 28, 2011

www.delphosherald.com

6 – The Herald Wednesday, December 28, 2011 www.delphosherald.com

SPORTS

Lancers get by Musketeers in boys hardwood action

By Brian Bassett

Times Bulletin Sports Editor sports@timesbulletin.com

MIDDLE POINT — The Lincolnview Lancer basketball team hosted the Musketeers from Fort Jennings Tuesday night in a boys hardwood non- conference showdown and the Lancers jumped out early and held on late to secure the 53-47 victory. A 3-point- er by senior

6 – The Herald Wednesday, December 28, 2011 www.delphosherald.com S PORTS Lancers get by Musketeers in

guard Sloan W h i t a k e r opened the scoring on the night but Fort Jennings answered with the first of many baskets by senior center Cody Warnecke to pull within one. A Cody Warnecke bas- ket midway through the first quarter followed a trey by Lancer sopho- more guard Kyle Williams to make the score 10-7, Lincolnview. A Whitaker jump shot extended the Lancer lead to five, 12-7, before the Musketeers rallied and a pair of Cody Warnecke free throws brought Fort Jennings within one, 12-11. Another Whitaker jump shot extended the Lancer lead to 16-11 with

6 – The Herald Wednesday, December 28, 2011 www.delphosherald.com S PORTS Lancers get by Musketeers in
  • 56 seconds left in the first

quarter but a late basket by

junior guard Kurt Warnecke in the closing seconds made the score 16-11, Lincolnview, after a quarter of play. Junior guard Mark Evans opened the second quarter with a steal and layup. The basket sparked a Lincolnview run which was capped by a basket by senior forward Clayton Longstreth and a pair of Whitaker free throws to run the Lancer lead to 21-13. The Musketeers fought back and got consecutive 3-pointers by Cody and Kurt Warnecke to tie

the game at 23 with 2:37 left to play in the second quarter. Williams answered with a long jump shot for the Lancers and a Longstreth basket gave them some breathing room up 27-23. Whitaker and senior guard Nolan Neidert traded baskets to end the half. At the break, the Lancers led 29-25. Senior center Jeremy Kohli opened the second half with a basket for the Musketeers but three consecutive Longstreth jump shots extended the Lincolnview lead to eight, 35-27. Cody Warnecke then answered with a pair of bas- kets to bring Fort Jennings within four. An Evans steal and Longstreth layup later in the quarter again extended the Lancer lead to six, 40-34, but a Cody Warnecke 3-point play closed the quarter with the score 40-37, Lancers. Williams opened the fourth quarter with a 3-pointer to give Lincolnview a 43-37 advan- tage, which was cut to three, 47-44, on another 3-point play by Warnecke with 4:05 to play in the game. The Lancers slowed their pace to drain the clock with a 3-point lead late in the game and Fort Jennings was forced to foul starting with 1:33 to play. It took two more fouls and

  • 29 seconds before Jennings

sent Whitaker to the free- throw line shooting a 1-and-1. He converted to run the score to 49-44 but a Kurt Warnecke 3 brought Fort Jennings back within two with 50 seconds to play. The visitors would pull no closer, however, as Whitaker hit four more free

“Defensively, we could have played a little bit better; we put in some different things this week to see how we would work with them

I

... thought overall [we found success] when we man-to- man pressured them with the guards and things. And forced them to turn it over to get a little bit of a lead on them.

— Rob Welch, Lancer head coach

throws down the stretch to seal the 53-47 Lancer victory. “Defensively, we could

have played a little bit bet- ter; we put in some differ- ent things this week to see how we would work with

them

...

I

thought overall [we

found success] when we man-

to-man pressured them with the guards and things. And forced them to turn it over to get a little bit of a lead on them,” Lincolnview coach Rob Welch said. Welch said it was good to see the Lancers close out a game after having some close games slip away earlier in the season: “It’s always in the back of your head - what you’re going to do [in that sit- uation]. But we’ve been work- ing on those situations - what we need to accomplish, what we need to do - and the kids did them. Our kids responded and we put our best foul shoot- er at the line in Sloan.” Fort Jennings coach John Von Sossan was happy with the post play by his team, as Cody Warnecke recorded a game-high 24 points and Kohli added 10: “That was our point of emphasis; pound it inside because of their lack of size. We did an adequate job but had so many opportunities in the second half that we didn’t con- vert on which would have made a difference in the game.” “Their posts, those kids played very well. I’ve watched [Fort Jennings] on film, I though that was one of their better games. They did a lot of good things, they handled the ball well,” Welch added. Whitaker led the Lancers with 20 points, Longstretch added 15 and Williams 12. The win moves Lincolnview’s record to 3-4 on the season. The Lancer JVs also won 48-40. Lincolnview entertains Ottoville Friday, while Jennings hosts Columbus Grove Jan. 7.

Fort Jennings (47)

Von Sossan 1-4 0-0 3, Wiedeman

0-2 0-0 0, Neidert 1-2 0-0 2, C.

Warnecke

9-17 5-6

24,

J.

Kohli

5-9

0-0 10, K. Warnecke 3-5 0-0 8, Recker

0-1 0-0 0. Totals 19-40 5-6 47.

Lincolnview (53)

Leeth 0-2 0-0 0, Williams 5-9 0-0

12, Whitaker 6-15 7-8 20, Longstreth

6-12

2-3 15, McCleery 0-1 0-0

0,

Carey

1-2

0-0

2,

Evans 2-3

0-0

4.

Totals 20-44 9-11 53.

 

Score by Quarters:

Fort Jennings 13

12

12

10 -47

Lincolnview 16

13

11

13 -53

Three-point goals: Fort Jennings

4-13

(Von

Sossan

1-4, Wiedeman

0-1,

C.

Warnecke

1-2,

Kohli 0-1,

K. Warnecke 2-4, Recker 0-1), Lincolnview 3-13 (Leeth 0-1, Williams 2-6, Whitaker 1-5, Evans 0-1). JV score: 48-40 (Lincolnview).

Strong offensive night for Blue Jays lead win over Spencerville

By MALLORY KEMPER The Delphos Herald

mkemper2011@

hotmail.com

DELPHOS - The St. John’s girls basketball team put up impressive numbers at Robert A. Arnzen Gymnasium Tuesday night, hosting the Spencerville Bearcats. The Blue Jays shot 62 per- cent from the field and 42 percent from behind the arc to pick up the 62-48 non-league victory. The Blue Jays improved to 6-2 on the season and the Bearcats fell to 4-5 overall. “I thought in the first half we executed very well and confused them offensively changing our defense from man to zone,” St. John’s coach Dan Grothouse said. “I thought we caused some turn- overs and got out in front and executed very well around the basket.” The Blue Jays came out strong to take a 13-6 lead halfway through the open- ing quarter with two triples from senior Shelby Reindel and a triple from classmate Courtney Grothouse. St. John’s went 3-of-4 from behind the arc in the first quarter to take a 19-6 lead. St. John’s kept on roll- ing the second quarter with a couple of buckets from junior Katie Vorst and Grothouse. Grothouse led the Blue Jays in the first half with 15 points as St. John’s shot an impressive 7-of-12 from the field and 3-of-7 from beyond the arc. The Bearcats turned on their offensive spark the sec- ond half with back-to-back triples from freshman Schylar Miller. Senior Cortney Miller also hit two 3-pointers in the third quarter to bring the Bearcats within 16 at the half- way point. The Blue Jays kept their lead, 51-32, starting the final quarter of action.

“I thought in the first half we executed very well and confused them offensively changing our defense from man to zone. I thought we caused some turnovers and got out in front and executed very well around the basket.”

— Dan Grothouse, Lady Jays head coach

The two teams traded baskets in the fourth quarter. Junior Abby Freewalt hit two free throws for Spencerville to bring her team within 13 at the 4:20 mark. Grothouse and Vorst responded with two buckets to hold on for a Blue Jay victory. “If we would have played with the same amount of effort the first half that we did the second half, it would have been complete- ly different,” Spencerville coach Katie Krieg said. “We played very well offensively tonight and executed fairly well but we needed to do that all game.” Freewalt had a team-high 18 points for the Bearcats. Cortney Miller had 15 points shooting 5-of-9 from beyond the arc. Schylar Miller added 10 points. “They changed some things up at halftime and did a good job executing the second half but we were coming down on the other end and answer- ing what they were doing,” Grothouse added. “I thought we never got out of control

6 – The Herald Wednesday, December 28, 2011 www.delphosherald.com S PORTS Lancers get by Musketeers in

Tom Morris photo

St. John’s senior Julie Bonifas fires a pass over Spencerville’s Katie Merriman on an assist to teammate Katie Vorst Tuesday night at Arnzen Gymnasium. The Lady Blue Jays grabbed a 14-point home win.

tonight and got the ball inside when we needed to but also hit the outside shots.” Grothouse led all scor- ers with 22 points and seven rebounds. Vorst finished with 17 points and Reindel added 14 points. St. John’s hosts Fort Jennings Tuesday, while Spencerville visits Bluffton Jan. 12.

SPENCERVILLE (48)

Abby Freewalt 6-6-18, Cortney Miller 5-0-15, Schylar Miller 4-0-10,

Mackenzie Miller 1-0-3. Jennifer Post 1-0-2. Totals 9-8-6-48.

ST. JOHN’S (62)

Courtney Grothouse 6-6-22, Katie Vorst 7-3-17, Shelby Reindel 6-0-14, Emilie Fishbach 1-0-3, Erica Saine 1-0-2, Madison Zuber 1-0-2, Julie Bonifas 1-0-2, Jessica Recker 0-1-1. Totals 17-6-10-62.

Score by Quarters:

 

St. John’s

19

13

19

11 - 62

Spencerville

6

7

19

16 - 48

 

Three-point

goals:

Spencerville,

C.

Miller 5,

S.

Miller

2,

M. Miller;

St. John’s, Grothouse 3, Reindel

2,

Fischbach.

 

LOCAL ROUNDUP

Coldwater knocks off Jefferson matmen

COLDWATER

 

C o l d w a t e r b e s t e d Jefferson 54-24 in a wrestling

C o l d w a t e r b e s t e d Jefferson

dual

Tuesday

at Coldwater.

 

Jefferson

is

in

the

Plymouth

Invitational

on

Jan. 7.

Coldwater 54,

Jefferson 24

Bout Results

145

— Alex Timmerman (CW)

pin Reid Corzine, 2:19

152

— Brent Collett (CW) dec.

Darren Edinger, 13-12

160

— Jake Fink (CW) pin

Michael Joseph, 2:34

170

— Derek Collett (CW)

via Void

182

— Tyler Foust (DJ) pin

Ben Koesters, 1:08

195

— Colin McConnahea

(DJ) pin Luke Piper, 5:31

220

— Curtis Miller (DJ) pin

Justin Post, 5:14

285

— Quinton Wessel (DJ)

via Void

106

— Tyler Tebbe (CW) via

Void

113

— Jordan Obringer (CW)

Maj. Dec. Gaige Rassman, 13-2

120

— Mason Kuether (CW)

via Void

126

— Reese Kaiser (CW)

via Void

132

— Jeremy Post (CW)

Tech. Fall Tanner Vermule, 18-3

138

— Jake Schmidt (CW) pin

Austin Lee, 1:38

Indians edge Big Green boys

OTTOVILLE — A 37-31 lead after 24 minutes of action was enough for Shawnee to secure a 49-44 non-confer- ence boys hardwood con- test Tuesday night at L.W. Heckman Gymnasium.

Ottoville led 16-9 at the end of one quarter but the won the middle two visitors
Ottoville led
16-9
at
the
end
of
one quarter
but the
won
the middle two
visitors
periods 28-15.
K
e
v
i
n
S c h n i p k e
led
all
scor-

ers with 20 in pacing the

Big Green, while the Indians

(3-5) had three in twin dig-

its: Seth Rosenbauer with 14,

Troy Brock 14 and Thomas Nolte 10.

Ottoville

(2-5)

visits

Lincolnview Friday.

SHAWNEE (49)

Austin Lause 0-0-0, Elijah

Pughsley 0-1-1, Marquis Miller

2-2-6, Cole Pohjala 1-1-3, Thad Vernon 0-0-0, Troy Brock 5-0-

13, Thomas Nolte 2-5-10, Seth Rosenbauer 4-6-14, Kile 1-0-2. Totals 11-4-15/25-49.

OTTOVILLE (44)

Derek Schimmoeller 2-4-8,

Ryan Honigford 1-1-3, Austin Honigford 0-0-0, Brandt Landin

1-1-3, Luke Schimmoeller 1-3- 5, Cory Honigford 0-0-0, Bryan

Hohlbein 2-0-5, Kevin Schnipke 9-2-20. Totals 15-1-11/21-44.

  • ----- Score by Quarters:

Shawnee

9

15

13

12 - 49

Paul

Utendorf 0-2-2,

Ottoville

16

9

6

13 - 44

Kevan Unverferth 0-3-3, Drew

Three-point goals: Shawnee,

Stechschulte 2-7-11, Tyler

Brock

3, Nolte; Ottoville,

Kortokrax 2-3-7, Ben Schroeder

Hohlbein. JV score: 27-20 (Shawnee).

5-4-14, Austin Roebke 0-1-1, Nathan Kortokrax 3-0-6, Austin

  • ----- Horstman 4-5-13, Cody Mathew

Kalida boys knock off Redskins

KALIDA — Host Kalida defeated St. Henry 57-50 Tuesday night in non-league boys cage action at The Wildcat Den. Kalida took a 30-20 half- time lead and then held on in the fourth quarter to pick up the 57-50 victory. Kalida improves to 5-1 on the season. Ben Schroeder lead a trio of Wildcats in double figures with a double- double — 14 points and 11 rebounds. Austin Horstman added 13 points and Drew Stechschulte 11. Caleb Heitkamp had 13 points and Kyle Stahl 12 points for the Redskins. Kalida hosts Ada Friday in a game postponed from Dec. 2.

6 – The Herald Wednesday, December 28, 2011 www.delphosherald.com S PORTS Lancers get by Musketeers in

ST. HENRY (50)

Kyle Stahl 5-2-12, Bender 1-1- 4, Post 2-0-4, Uhlenhake 0-2-2, Davis 0-0-0, Luttmer 3-0-9, Caleb Heitkamp 5-0-13, Mikesells 2-0-

4, Knapke 1-0-2. Totals 12-7-

5/11-50.

KALIDA (57)

0-0-0. Totals 12-7-25/39-57.

Score by Quarters:

St. Henry

7

13

16

14 - 50

Kalida

14

16

10

17 - 57

Three-point goals: St. Henry,

Luttmer 3, Heitkamp 3, Bender;

Kalida,

none.

Field

goals:

St.

Henry 19-47 (7-26 3-pointers),

Kalida

16-43 (0-4 3-pointers).

Rebounds: St. Henry 32 (8 off.),

Kalida

33 (9 off.). Turnovers:

Kalida 9.

Elida tops Lima Senior

VARSITY LIMA SENIOR (63)

Tyler White 5-13-1-26, Devon Allen 2-0-0-4, Divante Hall 2-0-0- 4, Jerry Hutchins 3-3-3-18, Isiah Stinson 1-0-1-3, Malik Bingman 0-0-3-3. Totals 16-16/20-5-63.

ELIDA (80)

Ebin Stratton 0-1-1-4, Mike

McDonald 3-0-0-6, Reggie

M c A d a m s 6 - 2 - 1 - 1 9 ,
M c A d a m s
6
- 2 - 1 - 1 9 ,
Louis
Gray
1-0-0-2, Aric
Thompson
3
- 5 - 4 - 2 3 ,
D a k o t a
Mathias
8-2-0-18.
Totals
21-11/19-9-80.
Score by Quarters:
Lima Senior
13
15
20
Elida
25
18
16
15 - 63
21 - 80

Three-point goals: Lima Senior,

White,

Hutchins

3,

Bingman;

Elida,

Stratton, McAdams, A.

Thompson 2, Dakota Mathias 4

------

JUNIOR VARSITY: Lima

Senior 53-43.

Lady Knights win first game 53-32 in Ray Etzler Gymnasium

By Sean Lafontaine Times Bulletin cor- respondent sports@timesbulletin.com

CONVOY

The

Crestview Lady Knights

played their first game

in

the Ray Etzler Gymnasium

against Hicksville on Tuesday night and

used a big first half by applying defensive pressure and shoot- ing well from three to defeat the Aces, 53-32

The

Lady

Knights

the game on the assist from Kristin Hicks. Motycka would follow that score up with another two-point field goal off an offensive rebound to put the Lady Knights up by four. Kirstin Hicks then got a field goal of her own to make the score 6-0 in favor of Crestview. A few minutes later, Danica Hicks hit one of two foul shots to push the score to 7-0. After a Hicksville turnover, Mackenzie Richard and Mackenzie Riggenbach hit back-to-back threes to make the score 13-0, with just over 2:30 left in the quarter. Hicksville was finally

6 – The Herald Wednesday, December 28, 2011 www.delphosherald.com S PORTS Lancers get by Musketeers in

used a 13-0 run to begin

the game. Lindsey Motycka

got the scoring started

for

Crestview by hitting a short

jump

shot

30 seconds into

able to get on the board on a McKenzie Gonwick free throw. Then with under a minute to go in the first quar- ter, Megan Headley hit a two-point field-goal to make the score 13-3 at the end of the first. The second quarter was filled with runs by both teams but the Lady Knights would keep their momentum. Riggenbach hit her second three of the game to open the second quarter. Crestview went on an 8-0 run to, how- ever, the Lady Aces would go on a 7-0 run of their own in the middle of the quarter, leaving the score at 24-10 with 1:43 to play in the half. Crestview responded with

a 7-0 run to close out the first half with a 31-10 lead. “I was pleased with our intensity in the first half, especially on the defensive end. For us to have a 31-10 lead in the second half, I was very pleased with that. The intensity on the defensive end really carried over to the offensive side of the ball,” said Crestview coach Greg Rickard. The second half was a dif- ferent story. While the Lady Knights were able to preserve their lead, the two teams played an even second half, both scoring 22 points. “I was kind of disappoint- ed in the effort in the second half when you outscore them

by 21 in the first half. You’re not trying to run the score up, but you still want to play hard and I thought we lost our intensity in the second half. Most of the good things we can take out of this game came in the first half. We are looking to play that well consistently. We talked about playing up to our individual and team potential rather than playing to the skill level of the team you’re playing, and that is something we are still working on,” said Rickard. The Lady Knights shot 12-38 (31 percent) from two, and went 8-19 from three (42 percent) for a shooting total of 20-57 (35 percent). The Knights were led in

scoring by Danica Hicks, who scored 15 points. Riggenbach follwed with 12 points and Motycka also hit double dig- its, scoring 10 points. Hicksville’s Mckenzie Gonwick was the leading scorer in the game with 16 points. With the win, the Lady Knights move to 6-2 on the year. Crestview has a lengthy break before their next game. The Lady Knights won’t get back on the court until Jan. 9, when they travel to Continental to take on the Lady Pirates.

Crestview

-

Riggenbach

12,

Mercer 2, Richard 5, Motycka 10, D.

Hicks 15, K. Hicks 9 Hicksville - Gonwick 16, Headley 12, Smazenko 4

www.delphosherald.com

Wednesday, December 28, 2011

The Herald —

7

www.delphosherald.com Wednesday, December 28, 2011 The Herald — 7 Lady Jeffcats claw by Indians 54-50 By

Lady Jeffcats claw by Indians 54-50

By JIM METCALFE

jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com

DELPHOS — Jefferson’s half-court 1-3-1 trap did wonders in the fourth period, shutting out Fort Recovery the first 3:55 of the stanza. They also hit 7-of-10 free throws (11-of-21 overall for 52.4%) in the final 5:15 to subdue the Lady Tribe 54-50 in non-league girls action at The Stage of Jefferson Middle School. The game was moved from Jefferson High School. Fort Recovery missed its first five shots of the canto (15-of-44 for the night, 5-of- 21 downtown, for 34.1%). Despite the Red and White committing four turnovers in that span, they fortunately added 3-of-4 singles to build a 46-38 spread at 4:38. A 4-0 span in the next 43 seconds by the Indians got the guests within 46-42 on a 3-pointer by Kylie Kahlig (15 markers, 6 boards) at 3:22. That was as close as they could get as the hosts forced the visitors to chase and put it away at the free-throw line to snap a 3-game losing streak. “We couldn’t match up with tem in man-to-man; they weer attacking the bas- ket and getting us in foul trouble. We matched up bet- ter in our zone; it allows us to give better help inside and use our athleticism, forcing them to make higher pass- es,” Jefferson mentor Dave Hoffman noted. “We also kept them off the free-throw line better the second half and we got to the line. We ran our offense by spreading them out and we got some nice back-door cuts.” Jefferson sophomore Hannah Sensibaugh (8 mark- ers) was injured at 4:05 — fouling out — and had to

www.delphosherald.com Wednesday, December 28, 2011 The Herald — 7 Lady Jeffcats claw by Indians 54-50 By

Tom Morris photo

Jefferson senior Elizabeth Schosker elevates over Fort Recovery defenders Chelsea Pottkotter and Kylie Kahlig for a bucket late in the second period at The Stage. The Lady Wildcats grabbed a physical battle by four over the Indians.

helped from the game. The severity of her injury is not known at this time. “With (freshman) Brooke (Culp) already in a foot cast, we can’t afford another inju- ry to our guards. Hopefully, it won’t be serious,” Hoffman said. In the early going, with both teams looking to push the pace and make it a full-

court tempo, that seemed to suit the Lady Wildcats better as they forced eight turnovers (25 for the night) to only hav- ing four of their own (24). With the Tribe (6-1) looking to contain Jefferson senior Kennedy Boggs (15 mark- ers, 7 assists, 5 rebounds, 4 blocks, 4 seals), classmate Brittany Lewis (18 markers - 4 treys - 5 boards, 5 assists)

SPORTS BRIEFS

By The Associated Press FOOTBALL

NEW YORK — Tom Brady is one of eight Patriots and Patrick Willis one of eight 49ers to make the Pro Bowl, the most on each roster. Defending Super Bowl champi- on Green Bay (14-1), led by starting quarterback Aaron Rodgers, and Baltimore (11-4), led by linebacker Ray Lewis, have seven apiece for the Jan. 29 game in Honolulu. Players who make the Super Bowl will be replaced on the Pro Bowl rosters. Brady is one of seven start- ers from New England (12-3), join- ing receiver Wes Welker, tight end Rob Gronkowski, defensive tackle Vince Wilfork, defensive end Andre Carter, and guards Brian Waters and Logan Mankins. Special-teamer Matthew Slater is the other New England representative. Linebacker Willis, defensive Justin Smith, cor- nerback Carlos Rogers and tackle Joe Staley will start for the NFC from the 49ers (12-3). Green Bay’s Rodgers is the starting NFC quarterback, backed by record-setting Drew Brees of New Orleans. Fifteen first-time Pro Bowlers made the NFC squad, including Rogers, Staley and safety Dashon Goldson of the 49ers. Thirteen AFC players were first-time selections, including Gronkowski, Carter and Slater of New England. Carter is on injured reserve (left quadriceps) and won’t play. Three rookies were chosen:

Denver linebacker Von Miller, Cincinnati receiver A.J. Green, and Arizona cornerback Patrick Peterson, selected as a kick return specialist. SAN FRANCISCO — Struggling wide receiver Braylon Edwards was released by San Francisco 49ers following surgery on his right knee earlier this season that limited him. Edwards tweeted the news Tuesday, attributing the move to his injury, which “required more time to rehab and hasn’t allowed me to re-sync with the offense.” The 49ers confirmed Edwards’ release. Edwards had 15 catches for 181 yards and no touchdowns in eight games with five starts for the NFC West champion 49ers (12-3) after receiving a $3.5 million, one-year contract in August. PITTSBURGH — Pittsburgh Steelers coach Mike Tomlin said injured quarterback Ben Roethlisberger and center Maurkice Pouncey have a “shot” to play in the regular-season finale against Cleveland. Both players sat out Saturday in a 27-0 victory over St. Louis because of high ankle sprains. Veteran Charlie Batch passed for 208 yards in place of Roethlisberger, while a series of injuries forced Trai Essex to take snaps at center for the first time. NEW YORK — Paralyzed for- mer Rutgers player Eric LeGrand will attend the Denver Broncos’ home game against the Kansas City Chiefs on Sunday. LeGrand has been spend - ing this week in New York with his former Rutgers teammates as they prepare for the Pinstripe Bowl against Iowa State on Friday at Yankee Stadium. LeGrand sustained a spinal inju- ry in 2010 during a game against Army. He took this week off from physical rehabilitation to participate in bowl activities. LAKE FOREST, Ill. — The Chicago Bears placed quarterback Jay Cutler and running back Matt Forte on injured reserve, meaning they will miss the season finale at Minnesota. The Bears (7-8) have lost five straight since Cutler broke his thumb late in a win over San Diego Nov. 20, and things took another bad turn two weeks later when Forte sprained the

medial collateral ligament in his right knee against Kansas City. GREEN BAY, Wis. — Sales of Green Bay Packers stock have been so brisk since an initial offer- ing three weeks ago that the team is making another 30,000 shares available. The team initially offered 250,000 shares for sale starting Dec. 6. But the allotment is nearly gone, even though the shares cost $250 each and have virtually no resale value. The offering is sched- uled to end Feb. 29 or when all remaining shares are sold. The NFL’s only publicly owned team is applying the proceeds toward a $143 million expansion of Lambeau Field. Selling all 280,000 shares would raise $70 million. GREEN BAY, Wis. — A mid- February trial date has been set for Green Bay Packers linebacker Erik Walden on a disorderly conduct- domestic abuse charge. He pleaded not guilty to the misdemeanor, which stems from a dispute with his girlfriend last month. A judge set a trial date of Feb. 16, which is 11 days after the Super Bowl. NFL spokesman Greg Aiello said in an email to The Associated Press that the league will review the matter after the court case is resolved. FOXBOROUGH, Mass. — Houston Antwine, one of the Patriots’ top defensive players in their early years, and his wife, Evelyn, have died. Antwine, 72, died Monday in Memphis, Tenn., of heart failure, and his wife died Tuesday of lung cancer, the team said.

COLLEGE

COLUMBIA, Mo. — For the second time in less than two weeks, schools are objecting to a reform measure sought by university presidents and endorsed by NCAA President Mark Emmert. More than 75 schools are ask- ing to override a plan approved in October to allow multiyear athletic scholarships rather than the one- year renewable awards schools currently provide. That’s the mini- mum number of dissenters needed for reconsideration by the Division I Board of Directors when it meets next month in Indianapolis at the annual NCAA convention. The NCAA announced the change the Friday before Christmas. On Dec. 15, the NCAA sus- pended plans to give athletes a $2,000 stipend for living costs not covered by scholarships after at least 125 schools objected. The higher number of protests allows the organization to immediately put the change on hold. Both measures were pushed by Emmert and adopt- ed as emergency legislation after a presidential summit in August. PROVIDENCE, R.I. — A Rhode Island judge denied a request by West Virginia to dismiss a lawsuit filed by the Big East Conference over the university’s bid to make a quick exit for the Big 12. Providence County Superior Court Judge Michael Silverstein rejected all the university’s arguments for dismissal. The school argued the Rhode Island courts didn’t have the authority to decide the matter and should defer to the courts in West Virginia, where the first civil suit was filed in this dispute. The university also claimed it can’t be sued in Rhode Island because it has sovereign immunity

as an agency of the state of West Virginia and wasn’t properly notified by the Big East of its lawsuit. The Big East’s lawsuit seeks unspecified damages and an order that West Virginia stay in the confer- ence for 27 months. West Virginia accepted an invitation from the Big 12 in October and hopes to join in time for the 2012 football season. A trial in the case filed in West Virginia is scheduled for June 25, which is five days before the university plans to leave the Big East.

BASKETBALL

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Louisville’s Rick Pitino said he won’t coach past the 2016-17 season when his cur- rent contract ends. Louisville’s Athletic Association

granted the 59-year-old Pitino, the only men’s coach to lead three pro- grams to the Final Four, a four-year contract extension in August. He’ll make $3 million in base salary until the end of the 2013 season, fol- lowed by $3.9 million a year.

BASEBALL

WASHINGTON — A U.S. District Judge said a bankruptcy judge erred in freeing the Los Angeles Dodgers from provisions of its current Fox Sports TV contract. U.S. District Judge Leonard Stark released a 33-page ruling explaining his reasoning after he issued an order Friday to halt the Dodgers’ plans to sell the media

rights to games as part of the team’s impending sale. Fox currently has the rights to produce, record and telecast Dodgers games through 2013 sea- son. The contract gives Fox certain rights in negotiating an extension, including the right to talk exclusively with the team in advance of com- peting offers. But a judge handling the team’s bankruptcy proceedings ruled the “no-shop” provisions were unenforceable in bankruptcy. Fox has appealed that decision, which hurts its chances of hold- ing on to the broadcasting rights. Lawyers are set to argue the appeal before Stark in January.

HOCKEY

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Shea Weber, the star defenseman who leads the Nashville Predators in scoring, has a concussion and will miss a game Wednesday night against Minnesota. A team spokesman said Weber will be evaluated daily, with no timetable for his return. The team captain was injured Friday night against Dallas. He has eight goals and 21 assists in 35 games. TORONTO — Johnny Wilson, a four-time Stanley Cup champion with Detroit, has died. He was 82. Toronto Maple Leafs coach Ron Wilson announced his uncle’s death on Twitter. Johnny Wilson had 161 goals and 171 assists in 688 games in

11 season in the NHL with Detroit, Toronto, Chicago and the New York Rangers. He also coached Los Angeles, Detroit, Colorado and Pittsburgh. EDMONTON, Alberta — Tomas Hertl scored twice, Petr Mrazek made 12 saves and the Czech Republic opened the world junior hockey championship with a 7-0 victory over Denmark. Petr Holik, Dmitrij Jaskin, Tomas Filippi, Jiri Riha and Radek Faksa scored in the Group B game. Denmark was coming off an 11-3 loss to the United States Monday. At Calgary in Group A, Jur Simboch made 25 saves in Slovakia’s opening 3-1 victory over Latvia. Tomas Jurco, Michal Toman and Marek Tvrdon scored for Slovakia. Juris Ziemins scored for Latvia (0-2).

SOCCER

ZURICH — FIFA will not appeal a ruling by a Swiss court, clearing the way for the release of a docu- ment identifying soccer officials who took millions of dollars in kickbacks from World Cup broadcast deals. Soccer’s governing body said it will not comment on the document’s contents until its release has been cleared by the court. The decision by the state court in Zug court was reported by the Zurich business weekly Handelszeitung. The docu- ment details a settlement announced in 2010 in which senior soccer offi- cials acknowledged taking kickbacks and repaid $6.1 million. The 10-year-old scandal stems from alleged payments made by the ISL marketing agency before its 2001 collapse with debts of $300 million.

was the beneficiary of the attention, hitting a pair of 3-balls and a deuce. They took the lead with a 7-0 spurt in a span of a minute late in the first period and a Boggs — off a blocked shot — layin off the sequence with 37 ticks showing made for a 17-9 advantage. There were four ties and two lead changes in the canto. The Wildcats pushed the lead to 22-10 on a 3-ball by Lewis and a inside basket by senior Megan Gilden (7 caroms) at the 6:30 mark, forcing an Indian stoppage. Back came the visitors behind senior Kelly Nietfeld (15 counters, 6 boards), scoring five points as the visitors got within 24-23 on a free toss by Janelle Schwieterman (5 car- oms) at 1:54. However, they could not get the lead and the hosts got a steal and layin by Boggs and a mid-range jumper by senior Elizabeth Schosker with 13 ticks on the board for a 28-23 halftime margin. The Red and White scored the first five counters (a Boggs trifecta and a layin by Sensibaugh of the third canto to take their biggest lead of the night — 33-23 — at 7:11. Once more, the Tribe rallied behind five by Ericka Lennartz, including the sec- ond-of-2 tosses at 3:04 to knot the score at 35. However, the Tribe could not get the lead again. The Wildcats ran off an 8-3 spurt in the last 3:04, taking a 43-38 edge as J. Schwieterman hit the 1st-of-2 free throws at 14.5 ticks. “We hit a lot of big bas- kets, especially 3s. It seemed whenever we needed one, we hit it,” Hoffman added. “We got good minutes off our bench, especially our underclassmen like (sopho-

more) Rileigh (Stockwell - 8 boards) and Hannah. This was only her second start. That’s what we will need as we move on.” Fort Recovery hit 15-of-25 free throws (60%), grabbed 29 caroms (12 offensive) and added 19 fouls. Olivia Schwieterman dished six assists. Jefferson canned 19-of-42 fielders (5-of-13 triples) for 45.2 percent. They owned 33 boards (8 offensive). They were assessed 17 fouls and host Miller City for a 6 p.m. matchup Tuesday. The Jeffcats also won the junior varsity game 38-31. Sophomore Brooke Hesseling led the victors (5-3) with 14, while Tori Lennartz countered with 16 for the Tribe (5-2).

VARSITY FORT RECOVERY (50)

Abby May 1-0-3, Kelsey Fiely

1-0-2, Ericka Lennartz 3-0-7, Olivia

Schwieterman 1-2-5, Kylie Kahlig 5-3- 15, Janelle Schwineterman 0-2-2, Chelsea Pottkotter 0-1-1, Kelly Nietfeld 4-7-15. Totals 10-5-15/25-50.

JEFFERSON (54)

Samantha Thitoff 0-1-1, Courtney Lewis 5-4-18, Kennedy Boggs 5-4-

15, Rileigh Stockwell 1-2-4, Hannah Sensibaugh 4-0-8, Megan Gilden 1-0- 2, Elizabeth Schosker 3-0-6, Makayla Binkley 0-0-0. Totals 14-5-11/21-54.

Score by Quarters:

Ft. Recovery 9 14

15

12 - 50

Jefferson 17 11 15 11 - 54

Three-point goals: Fort Recovery, Kahlig 2, May, Lennartz, O. Schwieterman; Jefferson, Lewis 4, Boggs.

------

JUNIOR VARSITY FORT RECOVERY (31)

 

Sierra Pugh 1-0-3, Breanna Jutte 0-0-0, Cassidy Rammel 1-0-2, Kelsee

Ontrop 1-0-2, Caley Schoenherr 0-0-0, Kara Jutte 2-0-4, Tori Lennartz 8-0-16, Jackie Fullenkamp 2-0-4, Lexi Schmitz 0-0-0. Totals 14-1-0/4-31.

JEFFERSON (38)

Heather Pohlman 1-0-2, Lindsay Deuel 0-0-0, Shelby Koenig 2-4-8, Brooke Hesseling 4-6-14, Jasmine

McDougall 0-2-2, Gabrielle Pimpas 0-2-2, Makayla Binkley 1-1-4, Katie Goergens 2-2-6. Totals 9-1-17/27-38.

Score by Quarters:

 

Ft. Recovery 9

4

8

Jefferson

9

8

8

10 - 31 13 - 38

Three-point goals: Fort Recovery,

Pugh; Jefferson, Binkley.

NBA GLANCE

By The Associated Press

 

Phoenix

0

1

.000

1

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division

Monday’s games

 
 

W

L

Pct

GB

Toronto 104, Cleveland 96

 

New York

1

0

1.000

Charlotte 96, Milwaukee 95

Toronto

1

0

1.000

Indiana 91, Detroit 79

New Jersey

1

1

.500

1/2

Orlando 104, Houston 95

Philadelphia

0

1

.000

1

New Jersey 90, Washington 84

Boston

0

2

.000

1 1/2

Oklahoma City 104, Minnesota

Southeast Division

 

100

 

W

L

Pct

GB

Denver 115, Dallas 93

 

Miami

2

0

1.000

San Antonio 95, Memphis 82

Atlanta

1

0

1.000

1/2

New Orleans 85, Phoenix 84

Charlotte

1

0

1.000

1/2

Sacramento 100, L.A. Lakers 91

Orlando

1

1

.500

1

Portland 107, Philadelphia 103

Washington

0

1

.000

1 1/2

Golden State 99, Chicago 91

Central Division

W

 

L

Pct

GB

Tuesday’s games

 

Indiana

1

0

1.000

Atlanta 106, New Jersey 70

 

Chicago

1

1

.500

1/2

Miami 115, Boston 107

Milwaukee

1

1

.500

1/2

Milwaukee 98, Minnesota 95

Cleveland

0

1

.000

1

Portland 101, Sacramento 79 L.A. Lakers 96, Utah 71

Detroit

0

1

.000

1

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division

 

Wednesday’s games

Indiana at Toronto, 6 p.m. Miami at Charlotte, 7 p.m.

 

W

L

Pct

GB

Washington at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.

San Antonio

1

0

1.000

New Orleans

1

0

1.000

Cleveland at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. Boston at New Orleans, 8 p.m.

Houston

0

1

.000

1

Oklahoma City at Memphis, 8 p.m.

Memphis

0

1

.000

1

L.A. Clippers at San Antonio, 8:30

Dallas

0

2

.000

1 1/2

Northwest Division

 

p.m. Utah at Denver, 9 p.m.

 

W

L

Pct

GB

Oklahoma City 2

1

0

0

Pacific Division

 

0

1.000

Philadelphia at Phoenix, 9 p.m.

Portland 2

0

1.000

New York at Golden State, 10:30

Denver

0

1.000

1/2

p.m.

Utah

1

.000

1 1/2

 

Minnesota

2

.000

2

Thursday’s games

New Jersey at Orlando, 7 p.m. San Antonio at Houston, 8 p.m.

 

W

L

Pct

GB

Dallas at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.

L.A. Clippers

1

0

1.000

Chicago at Sacramento, 10 p.m.

Sacramento

1

1

.500

1/2

Golden State

1

1

.500

1/2

Denver at Portland, 10 p.m. New York at L.A. Lakers, 10:30

L.A. Lakers

1

2

.333

1

p.m.

 

NHL GLANCE

 

By The Associated Press

 

Phoenix

36

18

15

3

39 95

96

All Times EST

Los Angeles

36

17

14

5

39 80

88

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division

Anaheim

35

10

19

6

26 83

115

 

GP

W

L

OT Pts GF

GA

NOTE:

Two points

for

a

win,

one

point for

N.Y. Rangers

34

22

8

4

48 102

72

overtime loss.

Philadelphia

Pittsburgh

35

36

21

21

10

11

4

4

46 119

46 118

104

93

Monday’s games

Colorado 4, Minnesota 2

Tuesday’s games

 

New Jersey

35

19

15

1

39 97

103

Buffalo 4, Washington 2

N.Y. Islanders

34

11

17

6

28 77

111

Northeast Division

 

N.Y. Rangers 3, N.Y. Islanders 0 Carolina 4, New Jersey 2

 

GP

W

L

OT Pts GF

GA

St. Louis 5, Dallas 3

Boston

33

23

9

1

47 119

63

Detroit 4, Nashville 1

Toronto

36

18

14

4

40 113

118

Ottawa

37

17

15

5

39 113

128

Chicago 4, Columbus 1

Buffalo

35

17

15

3

37 96

103

Vancouver 5, Edmonton 3

Montreal

37

Southeast Division

GP

14

W

16

L

7

35 94

OT Pts GF

103

GA

Los Angeles 4, Phoenix 3 Anaheim 3, San Jose 2

Florida

37

19

11

7

45 99

101

Calgary 2, Columbus 1, SO Pittsburgh 4, Carolina 2

 

Winnipeg

36

17

14

5

39 100

105

Montreal 6, Ottawa 2

Washington

34

17

15

2

36 100

105

Tampa Bay 5, Philadelphia 1

Tampa Bay

35

15

17

3

33 95

117

Florida 5, Toronto 3

Carolina

38

12

20

6

30 97

127

WESTERN CONFERENCE

 

Detroit 3, St. Louis 2

Central Division

Winnipeg 4, Colorado 1

 

GP

W

L

OT Pts GF

GA

Wednesday’s games

 

Chicago

36

23

9

4

50 122

103

Buffalo at New Jersey, 7 p.m.

 

Detroit

36

23

12

1

47 118

81

N.Y. Rangers at Washington, 7:30 p.m.

St. Louis

36

21

11

4

46 94

80

Minnesota at Nashville, 8 p.m.

Nashville

36

18

14

4

40 96

103

Los Angeles at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.

Columbus

36

9

22

5

23 87

123

Boston at Phoenix, 9 p.m.

Northwest Division

 

Vancouver at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.

 

GP

W

L

OT Pts GF

GA

Thursday’s games

 

Vancouver

36

22

12

2

46 120

88

Calgary at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.

 

Minnesota

37

20

12

5

45 88

86

Philadelphia at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.

Calgary

37

18

15

4

40 92

99

Toronto at Carolina, 7 p.m.

Colorado

38

19

18

1

39 101

111

Montreal at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.

Edmonton

35

15

17

3

33 96

96

Edmonton at Minnesota, 8 p.m.

Pacific Division

Los Angeles at Winnipeg, 8:30 p.m.

 

GP

W

L

OT Pts GF

GA

Columbus at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.

San Jose

33

19

11

3

41 97

80

Phoenix at Colorado, 9 p.m.

Dallas

35

20

14

1

41 95

101

Vancouver at Anaheim, 10 p.m.

In the winter of 1891-92 a Canadian physical education instructor James Naismith (1861-1939) invented the sport of basketball, to provide indoor exercise and competition for his students between the end of the football season and the start of the baseball season. He was an instructor at the YMCA Training School (now Springfield College) in Springfield, Massachusetts. In 1959 he was voted to the Basketball Hall of Fame, located in Springfield (its official name is the Naismith Memorial Hall of Fame).

BOWLING

Tuesday Merchant

Dec. 20, 2011

Caballero’s

8-0

Surveyor’s

6-2

Unverferth Mfg. 6-2

R C Connections

4-4

Delphos Sporting Goods

4-4

Topp Chalet

4-4

Adams Automotive

4-4

Kerns Ford

2-6

Ace Hardware

2-6

Men over 200

Jay Brown 210-217-205, Don Rice 235-235, Dan Grice 300-245-248, Bruce Haggard 246-203, David Mahlie 236-233, Lenny Klaus 202-223, Jason Mahlie 214-237, Ron Mericle

217, Jerry Mericle 202, Ryan

Kies

226, Mike Hughes 202-

224-245,

Shane

Schimmoller

203, Todd Merricle 224-257,

Scott

Scalf

235-258, John

Jones

232-220, John Allen

217,

Jason

Wagoner 212-

221, Joe Geise 208-246-234,

Lee

Schimmoller 203-206,

Kyle

Early

235-213,

Andrew

Schimmoller

244-207, Russ

Wilhelm

212,

Josh DeVelvis

216-203, Dave Stemen 221-

223,

Denny Dyke 205-246,

John Adams 213, Larry Etzkorn

218, Alex VanMetre 226-229-

228.

Men over 550

Jay Brown 632, Don Rice

665,

Dan Grice 793, Bruce

Haggard

621,

David

Mahlie

658, Lenny Klaus 598, Jason Mahlie 650, Rod Klinger 565,

Ron

Mericle 602, Ryan Kies

608, Mike Hughes 671, Shane Schimmoller 566, Todd Merricle

630,

Scott Scalf 685, John

Jones

642, John Allen 568,

Jason Mahlie 621, Joe Geise 688, Lee Schimmoller 581, Kyle

Early 594, Andrew Schimmoller

628, Russ Wilhelm 591, Josh

DeVelvis

618, Dave Stemen

637,

Denny Dyke 614, John

Adams 587, Bruce VanMetre 577, Alex VanMetre 683.

Wednesday Industrial

Dec. 21, 2011

Topp Chalet

8-0

Niedeckens

8-0

Rustic Cafe

8-0

Villager Tavern 6-2 DRC 13th Frame Lounge 4-4 Moe’s Dougout 4-4

K&M Tire

2-6

D&D Grain

0-8

Delp. Restaurant Supply 0-8

Cabo’s

0-8

Men over 200

Frank Miller 201-224- 202, Joe Geise 204-213-237, Charlie Lozano 207-223, John Allen 230, John Jones 216,

Greg Kill 213, Bob White 206, Matt Hoffman 204-247, Justin Rahrig 217-219, Clint Harting 250, Shawn Stabler 246, Dave Kreischer 215, Butch Prine Jr. 214-219, Jeff Kreischer 248-

259-224, Jason Hefner 221, Ben

Jones 212, Coda Henze 215, Mike Eversole 214-214, Dave Jessee 217, Sean Hulihan 204, Terry Trentman 245-214, Lenny Hubert 212-206-263, Bruce Moorman 211, Bill Warnimont 211, Dale Riepenhoff 212, Don Rice 202-213, Brian Gossard 214, Shawn Allemeier 223-211- 211, Dan Grice 211-216, Matt Elling 220-212, Ted Furley 267, John Beebe 212-203-234.

Men over 550

Frank MIller 627, Joe Geise

654, Charlie Lozano 622, John Jones 603, Harold Beckner 554, Matt Hoffman 604, Justin Rahrig 562, Clint Harting 638, Shawn Stabler 606, Dave Kreischer 602, Butch Prine

Jr.

590, Jeff Kreischer 731,

Jason Hefner 566, Ben Jones 594, Coda Henze 573, Mike Eversole 619, Terry Trentman 610, Lenny Hubert 683, Bruce Moorman 575, Don Rice 605, Brian Gossard 554, Shawn Allemeier 645, Dan Grice 619, Matt Elling 627, Ted Furley 608, John Beebe 649.

Thursday National Dec. 22, 2011

First Federal

8-0

Westrich

8-0

C

B 97

6-2

Day Metals

6-2

V

F W

4-4

D

R C Big Dogs

4-4

Bowersock Hauling

2-6

K-M Tire

2-6

Wannemacher’s

0-8

Men over 200

John Jones 224-233, Rick Suever 214-202-210, Doug Milligan Jr. 203-209, Don Rice 225-290-212, Sean Hulihan 233, Brian Gossard 214-224, Rob Ruda 203-245, Jeff Menke 234, Randy Ryan 210-204, Brad Hughes 210-215, Mark Biedenharn 203-258, Dave Moenter 227-267, Jason Mahlie 224, Bruce Moorman 201, Brian Schaadt 223-218, Don Eversole 202-258, Bruce VanMetre 236- 253, Jeff Lawrence 207, Ray Geary 222, Ron Mericle 213- 213, Tom Schulte 208, Chuck Verhoff 203, Dave Knepper

202, Paul Burkholder 206-225, Dave MIller 242-224, Frank MIller 232-215, Tim Koester 224-245, Ted Wells 204, Jason Wagoner 248, Doug Milligan Sr. 266-209-204.

Men over 550

John Jones 639, Rick Suever 626, Doug Milligan Jr. 564, Don Rice 727, Sean Hulihan 597, Brian Gossard 614, Rob Ruda 644, Jeff Menke 626, Randy Ryan 589, Brad Hughes 620, Mark Biedenharn 622, Dave Moenter 686, Jason Mahlie 592, Bruce Moorman 553, Brian Schaadt 602, Don Eversole

646, Bruce VanMetre 680, Jeff Lawrence 591, Ray Geary 596, Ron Mericle 616, Tom Schulte 573, Chuck Verhoff 567, Dave Knepper 571, Paul Burkholder 587, Dave Miller 659, Frank Miller 639, Tim Koester 663, Ted Wells 552, Jason Wagoner 624, Doug Milligan Sr. 679.

8 — The Herald

Wednesday, December 28, 2011

www.delphosherald.com

8 — The Herald Wednesday, December 28, 2011 www.delphosherald.com

BUSINESS

Survey: Home prices down in most major US cities Wall Street Driven to get a good
Survey: Home prices down
in most major US cities
Wall Street
Driven to get a
good used car
By DEREK KRAVITZ
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON — U.S. home prices fell
in most major cities for the second straight
month, further evidence that the housing
recovery will be bumpy and weigh on the
broader economy in 2012.
The Standard & Poor’s/Case-Shiller index
released Tuesday showed prices dropped in
October from September in 19 of the 20 cities
tracked.
The decline reflects the typical fall slow-
down after the peak buying season. Prices had
risen modestly in April through August in at
least half of the cities tracked.
Still, home prices have fallen roughly 32
percent nationwide since the housing bubble
burst five years ago and are back to 2003 lev-
els, according to the index.
Prices are even lower in hard-hit areas,
such as Atlanta, Cleveland, Detroit, Phoenix
and Las Vegas. Washington, New York, Los
Angeles and San Diego have seen the smallest
declines.
Home values remain depressed despite
some modest progress in the housing market.
Residential construction is likely to add to
U.S. economic growth in 2011, the first time
that has happened in four years. That’s mainly
because apartments are being built almost
twice as fast as two years ago — reflecting a
surge in renting and weaker home sales.
The Case-Shiller index measures prices
for roughly half of all U.S. homes. Prices are
compared with those in January 2000 and
the index is based on a three-month moving
average. The monthly data are not seasonally
adjusted.
Atlanta, Detroit and Minneapolis post-
ed the biggest monthly declines. Prices in
Atlanta and Las Vegas fell to their lowest
points since the housing crisis began. Prices
rose in Phoenix after three straight monthly
declines.
David M. Blitzer, chairman of S&P’s index
committee, said steep price drops in cities
such as Atlanta, Chicago, Cleveland, Detroit
and Minneapolis were particularly worrisome
because their gains earlier this season were
so strong.
“Atlanta and the Midwest are regions that
really stand out in terms of recent relative
weakness,” Blitzer said. “These markets were
some of the strongest during the spring/sum-
mer buying season.”
Americans are reluctant to purchase a
home more than two years after the recession
officially ended. High unemployment and
weak job growth have deterred many would-
be buyers. Even the lowest mortgage rates in
history haven’t been enough to lift sales.
Some people can’t qualify for loans or
meet higher down payment requirements.
Many with good credit and stable jobs are
holding off because they fear that prices will
keep falling.
Sales of previously occupied homes are
barely ahead of 2008’s dismal figures — the
worst in 13 years. And sales of new homes
this year will likely be the worst since the
government began keeping records a half
century ago.
Prices are likely to fall further once banks
resume millions of foreclosures. They have
been delayed because of a yearlong gov-
ernment investigation into mortgage lending
practices.
Foreclosures and short sales — when a
lender accepts less for a home than what is
owed on a mortgage — are selling at an aver-
age discount of 20 percent.
Stocks barely
changed in
light holiday
trading
BRUCE WILLIAMS
NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks
ended barely changed in light
trading Tuesday amid mixed
economic news. Consumer
confidence surged to an eight-
month high, but home prices
dropped in major cities. Sears
plummeted after reporting that
it would close more than 100
stores around the country.
The Dow Jones industrial
average closed down just 2
points after staying in a nar-
row range all day. The S&P
500 index and Nasdaq eked out
small gains.
In the latest sign of a bumpy
recovery in the housing market,
home prices fell in 19 of the 20
cities tracked by the Standard
& Poor’s/Case-Shiller index.
Atlanta, Detroit and Minneapolis
posted the biggest declines.
Prices in Atlanta and Las Vegas
fell to their lowest points since
the housing crisis began.
That report dampened inves-
tors’ enthusiasm about a jump
in consumer confidence to the
highest level since April. The
New York-based Conference
Board reported that its
Consumer Confidence Index
rose almost 10 points to 64.5 in
December. Economists watch
the numbers closely because
consumer spending accounts
for about 70 percent of U.S.
economic activity.
Smart
Money
Mulligan’s Pub and Bistro announces new manager
VAN WERT — Mulligan’s
Pub and Bistro, located at
Hickory Sticks Golf Club on
U.S. 127 in Van Wert, would
like to announce its new man-
ager Kindra Butler. Butler
comes to Mulligan’s Pub and
Bistro with over 10 years
of restaurant experience, not
only in management but own-
ership and entrepreneurship.
Butler’s responsibili -
ties will include restaurant
management, food services,
catering and event planning.
Butler hopes to take event
planning to a new level for
Van Wert to include corpo-
rate events, wine tastings,
VIP parties, and other events
including “Ladies Night Out”,
family nights, golf course
incorporated and other live
entertainment and outdoor
patio events.
Although Butler’s official
start date is Jan. 1,
the Pub and Bistro
will be closed from
Dec. 30 through
April 1, 2012. Over
this shut-down
period, she will
still be available
for catering and
facility rentals and
event planning, but
other functions and
a grand re-opening
Butler
and prepare for next year’s
events and extended hours,
including Sunday Brunches,”
stated Mark
White, co-owner
of Mulligan’s Pub
and Bistro. “We
are really excited
to have Kindra
on board and feel
strongly that she
will take our vision
for the Pub even
further, making it
a destination of
choice within the
will take place after
April 1.
“Our goal within this
shut-down period is to allow
Kindra the opportunity to
revamp the menu, carry-out
staff meetings and trainings
area,” White added.
Butler’s family includes
her husband Jerry, 2 step-
children and 2 step-grand -
children. She is an active
member of the Rotary Club
of Van Wert and enjoys
golfing, cooking and play-
ing piano. She is also an
active member of the Leota
Braun Foundation board in
Rockford and attends First
United Methodist Church in
Van Wert.
“One of my main goals
with the Pub and Bistro is to
make it ‘the place to go’ in
Van Wert for food, entertain-
ing and socializing,” stated
Butler. “I am looking for-
ward to utilizing this winter
to plan and prepare for a great
grand re-opening in Spring
2012 that will include great
customer service and a high
quality product.”
Mulligan’s Pub and Bistro
will remain open under the cur-
rent menu and hours through
Friday. The kitchen hours are
Thursdays and Fridays 5-10
p.m. and Saturdays 4-10 p.m.,
with the bar remaining open
until midnight each of these
nights. The banquet facility
and Pub is also available for
private rentals and parties dur-
ing this time.
Advertise your business in
The Delphos Herald
...
419-695-0015
to four months, part of our
mortgage was sold to another
company. We then had to pay the
new mortgage company, which
was OK, just frustrating that we
had to deal with two companies.
We continued making payments
until we refinanced in 2007, and
now we have a new mortgage
through someone else.
Our problem lies with the
second company (the one to
which our original company sold
part of our mortgage). It is no
longer in business. I understand
it was shut down because
it failed to abide by federal
funding laws. This puts us in a
bind, because neither company
filed lien releases regarding our
mortgage, when it was paid in
full. I have contacted the bank
almost daily and get the same
answer: They will escalate it to
the reconveyance department,
but nothing ever happens.
How can I get the bank to
submit an affidavit stating that
it is the successor for Wilshire,
and that it has no interest in
our mortgage? Do I just hire an
attorney? Does the bank have
access to all the closed mortgages,
being as it acquired all the loans?
Do I have a legitimate reason to
sue the bank? How can I get a
satisfaction of title in the state of
Oklahoma? -- C.W., via email
DEAR C.W.: A mortgage can
be sold, not only once but maybe
three or four times. The original
lender may or may not enter
into an agreement with the new
owner to service the contract. It’s
true that some lenders will issue
the lien releases and so forth,
but what’s in it for them? If they
don’t, have they lost anything?
Of course not.
Hire an attorney. Believe it
or not, that’s what you should
have done originally. Using an
attorney for legal matters is not
a big deal, and it should not cost
you a bunch of money.
You ask whether you have
a legit reason to sue one of the
banks involved. The general
answer is that you can sue
anybody for anything. As to
whether there will be any award
or whether it will be sufficient to
cover your expenses, generally
speaking, the answer is no. As
to getting the satisfaction of title
in Oklahoma or anywhere else,
hire a professional. I know that’s
not the answer you are looking
for, but for goodness sake, you
have been trying to sell your
house and the deals are not going
down because of a relatively
small problem. Bite the bullet
and spend the money. Good luck
with your new purchase.
WEBB
FREE
INSURANCE
AGENCY, INC.
basic computer training for adults
Send your questions to Smart
Money, P.O. Box 2095, Elfers,
FL 34680. Send email to bruce@
brucewilliams.com. Questions of
general interest will be answered
in future columns. Owing to the
volume of mail, personal replies
cannot be provided.
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Classes are FREE and forming
212 W. High - Lima, 419-228-3211
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DEAR BRUCE: Our last
used car (13 years old) appeared
to be in decent condition when
we bought it, but it bled us dry
on repair costs before it finally
died. We thought we were being
prudent with our finances by
buying a used car, but this one
ended up being a money pit.
This experience has motivated
us to look for a much more
dependable used car to replace
this one. We are using Consumer
Reports as a source for reliability
data so we won’t wind up with
another lemon. A Honda Civic is
appealing to us as a very reliable/
durable car.
Conventional wisdom says
the value of most new cars
goes down dramatically over
the first three years, but that
doesn’t seem to be the case for
Hondas. According to Kelley
Blue Book, a 5-year-old Honda
Civic LX Sedan 4D with 57,500
miles from a dealer should cost
$15,765 (81 percent of the new
price). A 2-year-old Honda
Civic LX Sedan 4D with 24,500
miles should go for $19,215 (99
percent of the new price). A new
2012 Honda Civic, with zero
miles and a full warranty, costs
about $19,425. So does it really
make sense to purchase a Honda
or similar high-reliability car
used? What are your thoughts?
-- M.T., via email
DEAR M.T.: Like any
purchase, including a new car,
sometimes you are going to get
stung. Just because one used
car didn’t work out would not
persuade me that buying used
cars is a bad idea. For many
years, when I was still raising
children and had school and
other expenses, I purchased used
cars and seldom regretted it.
As to the Civic and its
holding values, you mentioned
buying from a dealer. If you buy
a used car from a dealer (there
is nothing wrong with that), you
can expect to pay a great deal
more than you would on the
open market from an individual.
If you look carefully, you will
find a used automobile that will
cost considerably less to buy,
insure and operate.
By all means, before you
make the final decision on any
car, have a good mechanic
examine it. Expect to pay $200
to $300 for that inspection. It is
very much to your advantage.
I understand you have done
careful research, but I would
quarrel with the numbers you
have come up with. There is
no way in the world I’d buy a
25,000-mile car for 99 percent of
the new price. I am sure you can
do a great deal better.
If you are very carefully
watching your budget, a good
used car is the way to go.
Understand, you just can’t go out
on a Thursday night and decide
you want to buy one. It may
take a month or two and a fair
amount of diligence, but properly
executed, the search for the right
car is very rewarding.
DEAR BRUCE: We have
been trying to sell our home
for the last two months, but
we continue running into brick
walls. We have prominent buyers
who have money in hand and are
ready to close, but we can’t. After
reading your columns, I decided
to ask for your advice.
When we were approved
for our home loan, we had one
mortgage company. After three
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www.delphosherald.com

Wednesday, December 28, 2011

The Herald — 11

www.delphosherald.com Wednesday, December 28, 2011 The Herald — 11

Preventive care: It’s free, except when it’s not

By CARLA K. JOHNSON AP Medical Writer

CHICAGO — Bill Dunphy thought his colonoscopy would be free. His insurance company told him it would be covered 100 percent, with no copayment from him and no charge against his deductible. The nation’s 1-year-old health law requires most insurance plans to cover all costs for preven- tive care including colon cancer screening. So Dunphy had the procedure in April. Then the bill arrived: $1,100. Dunphy, a 61-year-old Phoenix small busi- ness owner, angrily paid it out of his own pocket because of what some prevention advocates call a loophole. His doctor removed two noncancer- ous polyps during the colonoscopy. So while Dunphy was sedated, his preventive screening turned into a diagnostic procedure. That allowed his insurance company to bill him. Like many Americans, Dunphy has a high- deductible insurance plan. He hadn’t spent his deductible yet. So, on top of his $400 monthly premium, he had to pay the bill. “That’s bait and switch,” Dunphy said. “If it isn’t fraud, it’s immoral.” President Barack Obama’s health overhaul encourages prevention by requiring most insur- ance plans to pay for preventive care. On the plus side, more than 22 million Medicare patients and many more Americans with private insurance have received one or more free cov- ered preventive services this year. From cancer screenings to flu shots, many services no longer cost patients money. But there are confusing exceptions. As Dunphy found out, colonoscopies can go from free to pricey while the patient is under anes- thesia. Breast cancer screenings can cause confusion too. In Florida, Tampa Bay-area small business owner Dawn Thomas, 50, went for a screening mammogram. But she was told by hospital staff

“‘Confusion’ is not the word I’d apply to the medical offices produc- ing the bills. The word that comes to mind for me ain’t nearly so nice.”

- Insurance Broker Bonnie Milani

that her mammogram would be a diagnostic test — not preventive screening — because a previous mammogram had found something suspicious. (It turned out to be nothing.) Knowing that would cost her $700, and knowing her doctor had ordered a screening

mammogram, Thomas stood her ground. “Either I get a screening today or I’m put- ting my clothes back on and I’m leaving,” she remembers telling the hospital staff. It worked. Her mammogram was counted as preventive and she got it for free.

“A lot of women

are getting labeled with

... that diagnostic code and having to pay year after year for that,” Thomas said. “It’s a loophole so insurance companies don’t have to pay for it.” For parents with several children, costs can pile up with unexpected copays for kids needing shots. Even when copays are inexpensive, they can blemish a patient-doctor relationship. Robin Brassner of Jersey City, N.J., expected her doc- tor visit to be free. All she wanted was a flu shot. But the doctor charged her a $20 copay. “He said no one really comes in for just a flu shot. They inevitably mention another ail- ment, so he charges,” Brassner said. As a new patient, she didn’t want to start the relationship by complaining, but she left feeling irritated. “Next time, I’ll be a little more assertive about it,” she said. How confused are doctors? “Extremely,” said Cheryl Gregg Fahrenholz,

an Ohio consultant who works with physicians. It’s common for doctors to deal with 200 dif- ferent insurance plans. And some older plans are exempt. Should insurance now pay for aspirin? Aspirin to prevent heart disease and stroke is one of the covered services for older patients. But it’s unclear whether insurers are supposed to pay only for doctors to tell older patients about aspirin — or whether they’re supposed to pay for the aspirin itself, said Dr. Jason

Spangler, chief medical officer for the nonparti-

san Partnership for Prevention. Stop-smoking interventions are also sup- posed to be free. “But what does that mean?” Spangler asked. “Does it mean counseling? Nicotine replacement therapy? What about drugs (that can help smokers quit) like Wellbutrin or Chantix? That hasn’t been clearly laid out.” But the greatest source of confusion is colonoscopies, a test for the nation’s second leading cancer killer. Doctors use a thin, flex- ible tube to scan the colon and they can remove precancerous growths called polyps at the same time. The test gets credit for lowering colorectal cancer rates. It’s one of several colon cancer screening methods highly recommended for adults ages 50 to 75. But when a doctor screens and treats at the same time, the patient could get a surprise bill. “It erodes a trust relationship the patients may have had with their doctors,” said Dr. Joel Brill of the American Gastroenterological Association. “We get blamed. And it’s not our fault,” Cindy Holtzman, an insurance agent in Marietta, Ga., is telling clients to check with their insurance plans before a colonoscopy so they know what to expect. “You could wake up with a $2,000 bill because they find that little bitty polyp,” Holtzman said. Doctors and prevention advocates are ask- ing Congress to revise the law to waive patient

costs — including Medicare copays, which can run up to $230 — for a screening colonos- copy where polyps are removed. The American Gastroenterological Association and the American Cancer Society are pushing Congress fix the problem because of the confusion it’s causing for patients and doctors. At least one state is taking action. After com- plaints piled up in Oregon, insurance regulators now are working with doctors and insurers to make sure patients aren’t getting surprise charges when polyps are removed. Florida’s consumer services office also reports complaints about colonoscopies and other preventive care. California insurance bro- ker Bonnie Milani said she’s lost count of the complaints she’s had about bills clients have received for preventive services. “‘Confusion’ is not the word I’d apply to the medical offices producing the bills,” Milani said. “The word that comes to mind for me ain’t nearly so nice.” When it’s working as intended, the new health law encourages more patients to get preventive care. Dr. Yul Ejnes, a Rhode Island physician, said he’s personally told patients with high deductible plans about the benefit. They weren’t planning to schedule a colonoscopy until they heard it would be free, Ejnes said. If too many patients get surprise bills, how- ever, that advantage could be lost, said Stephen Finan of the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network. He said it will take federal or state legislation to fix the colonoscopy loop- hole. Dunphy, the Phoenix businessman, recalled how he felt when he got his colonoscopy bill, like something “underhanded” was going on. “It’s the intent of the law is to cover this stuff,” Dunphy said. “It really made me angry.” ——— AP Medical Writer Carla K. Johnson can be reached at http://www.twitter.com/ CarlaKJohnson

Suspect in girl’s death cared for her grandfather

By TOM LoBIANCO and TOM COYNE Associated Press

FORT WAYNE, Ind. — To assist her dying father, Tarah Souders made a choice: She moved her three young girls to a run- down trailer park in rural Indiana to help take care of him as his lungs rotted from emphysema. She knew it could be dangerous. The park of about two dozen homes was teeming with convicted sex offenders, with one living at nearly every address. She worried about neighbors with sex offense records who had been helping her father get by, according to trailer park residents. And before she arrived, she even asked her father if her children could be at risk for abuse from two specific men — including a suspect now accused in her daughter’s death. “He said, ‘No. They will not touch your children. They’re doing everything they’re supposed to do,”’ said Greg Shumaker, one of 15 convicted sex offenders who live at the park and the other man that Souders had inquired about. Not long after they moved, police say, a horrific tragedy unfolded. Her 9-year-old daughter, Aliahna Lemmon, was brutally killed. Police say 39-year-old Michael Plumadore told investigators that he bludgeoned her to death last week with a brick, then dis- membered her and hid her head, hands and feet at her grandfather’s trailer before dumping the other remains elsewhere. Shumaker said Aliahna’s family moved there to help take care of 66-year-old James E. “Shorty” Lemmon, who also was a con- victed sex offender and died Dec. 3. He said Lemmon was “getting old” and “had trouble breathing.” Shumaker said he introduced Plumadore to Lemmon shortly after Plumadore moved into the trailer park, and Plumadore moved in with Lemmon a few days later. Shumaker said he knew Lemmon because they were both sex offenders and were in jail together. Sheriff’s department spokesman Cpl. Jeremy Tinkel con- firmed that Lemmon was a sex offender. Indiana Department of Correction records show he was convicted of child molesting in March 2006. Paulette Hair, 45, a former manager at the trailer park who lives at a nearby trailer park, said she also knew Lemmon was a sex offender. “He stayed out of everybody’s way,” she said. “Shorty couldn’t

Can tourists help US economy?

By CRISTINA SILVA Associated Press

take care of himself very well.” Shumaker said Plumadore briefly moved away, but returned when Souders asked him to care for her father. A man who answered the door at Souders’ home Tuesday after- noon referred all questions to the Allen County sheriff’s depart- ment. The home was one of only a few at the trailer park — located off an expressway and across from an open field — with signs of children: A small bicycle, play car and car seat sat on the wooden porch connected to a long wooden ramp. Aliahna and her two younger sisters were staying with Plumadore for about one week because their mother had been sick with the flu. Richard Patee, 58, whose trailer is next to where Plumadore was living, said he didn’t think it was odd that Aliahna’s mother had him watching the girls for an extended period. “They had known each other for somewhere of three to four years, I know that, and he took care of their grandfather,” Patee said. “I didn’t see any reason to question it at all.” Shumaker said it wasn’t unusual for Plumadore to watch Souders’ children “because the kids liked him.” Souders and Aliahna were listed among nearly 600 friends on a Facebook page listed under Plumadore’s name that said he was “Self Employed and Loving It!”, and enjoyed fantasy novels. According to the affidavit, Plumadore told police that after beating Aliahna to death on the front steps of the home in the early morning hours Thursday, he stuffed her body into trash bags and hid her in the freezer. He said he later cut up her body with a hack- saw and stuffed her remains into freezer bags. The next morning, Plumadore made a trip to a convenience store to buy a cigar, according to surveillance video and The Journal Gazette. Police said Plumadore told them he had hidden Aliahna’s head, feet and hands at the trailer and discarded her other remains at a nearby business. Police obtained a warrant to search the trailer on Monday and found the body parts. Authorities didn’t say Tuesday why Plumadore killed the child, but Sheriff Ken Fries said investigators suspected Plumadore was involved since soon after she was reported missing Friday night because of inconsistencies in his story that the girl had vanished while he went to a store that morning.

Paul’s surge prompting a new look

By PAUL J. WEBER Associated Press

LAS VEGAS — Agustina Ocampo is the kind of foreign trav- eler businesses salivate over. The 22-year-old Argentine recently dropped more than $5,000 on food, hotels and clothes in Las Vegas during a trip that also took her to Seattle’s Space Needle, Disneyland and the San Diego Zoo. But she doubts she will return soon. “It is a little bit of a headache,” said Ocampo, a student who waited months to find out whether her tourist visa application would be approved. More than a decade after the federal government strengthened travel requirements after the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, foreign visitors say getting a temporary visa remains a daunting and some- times insurmountable hurdle. The tourism industry hopes to change that with a campaign to persuade Congress to overhaul the State Department’s tourist visa application process. “After 9/11, we were all shaken and there was a real concern for security, and I still think that concern exists,” said Jim Evans, a for- mer hotel chain CEO heading a national effort to promote foreign travel to the U.S. At the same time, he said, the U.S. needs “to be more cognizant of the importance of every single traveler.” Tourism leaders said the decline in foreign visitors over the past decade is costing American businesses and workers $859 billion in untapped revenue and at least half a million potential jobs at a time when the slowly recovering economy needs both. While the State Department has beefed up tourist services in recent years, reducing wait times significantly for would-be visitors will likely be a challenge as officials try to balance terrorist threats and illegal immigration with tight budgets that limit hiring. “Security is job one for us,” said Edward Ramotowski, managing director of the department’s visa services. “The reason we have a visa system is to enforce the immigration laws of the United States.” Anti-immigration proponents argue travel to the U.S. is already too accessible and that allowing more visitors would put the nation at greater risk. “Everybody would like to find a way to admit as many people as possible to visit here providing that they visit and then go home,” said Jessica Vaughan, director of policy studies at the Center for Immigration Studies, an anti-immigration group based in Washington, D.C. “A lot of consular officers underestimate how much people want to come and live here,” she said. Nearly 7.6 million nonimmigrant visas were issued in 2001, compared with fewer than 6.5 million in 2010. The number of visa applicants also dropped sharply after 2001. Those combined forces pushed the U.S. share of global travelers down to 12 percent last year, from 17 percent before 2001.

SAN ANTONIO — Ron Paul wants to legalize pot and shut down the Federal Reserve. He thinks the federal government has no authority to outlaw abortion, no business bombing Iran to keep it from acquiring a nuclear weapon, and no justification to print money unless it’s backed up by gold bars. And he might win the Iowa caucuses. The closer the first votes of the 2012 presidential campaign get, the more competitive the Texas congressman has become. It’s a moment his famously fervent supporters have longed for. Plenty of others are asking: What’s Ron Paul about, again? As in his two prior quixotic campaigns for president, Paul has toiled for months as a fringe candidate best known for staking out libertarian positions. As every other Republican candidate lined up to attack President Barack Obama’s health care law and to promise tax cuts, Paul again demanded audits of the Federal Reserve and a return to the gold standard. Leading in some state polls, Paul is getting a look from main- stream voters in Iowa, where the 76-year-old obstetrician has emerged as a serious contender in the Jan. 3 caucuses — and in other early voting states, should he pull off a victory. The sudden rush of attention to Paul’s resume hasn’t been kind. He’s spent the past week disowning racist and homophobic screeds in newsletters he published decades ago, including one following the 1992 riots in Los Angeles that read, “Order was only restored in L.A. when it came time for the blacks to collect their welfare checks three days after rioting began.” “Everybody knows I didn’t write them and they’re not my sen- timents, so it’s sort of politics as usual,” Paul said during a recent Iowa campaign stop. Looking to cut into Paul’s support, rivals laid into him on Tuesday. In an interview on CNN, Newt Gingrich said Paul holds “views totally outside the mainstream of virtually every decent American.” And Rick Santorum chided, “The things most Iowans like about Ron Paul are the things he’s least likely to accomplish and the things most Iowans are worried about about Ron Paul are the things he can accomplish.” Paul returns to Iowa on today, giving his impressive grass- roots organization in the state a last chance to present, and perhaps defend, positions he’s staked out over a long political career and reiterated during the 13 Republican debates held this year. Paul has served a dozen terms in Congress as a Republican, but he espouses views that have made him the face of libertarianism in the U.S. He blames both Republicans and Democrats for run- ning up the federal debt and opposes any U.S. military involve- ment overseas. He wants to bring home all troops from all U.S. bases abroad.

Firefighters offered counseling

JOHN CHRISTOFFERSEN Associated Press

STAMFORD, Conn. — A Christmas morning fire that killed a couple and three of their grandchildren was devastating to fire- fighters who rushed into the engulfed home twice frantically look- ing for the victims before they were beaten back by the flames. Stamford officials were offering counseling to the firefighters. “After 37 and a half years, 38 years, on the job, you’re never prepared for anything like this,” acting fire Chief Antonio Conte said Tuesday. “It’s heart-breaking. I had to re-call 70 firefighters today for debriefing, and most of them broke down.” Authorities on Tuesday described frantic, futile attempts to save the three girls and their grandparents after embers in a bag of discarded fireplace ashes started the accidental fire at the grand waterfront house, which was being renovated. Of the seven people in the home, only two survived: the girls’ mother, a New York City fashion advertising executive; and a family friend who had worked on the home as a contractor and is believed to have placed the ashes in or outside an entryway, near the trash. Flames quickly entered the house, spread throughout the first floor and licked upstairs, trapping the girls, the grandparents, the mother and the contractor, the city fire marshal said. That’s when screams began to wake neighborhood residents, soon followed by the whine of fire engines. As flames shot from the home, owner Madonna Badger climbed out a window onto scaffolding, screaming for her chil- dren and pointing to the third floor. Firefighters used a ladder and construction scaffolding outside the house to reach the third floor, but heat and poor visibility in a hallway turned them back, said Brendan Keatley, a Stamford firefighter who was at the scene. The family friend, Michael Borcina, told firefighters on the ground that he had taken two girls to the second floor, but that they got separated because of the heat. Firefighters then went to the second floor but again were forced out by the blaze’s inten- sity. “Not for (not) trying, that’s for sure,” Conte said. There was somebody else trying to save the girls, too — their grandfather, Lomer Johnson. One of the girls, found dead just inside a window, had been placed on a pile of books, apparently so he could reach in and grab her after he jumped out. Instead, authorities say, Johnson fell through the roof outside the window and was found dead in the rear of the house. He and his wife, Pauline, both of Southbury, had been visiting their daughter for the holidays. The grandmother also died in the fire along with 10-year-old Lily and 7-year-old twins Grace and Sarah. One girl was found dead on the third floor, and the body of another was found with the grandmother’s at the bottom of the stairs leading to the third floor.

Answers to Tuesday’s questions: In American diner slang of yore, a “Noah’s boy” was a slice
Answers to Tuesday’s questions:
In American diner slang of yore, a “Noah’s boy” was a
slice of ham, a reference to Noah’s second son, Ham.
A porcupine acquires a fully-developed set of quills
within days — sometimes hours — of birth. The quills
start out soft and bendable but harden quickly.
Today’s questions:
What inspired ice-cream maker William Dreyer to
name a flavor Rocky Road?
The first players in the All-American Girls Professional
Baseball League were required to attend what special eve-
ning classes during spring training?
Answers in Thursday’s Herald
Today’s words:
Bozart: fine arts
Sinciput: the forehead
Today’s joke:
A New Yorker was forced to take a day off from work
to appear for a minor traffic summons. He grew increas-
ingly restless as he waited hour after endless hour for
his case to be heard.
When his name was called late in the afternoon, he
stood before the judge, only to hear that court would be
adjourned for the rest of the afternoon and he would
have to return the next day.
“What for?!” he snapped at the judge.
His honor, equally irked by a tedious day and sharp
query, roared out loud: “Twenty dollars contempt of
court! That’s why!”
Then, noticing the man checking his wallet, the judge
relented:
“That’