impact

the world the world

Harvard Graduate ScHool of education
Message from the Dean Passion for Practice ProMise that Transforms Policy PoTenTial realized Through research learning at the nexus extraordinary Faculty living the Harvard University advantage an exceptional location after Harvard 2 4 6 8 10 12 16 18 20

academic ProGramS
Master of education (ed.M.)
Arts in Education Education Policy and Management Higher Education Human Development and Psychology International Education Policy Language and Literacy Learning and Teaching Mind, Brain, and Education Prevention Science and Practice/Certificate of Advanced Study (C.A.S.) in Counseling School Leadership Special Studies Teacher Education Technology, Innovation, and Education 24 26 28 30 32 34 36 38

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Doctor of education leadership (ed.l.D.) Doctor of education (ed.D.)

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detailS and numberS
applying for admission Harvard Graduate school of education — at a Glance 56 57

impact
the world
Will you be the wisdom that brings calm to teenage years? Will you inspire a college dream that revolutionizes the way we think? Will you be the first to recognize a leader of humankind? Will you be a movement that demands justice and social equality? Will you be a ray of hope for a forgotten community? Will you be the science that revolutionizes the way we learn? Will you be the spark that illuminates a mind? Will you be the PaSSion that rejects the status quo? Will you be the PromiSe that transforms education across the globe? Will you be the pursuit of Potential waiting to be realized? How will your future unfold? How will you impact the world? Will you be a hero to children beginning their adventures through life?

To Our Prospective Applicants, Education is the foundation of a just society. Global competitiveness, scientific discoveries, and engaged active citizenship all rest on this foundation. Our Ed.D., Ed.M., and doctorate in education leadership (Ed.L.D.) programs are designed to prepare and inspire a new generation of education leaders. HGSE graduates are practice-based researchers and research-based practitioners who are committed to improving the lives of learners. Education is the civil rights issue of our time — join us in this meaningful work. Dean Kathleen McCartney

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To prepare leaders in education and to generate knowledge to improve student opportunity, achievement, and success.

The Harvard Graduate School of Education regularly creates history as one of the world’s leading institutions in education practice, policy, and research. Its achievements include:
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studying the relationship between social inequality and educational opportunity led associate Professor John Diamond to a four-year study of distributed leadership in an urban school. He hopes that thinking of leadership as a contextual, distributed activity rather than a singular, individual quality will help future school leaders be more effective. a sociologist of education, Diamond continues active research on leadership, change, race, and opportunity in urban and suburban schools.

Pioneering the first Master of Arts in Teaching program in the United States in 1920 Establishing such innovative programs throughout the 1950s and 1960s as the Laboratory of Human Development, the Administrative Career Program, and Project Zero, founded in 1967 to improve education in the arts Initiating several unique programs in the 1980s and 1990s, including the nationally renowned MidCareer Math and Science Program Creating the Doctoral Program in Education Leadership (Ed.L.D.) in 2009 — the only program of its kind in the nation — in collaboration with faculty from the Harvard Business School and the Harvard Kennedy School

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A school of education that consistently ranks among the nation’s best. A university that is among the best in the world. A historic city recognized as a global center of education and innovation. A faculty of world-renowned scholars, teachers, researchers, policymakers, and leaders in their fields. since 1920, those with a passion to impact the world as educators have found an almost unlimited breadth and depth of opportunities at the Harvard Graduate school of education. Whether you are a recent college graduate, an experienced educator eager to make a bigger impact in your field, or a successful professional seeking a change of career, here you will receive an education that does nothing less than open the doors of your mind. So you may translate your passion into practice and achievement. So you may develop the knowledge, skills, confidence, and commitment you need to be an inspiring teacher, counselor, educator, and leader. So you may impact the lives of learners in any corner of the globe, whether it is in a refugee camp in sub-Saharan Africa, within a high school classroom in Boston, across a school district in Atlanta, or at one of California’s college and universities.

mark Hecker, ed.m.’09 / executive director, reach, inc.
Mark Hecker started as a teacher in Washington, D.C.; eventually, he became an award-winning social worker. As he worked with teens, he discovered that many struggled to read and that there were few literacy programs for them. He arrived at the Harvard Graduate School of Education with a goal: learn how to build a nonprofit organization to improve teen literacy. At HGSE, Hecker found teachers, other students, and connections to people outside the school who were already working on the problem. He soaked it all up. By the time he spoke to his fellow graduates at the HGSE convocation in June 2009, he had a simple message: “Get to work.” Hecker followed his own advice. He returned to D.C. to found Reach, Inc., a nonprofit that gives struggling teen readers an opportunity to tutor in high-need elementary schools. “This is a unique model where the teenagers are accountable for real outcomes that aren’t all about them. They are social beings, so when we make it about other people, then you have a chance at making an actual change.” Hecker reflects on starting Reach, Inc., “I’m happy with how things are going, but there’s still a long way to go.”

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a political theorist and philosopher of education, associate Professor Meira levinson draws on insights from a variety of disciplines, as well as from her years of teaching experience. Widely published on such subjects as civic achievement, political theory, and multicultural education, her work delves deeply into how race, ethnicity, immigration status, and class unjustly affect individuals’ civic and political engagement.

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At HGSE, you’ll belong to a community of practitioners whose passion for education extends far beyond campus and deep into communities across the nation and around the world. HGSE develops and delivers programs and publications that connect the innovative research of our faculty with practitioners and policymakers in the field, including:
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Programs in Professional education (PPe), including The Principals’ Center, provides numerous opportunities for educators to expand their skills. Faculty-led programs are delivered onsite and online for teachers, principals, administrators, and policymakers. Each year, PPE offers 30-40 professional education opportunities for preK–12, higher education, and international educators and administrators. WiDe World, an innovative professional development program, builds on more than 30 years of leading research to offer interactive, online experiences that teach and model effective education practices for educators all over the world. The Harvard education Publishing Group seeks to contribute to the greater understanding of educational issues of central importance to society, as well as serve as a forum for different perspectives within education. It publishes the Harvard Educational Review, Harvard Education Letter (newsletter on preK–12 research and practice), and books through the Harvard Education Press.

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senior lecturer Judith Mclaughlin, director of the ways to impact the world as an expert on higher

Higher education Program, has been finding different education leadership. as chair of the Massachusetts Public education nominating Council, she identifies potential trustees for the state’s universities. For 20 years, she has chaired the annual Harvard seminar for

new Presidents, which helps prepare first-time college presidents for the challenges of their position.

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transforms

Perhaps your passion for education also extends beyond the classroom. Maybe your dream is to help the world fully realize the transformative promise of education. By analyzing the consequences of federal, state, and local policies on student learning and educational equity. By inspiring, transforming, and implementing policy within different socioeconomic and cultural contexts. This is the place. After all, HGSE has long been at the forefront in negotiating the challenges posed by the rapidly changing landscape of modern education. By connecting theory, research, and practice in order to create more effective policy. By contributing to national and global conversations on the future of education. By collaborating with leaders across Harvard University, and around the globe, to seek innovative, multidisciplinary solutions to educational problems. We may be a community defined by an uncommon diversity of intellectual, professional, cultural, and ethnic backgrounds and perspectives, but what brings us together is a single, shared belief that education is the most powerful force toward a just society.

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nancy Hill / Professor of education / Suzanne murray Professor, radcliffe institute
“I’ve wanted to be a developmental psychologist since middle school. I am interested in how people think, how they make sense of things, and how they make decisions. While doing my dissertation on upward mobility in African-American women, I realized we can actually help kids and families through research. At HGSE, I found a thrilling interdisciplinary context to do my work and highly engaged students who come to the classroom with experience in the world and a drive to take what they’re learning back into the world to improve it. Ethnic and economic gaps in achievement are not just things to wring our hands about. Our health as a nation is dependent on our ability to fully educate every child in the U.S. You cannot be innovative if you’re not educated. Education is the issue of our time.” Professor Nancy Hill sees HGSE students as problem-solvers, motivated in class, in the lab, and in the world. She brings practicum students into her lab to interview parents and develop solutions for families trying to create upward mobility for their children. Her research focuses on variations in the parenting and family socialization practices across ethnic, socioeconomic status, and neighborhood contexts.

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Explore fundamental questions about early childhood learning and development. Study youth negotiation programming in Latin America. Help identify effective leadership practices toward large-scale organizational change within urban school districts in the United States. if your quest is to help create the kind of new, breakthrough knowledge that enables humanity to better realize its own potential, this is where you want to be. Few institutions offer you as many opportunities to inform, influence, and impact the world of education by conducting relevant and usable research in human development, cognition, and curriculum to understand and strengthen teaching and learning processes. Fewer still offer you access to so many distinguished leaders in diverse fields, ranging from education, neuroscience, molecular biology, genetics, medicine, and public health, to psychology, sociology, economics, public policy, law, business, and communications. And none can unlock opportunities to develop your potential better than Harvard University and its affiliated institutions and organizations.

Kurt fischer/ charles bigelow Professor of Human development & Psychology/ director, mind, brain, and education (mbe) Program / director, dynamic development laboratory
“You don’t find a program like MBE at most education schools, but the reality is that biology can really help you create a more effective environment for learners, which may be why we attract students and visiting scholars from across the nation, as well as from universities in China, Japan, Argentina, the Netherlands, England, and Germany,” says Fischer, who has spent a lifetime studying human development and behavior. “For example, about 25 percent of our students and faculty in the MBE Program have an interest in learning disabilities, such as dyslexia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Well, to understand biology is to understand that kids with dyslexia have a lot of specific talents. This allows you, in turn, to figure out how best to create effective learning strategies to help them focus on the talents they have.” The author of several defining books and numerous groundbreaking scientific articles in the field, Fischer heads an active group of collaborators at the Ed School’s Dynamic Development Laboratory that draws on a variety of fields ranging from psychology, pedagogy, and neuroscience, to philosophy, anthropology, linguistics, and computer science to study development and change in such diverse areas of school-related skills as reading, arithmetic, and social interaction. If you’re interested in research that impacts the world of education in profound ways, he’s the kind of teacher and researcher you’re likely to collaborate with at the Ed School.

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Professor Kurt Fischer leads an active group of collaborators in the Dynamic Development laboratory working to explore, understand, and explain the order behind variations in people’s behavior.

Coming from diverse professional and academic backgrounds, our students find numerous opportunities to collaborate in meaningful research with their peers, their professors, and the larger community of educators. Examples of current research programs and initiatives at HGSE include:
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The Center for education Policy research (CePr) works with university-based researchers and policymakers to bring student achievement data to bear in evaluating policies and drawing implications for reform. CEPR engages stakeholders in the field in a collaborative way to ensure that research questions are addressing real, high-priority challenges for education leaders. The Center on the Developing Child (CDC) is a multidisciplinary initiative that draws upon the breadth of intellectual resources across Harvard University’s schools and affiliated hospitals to leverage science to enhance child well-being through innovations in policy and practice. CDC views healthy child development as the foundation of economic prosperity, strong communities, and a just society. Project Zero enhances learning, thinking, and creativity in the arts, as well as humanistic and scientific disciplines, at the individual and institutional levels. This research group creates communities of reflective, independent learners to enhance deep understanding within disciplines and to promote critical and creative thinking. The Harvard Family research Project strives to increase the effectiveness of public and private organizations and communities as they promote child development, student achievement, healthy family functioning, and community development. Their work addresses the interests of policymakers, practitioners, researchers, evaluators, philanthropists, teachers, administrators, and concerned individuals. The Collaborative on academic Careers in Higher education (CoaCHe) is a consortium of colleges and universities committed to making the academic workplace more attractive and equitable for early-career faculty — the cohort most critical to the long-term future of their institutions.

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On the ground floor of Larsen Hall, the Jeanne Chall Reading Lab has become the nexus for the Language and Literacy Program at HGSE. Master’s and doctoral students gather here to collaborate, prepare for practica, and conduct research. The lab houses children’s books and magazines, literacy assessments, instructional programs, and reference resources on the research and practice of reading instruction. Researchers also have access to technology, such as video-capturing and editing equipment, and students looking for professional development resources will find reading and writing instruction footage. Lecturer Pamela Mason, director of the Language and Literacy Program and the Jeanne Chall Reading Lab, declares, “Our program is grounded in the belief that language and literacy skills are essential to every aspect of an individual’s life and that literate individuals contribute positively to our social, cultural, and economic well-being. Our work focuses on the many factors that influence the development of language and literacy skills across the life span,

learning at the nexus

with particular emphasis on improving instruction, research, and policy nationally and internationally.”

The next generation of practitioners, counselors, thinkers, researchers, and policymakers. The next generation of educators who impact the world. HGSE graduates leaders capable of meeting the complex educational challenges of a world increasingly characterized by unprecedented social, economic, cultural, ethnic, and technological change. A primary reason for this is our ability to influence the world’s approach to the study of education through flexible curricular and programmatic offerings that serve as national models, and, above all, by constantly reflecting upon, and making innovative changes to, our own approach to education. We lead the way by integrating practice, policy, and research in distinctive, powerful, and multidisciplinary ways across our curriculum, so we may equip our graduates to transform the lives of learners in the new century.

neXUs

at HGse, we believe that working at the nexus of practice, policy, and research is the most powerful way to improve education. This means that irrespective of your programs or fields of interest, or of the work and life experiences you bring with you to the Ed School, you will receive an education here that is guided in fundamental ways by cutting-edge research and deeply informed by a rich variety of interdisciplinary perspectives, current educational policies, contemporary pedagogical challenges, and educational philosophies.

You will live, learn, and collaborate within a community where practice-based researchers, research-based policymakers, and research-based practitioners routinely interact in innovative ways: to strengthen current teaching and learning practices by drawing on the latest research into human cognition; to link change leadership and management with improvement of instructional practice; and to improve student access to educational opportunities by analyzing the consequences of current education policies.

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Director of HGse’s Prevention science and Practice Program, Mandy savitz-romer has a passion for helping her students link research to practice in the field of school counseling. a lecturer on education, she brings extensive experience as a former urban counselor, director of enrichment programs in Boston Public schools, and current researcher on a variety of educational issues.

Working at the nexus
Our vision at HGSE is simple: to leverage partnerships with education stakeholders — from across disciplines and from around the globe — in profound and productive ways to ensure that every child may reach her or his potential as a learner. As a student at the Ed School, you will find working at the nexus of education practice, policy, and research to be an increasing part of our effort to achieve this goal. Examples of current projects and initiatives that exemplify our community’s commitment to working at the nexus include:

Practice-Based Research
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Conducting longitudinal studies of language and literacy skills among lowincome children, including the vocabulary of first- and second-language learners Investigating the development of flexibility in mathematical problem solving Exploring the relationships between the economy and education, teacher labor markets, determinants of children’s achievement, and strategies for making schools more effective

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Research-Based Policy Work
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Evaluating the politics of preK–12 education policy in the United States and the effectiveness of reform strategies in improving student achievement Studying the impact of federal policies on child development and health Informing policy changes to restructure the field of teaching, as well as teacher retention and compensation

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Research-Based Practice
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Seeking to help schools and districts use student assessment data to improve learning and teaching Creating and assessing learning environments based on modeling and visualization, online teacher professional development, wireless mobile devices, and multiuser virtual environments Incorporating the use of multiple intelligences theory to achieve more personalized curriculum, instruction, and pedagogy

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Professor of Practice Thomas Hehir testified before the U.S. House Committee on Education and Labor on legislation designed to expand and replicate successful charter schools to serve additional students, particularly those from low-income backgrounds and those currently enrolled in schools with low graduation rates or in need of improvement.

extraordinary faculty
inspiration isn’t hard to find at HGSe.
You’ll find it in almost every professor you interact with, both within our own community and across the university. After all, our faculty includes nationally renowned authorities on every aspect, and in every field, of education. Imagine being able to learn and collaborate with such luminaries as Howard Gardner, whose multiple intelligences theory has transformed educational thinking around the world; Vanessa Fong, an anthropologist whose work is helping shed light on the long-term impact of China’s one-child policy; Jack Shonkoff, a medical doctor who attracts interest from lawmakers across the nation for his work on the effects of early stimulation on babies and infants; Thomas Kane, an economist whose research into the effectiveness of test scores as a measure of student achievement leads him to testify before the House-Senate conference committee charged with reconsidering the No Child Left Behind act; Sara Lawrence-Lightfoot, a sociologist who explores parent-teacher conferences as the stage for a complex playing-out of major societal and cultural issues which shape the socialization and learning of children in our society … the list goes on and on.

teachers and mentors, colleagues and friends
Few institutions offer you as much opportunity to interact with distinguished, nationally recognized authorities in their fields than HGSE. As a student here, you’ll get to know them as inspiring teachers, as colleagues eager for you to collaborate with them on their own research programs and policy initiatives, and as mentors who encourage and guide you as you prepare to impact the world. For more on our extraordinary faculty, visit: www.gse.harvard.edu/faculty_research.

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bridget terry long/ Professor of education and economics
“The transition from high school to college is among the most important factors determining An advocate of publicpolicy changes to restructure education, Katherine Boles spent 25 years as a classroom teacher. “We have an amazing opportunity right now. Everyone my age is retiring. The potential of shifting teaching so these younger people come into something that they are willing to stay in for longer is there,” Boles says. “Policymakers need to realize and take seriously the truth that the most important resource in education is a high-quality teacher.” Katherine C. Boles Senior Lecturer on Education Director, Learning and Teaching Program Professor of education Hirokazu Yoshikawa is a developmental and community psychologist whose current work examines how public policies, parental employment, and transnational contexts influence very young children’s development in Chinese, Mexican, Dominican, and african american families. in addition to teaching and mentoring students at the ed school, he regularly advises government agencies, foundations, and educational and nongovernmental organizations in the United states and abroad. positive outcomes for individuals and their families, and whether it’s examining the effects of financial aid programs on this transition or the impact of postsecondary remediation on degree completion, HGSE allows me to straddle multiple worlds, from education and economics to government and policy,” explains Professor Bridget Terry Long. “Here, I’m surrounded by an extraordinary community of students and faculty passionate about addressing the same issues of inequality that I am, and who believe in finding solutions through strong, heavily-applied, cutting-edge research that works in collaboration with schools, districts, nonprofits, and other stakeholders.” As an economist specializing in education, Long exemplifies the extraordinary ability of HGSE faculty to infuse interdisciplinary insight, innovation, and inspiration into their work both within and beyond the classroom. Not surprisingly — from being recognized as a “Rising Star” in the Academy by Black Issues in Higher Education to being selected by The Chronicle of Higher Education as one of 11 scholars in a feature titled “New Voices: A Look at the New Generation of Higher-Education Thinkers” — Long’s contribution toward better understanding issues related to college access and choice has not gone unnoticed either by her students or by her peers.

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Faculty

www.gse.harvard.edu/directory/faculty
ilona Holland, Lecturer. Curriculum development, technology in education, evaluation. James Honan, Senior Lecturer. Higher education administration, financial management, professional development for educators. Vicki Jacobs, Lecturer. Teacher education, teaching of English. Deborah Jewell-sherman, Senior Lecturer. Urban superintendency, school principalship. susan Moore Johnson, Professor. Effects of education policy on schools, teacher career, teacher quality. stephanie Jones, Assistant Professor. Evaluation of school-based interventions, poverty and children, social-emotional learning and development. Matthew Jukes, Associate Professor. Health and education in developing countries. Thomas Kane, Professor. Education policy, program evaluation, economics of education. robert Kegan, Professor. Adult education, adult development, leadership. James Kim, Assistant Professor. Education policy, evaluation, middle school literacy. Josephine Kim, Lecturer. At-risk youth, counseling and clinical psychology, immigration. Daniel Koretz, Professor. Educational assessment as a tool of education policy. sara lawrence-lightfoot, Professor. Sociology of education, culture and schools. Holly lem, Lecturer. At-risk children and adolescents, counseling, child development. nonie lesaux, Associate Professor. Reading development, bilingual education, learning disorders. Meira levinson, Associate Professor. Civic education, curriculum development, multicultural education, political theory. richard light, Professor. Assessment, higher education curriculum, policy analysis and evaluation. Bridget Terry long, Professor. Economics of higher education, higher education policy. Vivian shuh Ming louie, Associate Professor. Immigrants and education, culture and identity. Gigi luk, Assistant Professor. Language development, bilingual education, cognitive neuroscience. Karen Mapp, Lecturer. Educational leadership, school and community partnerships. Pamela Mason, Lecturer. Reading comprehension, literacy learning for diverse student populations, school literacy programs. Katherine Masyn, Assistant Professor. Quantitative research methods. Kathleen McCartney, Professor and Dean. Public policy and child development, parenting and day care, poverty and children. eileen McGowan, Lecturer. Mentoring relationships in educational settings. Judith Block Mclaughlin, Senior Lecturer. Higher education leadership and governance. Jal Mehta, Assistant Professor. Education policy and politics, accountability, education reform. Katherine Merseth, Senior Lecturer. Teacher education, professional development for educators, math education. Mark Moore, Professor. Public management and leadership, community mobilization. richard Murnane, Professor. Teacher labor markets, education and the economy, quantitative research methods. Thomas Payzant, Professor of Practice. Urban education, achievement gap, systemic school reform. Fernando reimers, Professor. Reform of education policy and practice in developing countries. Julie reuben, Professor. History of American education. s. Paul reville, Senior Lecturer. School reform, state education policy analysis and evaluation, educational equity and standards. Melinda savitz-romer, Lecturer. School counseling, college access and retention for urban students. robert schwartz, Professor of Practice. Education policy, politics of school structure and governance, school reform. steven seidel, Lecturer. Arts in education, assessment, curriculum development. robert selman, Professor. Adolescence, child development, at-risk youth. Jack shonkoff, Professor. Intersection of science, policy, and practice related to the developing child. Judith singer, Professor. Quantitative research methods. Catherine snow, Professor. Bilingual education, cognitive development, early childhood development, language development. Jon star, Associate Professor. Math education, teacher education, cognitive development. lee Teitel, Lecturer. School structure and governance, school leadership, professional development for educators. Jennifer Thomson, Assistant Professor. Language development, learning disorders, neuroscience, reading development. shari Tishman, Lecturer. Arts in education, learning in museums, curriculum development. Terrence Tivnan, Lecturer. Quantitative research methods. Paola Uccelli, Assistant Professor. Language and literacy development, reading comprehension, English language learners. natasha Warikoo, Assistant Professor. Immigration, race, youth cultures. Mark Warren, Associate Professor. Diversity, educational equity, politics of school structure and governance. richard Weissbourd, Lecturer. At-risk youth, family issues, moral development. Martin West, Assistant Professor. Education policy and politics, education reform. John Willett, Professor. Quantitative research methods. Martha stone Wiske, Lecturer. Teaching and curriculum, technology in education. Hirokazu Yoshikawa, Professor. Public policy and child development, immigration and education, communities and schools. Jacqueline Zeller, Lecturer. Prevention and intervention, resiliency in children, professional development of teachers and counselors.

Felipe Barrera-osorio, Assistant Professor. International education policy, quantitative research methods. Joseph Blatt, Senior Lecturer. Educational media, technology and schools, science education. Katherine Boles, Senior Lecturer. Professional development for educators, teacher careers. Christopher Dede, Professor. Technology in education, science education. David Deming, Assistant Professor. Educational equity, economics of education, quantitative research methods. John Diamond, Associate Professor. Sociology of education, educational equity, urban schooling. eleanor Duckworth, Professor. Cognitive development, curriculum development, alternative schooling. Catherine elgin, Professor. Philosophy of education, language, science, and art. richard elmore, Professor. Effects of education policy on schools and classrooms. ronald Ferguson, Senior Lecturer. Education policy, achievement gap. Kurt Fischer, Professor. Cognitive development, the brain and education. Vanessa Fong, Associate Professor. China’s one-child policy, ethnography, immigration and education. Howard Gardner, Professor. Cognitive development, intelligence, neuroscience. Hunter Gehlbach, Assistant Professor. Adolescence, cognitive development, social perspective-taking. Tina Grotzer, Associate Professor. Cognition and instruction, science education, curriculum development. Paul Harris, Professor. Early childhood development, cognitive development, emotional development. Thomas Hehir, Professor of Practice. School leadership, learning disorders, special education. Monica Higgins, Professor. Leadership development and organizational change. Heather Hill, Associate Professor. Measurement of instruction, mathematics instruction, education policy. nancy Hill, Professor. Parenting and socialization practices, family dynamics and student performance. andrew Ho, Assistant Professor. Educational assessment and measurement.

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a Sampling of current collaborations
A flexible curriculum and a friendly, collegial learning environment ensure that both students and faculty at HGSE find many opportunities to collaborate — in both formal and Professor Robert Kegan believes that educational leaders will need to change themselves in order to bring about the school- and districtlevel changes necessary to prepare K–12 students for the global knowledge economy. “It’s going to require something more than uploading new skills, just as students need more than mere training,” he says. “It’s going to require that everyone in a school system — children and adults, as well — be supported to keep growing and developing.” This assessment is based on over 30 years of teaching, researching, writing, and consulting about adult learning and development. Robert Kegan William and Miriam Meehan Professor in Adult Learning and Professional Development
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informal ways — with colleagues within and beyond Harvard University. In addition to opportunities to crossregister for courses offered by other schools, students may also take advantage of numerous formally established projects, centers, and other initiatives, including:
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The Public education leadership Project, a collaboration with the Harvard Business School that strives to identify effective leadership and management practices to support large-scale organizational change in urban school districts that strengthens teaching and learning. The achievement Gap initiative, a collaboration with the Harvard Kennedy School that brings together scholars, nationwide, to produce and disseminate research aimed at improving performance for all children while narrowing racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic achievement gaps. The strategic education research Partnership, a coalition of school districts, universities, and local communities that develops, tests, and mobilizes effective programs and practices to address problems of student achievement.

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Harvard university facts
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Established: 1636 Motto: Veritas (Latin for “Truth”) Faculty: Approximately 2,100 faculty members and more than 10,000 academic appointments in affiliated teaching hospitals Schools and colleges: 10 principal academic units and the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study Library collection: Approximately 16 million volumes

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living the Harvard university advantage
a life of the mind
As a student at HGSE, you’ll live and learn at Harvard University’s headquarters for education enterprise. But what does it really mean to be a student at a university that has long understood the central role of education in creating vibrant economies, caring communities, and productive, ethical, and global citizens? It means being part of a community like no other. From world-class programs and facilities to the world’s largest library system, from a premier faculty conducting cutting-edge research to an alumni network that includes leaders from every field and in every walk of life, here you will connect to people, ideas, possibilities, and a rich tapestry of viewpoints, interests, backgrounds, experiences, and creative talents that truly transform your life. Everywhere, every day, you will discover a fierce sense of urgency about the life of the mind. A curiosity about the world. A desire to get at the root of complex ideas, to discover new interests, to develop new talents. And, above all, a deep commitment to making an impact on the world in profound ways.

a Student life experience of endless Possibilities
While academics always take priority, HGSE encourages students to fully participate in the social life of the university. Interact with visiting speakers who include educators, politicians, authors, scientists, and artists of national and international repute. Recent guests have included His Holiness the Dalai Lama; Bill Gates, Microsoft chairman and co-chair of the Gates Foundation; Arne Duncan, U.S. Secretary of Education; Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg; Yo-Yo Ma, Silk Road Project founder/artistic director and acclaimed cellist; Eric Carle, awardwinning children’s author and illustrator; and Wendy Kopp, chief executive officer and founder of Teach For America. Volunteer for community service initiatives organized by the Office of Student Affairs. Attend a Harvard-Yale football game. As an Ed School student, you will find an abundance of extracurricular opportunities and an experience alive with unlimited possibilities when it comes to having fun; developing intellectual, cultural, and professional interests; and forging lifelong friendships with some of the smartest and brightest minds in the world.

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ed.D. student anjali adukia’s research in development economics is geared toward providing children in rural india with increased access to education. as part of her fieldwork, she conducted interviews at more than 100 primary schools.

an amazing adventure
As you’d expect from a school ranked among the best in the field, graduate study at HGSE is exceptionally rigorous. Our master’s program combines traditional coursework, field placements, project-based learning activities, case discussion, onsite school consultations, cohort activities, and job placement services into a single year of excitement and intensity. But talk to our graduates and they’ll tell you that the academic experience we offer is also a life-defining adventure — one that will not only transform your future as an educator, but also empower you to impact your field, and the world around you, in meaningful and lasting ways.

From creating an original curriculum for a school-wide counseling program targeted at low-income first-generation students to assisting high school seniors in preparing college admission applications, sara Kratzok, ed.M.’10, made a significant impact at the Prospect Hill academy Charter school, a nationally recognized public school in somerville, Mass.

the World is Your classroom
Intense debates. Illuminating discussions. The fascinating perspectives of classmates from an uncommon array of work settings, professional fields, and cultural backgrounds. Revolutionary insights into every aspect, every dimension of the world of education — from student assessment to the achievement gap, from urban education to the projected, nationwide teacher shortages. One-on-one conversations with faculty who are as passionate about teaching and mentoring you as they are about their own research and publications. You’ll find your classes at HGSE to be highly engaging, friendly, and supportive environments that give you the knowledge and the confidence you need to channel your passion for education in ways that result in creative solutions to real and critical problems.

after inspiring troubled new York City teens to remain in school and teaching in Thailand as a Fulbright scholar, Chike aguh, ed.M.’10, became an education and Policy Management student upon realizing that “our education system needs a radical reinvention if all students are to compete on the global economic stage.” Chike gained invaluable experience as an intern at the Massachusetts executive office of education that focuses on improving student achievement, closing persistent achievement gaps, and creating a 21st century public education system.

beyond campus
But that’s not all. Your HGSE education is also likely to extend far beyond the classroom and our campus. You may analyze retention rates for a local afterschool science program for girls, for example. Or help shape education policy at the mayor’s office in Boston. Or work with artists and writers from the television show Sesame Street, originally developed in collaboration with our faculty and students. Or teach middle schoolers within economically disadvantaged, rural communities across the nation. While internships are not a requirement, more than 50 percent of our students find internships before they graduate. From the resources, databases, and connections provided by the Ed School’s Field Experience Program (FEP), to the large number of opportunities to be found across Harvard University, to the extensive possibilities offered by Boston’s schools, colleges, public agencies, museums, private corporations, and nonprofit organizations, our students discover many exciting ways to put their theoretical knowledge to the test, to develop a comprehensive set of practical skills and qualifications, to forge invaluable career networks and professional relationships, and to begin to impact the world even before they graduate.

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In addition to everything from the telephone to the sewing machine, paper money to the public library, Boston is also the birthplace of American public education. The city’s tradition of innovation and education continues to this day. The Boston Public Schools — the nation’s oldest public school system — earned the prestigious Broad Prize for its innovative reform efforts to increase student achievement. And Boston and its surrounding communities are home to more than 60 acclaimed colleges and universities.

an exceptional location
An Extraordinary Community
Radiating intellectual vitality and exuberance, the city of Cambridge is an ideal location for the extraordinary community of thinkers, doers, and dreamers you will meet as an HGSE student. You’ll be surrounded by people who value education (70 percent of bachelor’s degree or higher). Whether you are interested in history, art, music, theater, or science, opportunities to partake in all are within reach — either by walking (this is a tremendous place to walk) or by rail, bus, subway, or boat. The Harvard Square area, for example, is rated among the highest in the U.S. for density of bookstores per square mile. The Square is also brimming with restaurants, coffee and tea shops, sidewalk cafes, and other places to continue stimulating conversations. The opportunities for recreation and fun are numerous — from running along the Charles River, to enjoying street performers, musicians, and wine tastings; to attending such events as the famous Cambridge Science Festival, featuring lectures, debates, exhibitions, concerts, plays, and workshops.

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Cambridge residents 25 or older have a

What to do in boston?
As a student at HGSE, you’ll discover ample opportunity to take in all that the Cambridge/ Boston area has to offer. Here are a few places to visit, once you’re settled in:
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Freedom Trail: one of the nation’s first walking tours; provides an introduction to Colonial and Revolutionary Boston Fenway Park: home of the Boston Red Sox and the oldest ballpark in the Major League Faneuil Hall Marketplace: adjacent to the historic Faneuil Hall, these converted 18th century warehouses house boutiques, eateries, pushcart vendors, and street performers Museums: The Museum of Fine Arts, Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, Children’s Museum, Museum of Science, Museum of African American History, Museum of Natural History, and Peabody Essex Museum Boston Common: the starting point for the Freedom Trail and one of the nation’s oldest parks; serves as anchor for the Emerald Necklace, a system of parks that wind through such Boston neighborhoods as the charming Back Bay Harbor islands: swim, boat, tour the 34 islands, hike, fish, and bird-watch at this national park Theater District: Opera House, Colonial Theatre, Wilbur Theatre, Shubert Theatre, and the Citi Performing Arts Center. Outside the district: The Huntington, The American Repertory Theatre, The Lyric Stage, The Calderwood Pavilion, and the Emerson Majestic Theatre Chinatown: The third largest Chinese neighborhood in the nation; famous for its many excellent restaurants Cambridge Multicultural arts Center: experience world diversity through the visual and performing arts in programs presented to the community Black Heritage Trail: a walking tour through the largest area of pre-Civil War black-owned buildings in the nation

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A City of Opportunity
Boston, the seat of American history, is located just across the Charles River and is known as one of the most livable cities in the country. You’ll benefit from vibrant and diverse neighborhoods, exceptional medical facilities, and dynamic business districts, parks, community centers, and libraries. Boston hosts more than 12 million visitors from all over the world, drawn by the area’s educational institutions, history, arts, culture, and national sports

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teams. Greater Boston is home to Red Sox baseball, New England Patriots football, Celtics basketball, and Bruins hockey. The Boston Marathon, held each April, is the world’s oldest annual marathon and attracts approximately 20,000 runners from around the world.

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It was discovering China’s tremendous need for quality early childhood education on a 2001 visit that led Morgan Huang to his goal of creating an effective early education program there. After his undergraduate studies, Morgan arrived at the Ed School, where he found, “the methods and materials to formulate the foundation of my education philosophy.” His search for “angel investors” for the Morgan Rothschild Academy — the Chinese/ English preschool in Shanghai established and managed by him — began shortly thereafter. “I came to HGSE to prepare to achieve my dream of establishing my own school,” says Huang. “I left with a treasure that I will never exhaust.”
Morgan Huang Ed.M.’04

after Harvard
How far Will You Go after HGSe?
How will your future unfold? That depends on you, your dreams about tomorrow, and how you seek to impact the lives of others around you. As a graduate of the Ed School, you will quickly discover that the scale and scope of your professional achievements are limited only by your imagination. From the theoretical knowledge and practical skills necessary to inspire learners at all levels; to the comprehensive understanding needed to bring about deep, systemic changes to contemporary learning and teaching strategies; to the essentials of leadership education, our students find everything they need to pioneer their own pathway to transforming the world.

mary Helen immordino-Yang, ed.m.’98, ed.d.’05, applied to HGSE’s Mind, Brain, and Education Program when she realized, while teaching seventh graders, that what really fascinated her was the relationship between language and cognition in her students. And the first few weeks of classes were enough to convince her to pursue her doctoral studies here as well. But Immordino-Yang never imagined that her research into how social emotions shape and reflect brain development across cultures would have the power to impact education globally. Or that she would, 10 years later, receive the first “Transforming Education through Neuroscience” award from the Learning and the Brain Conference and the International Mind, Brain, and Education Society. Today, ImmordinoYang works as an assistant professor at the University of Southern California, building upon the work she began at the Ed School. “I definitely use my qualitative and quantitative skills from HGSE,” she says, “as well as the constructivist, contextualized approach to understanding neurological, socio-emotional, and psychological dimensions of learning.”

every day, in every Walk of life, You’ll find our Graduates making a difference.
Pushing the frontiers of the world of education. Innovating, inspiring, and improving student opportunity, achievement, and success. Preparing communities to face the educational challenges of tomorrow. You’ll find them making a difference in classrooms and boardrooms; in small community schools; at the largest schools, colleges, and universities in the world; in afterschool programs; within community organizations; in high-tech companies; within international organizations; and in the hallways of Congress. In fact, over 25,000 HGSE graduates continue to make an impact in the world — as national and international educational leaders, practitioners, researchers, and policymakers.

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Why education?
Why do our programs attract students from every professional and academic background? Because few fields offer you more meaningful opportunities to shape minds and transform people’s lives than education. And few schools empower you to make a more powerful, more immediate impact on the world than HGSE. Recent HGSE graduates have launched meaningful and rewarding careers in a variety of fields, including academia, adult education, art, business, counseling, curriculum development, educational technology, higher education administration, human services, international development/relations, preK–12 teaching, preK–12 administration, media, nonprofit administration, public relations/communications, and research/evaluation.

education licensure
Consider these facts. Currently, only about 70 percent of U.S. students graduate from high school. Given the challenges in attracting, supporting, and retaining high quality educators, in addition to the changing student demographics in this decade alone, U.S. schools will need to hire over 2 million new education professionals. HGSE enjoys a global reputation for transforming students and educators into leaders, so they may, in turn, transform education the world over. Not surprisingly, our graduates are in high demand within organizations both in the public and the private sector.
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As a community committed to improving the human condition by confronting and resolving the educational challenges facing us today, HGSE offers students a variety of programs, resources, and services to assist them in becoming licensed educators in the state of Massachusetts, as well as in other states across the nation. HGSE students may pursue licensure in the following programs:
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More than 3,700 employers, including schools, nonprofits, government agencies, consulting firms, social service providers, and media developers, actively pursue our students every year. Through on-campus events and job fairs, approximately 200 companies regularly visit our campus to interest students in, and inform them about, opportunities in such fields as technology, government, media, healthcare, education, and consulting.

teacher education (Teaching & Curriculum or MidCareer Math and Science): Middle/High School Teacher language and literacy: Reading Specialist Prevention Science and Practice: School Guidance Counselor/School Adjustment Counselor School leadership: Principal

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For answers to your licensure questions, please visit: www.gse.harvard.edu/licensure.

In addition to HGSE’s relationships with research centers, private and public organizations and institutions, and school districts around the world, one of the most valuable benefits we offer is access to our global alumni network of leaders and educators. The Crimson Compass — an online career advising service available to our students and alumni — connects you to more than 17,000 Harvard graduates from across the nation and around the world committed to helping one another explore professional interests and career alternatives.

molly Shaw, ed.m.’08, came to HGSE after serving as a fundraiser for her alma mater, Davidson College. She planned to study higher education administration, yet found herself drawn more and more to higher education policy. She realized that colleges and universities must work closely with the K–12 systems that feed them. After HGSE, she landed what she describes as her dream job as the Planning Director of the Charlotte Teachers Institute, a K–16 partnership among the Charlotte public school system, UNC Charlotte, and Davidson College. Public school teachers turn to the institute for professional development opportunities. “I am thrilled to blend my interests in education with my commitment to three outstanding institutions and the greater Charlotte community. HGSE helped me identify my passion for educational policy.”

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career Planning
Through faculty mentoring, collaborative research projects, practical teaching experiences, internships, student cohort group activities, and alumni connections, our students think about, and plan for, successful careers through every stage of their education here. Further, through the comprehensive array of orientations, workshops, information sessions, job postings, and small group advising offered by our Career Services Office, they are able to build individual career strategies to fully realize their leadership potential. The Career Services Office organizes a number of events throughout the academic year, including:
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entrepreneur
Deborah Bial, ed.M.’96, ed.D.’04 Deborah Bial is founder of the Posse Foundation, which has provided more than $265 million in scholarships to more than 2,600 promising high school students in seven major urban areas. At the Ed School, Bial used a $1.9 million grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to fund her doctoral dissertation work and to co-develop the Bial Dale Adaptability Index, which predicts college achievement for students who might not score well on standardized tests. Bial also received a $500,000 MacArthur Genius Grant in 2007.

Career Days: Scheduled during spring break and hosted by alumni in their places of employment in such major cities as New York City and Washington, D.C., Career Days provides students an opportunity to connect and converse with industry leaders within a variety of education organizations — nonprofits, for-profits, media, policy, research, and international PreK–12 schools expo: An on-campus event where visiting public, charter, and private schools engage with students and alumni directly, in a more informal setting than offered by information sessions and scheduled interviews social impact expo: An on-campus event during which visiting nonprofit, media, international, consulting, and policy firms interact with students and alumni in an informal setting MerC education Career Fair: HGSE’s Career Services Office, as a member of the Massachusetts Educational Recruitment Consortium, enables our students and alumni to take advantage of this off-campus event — held during public school spring break — which brings together a nationwide selection of public, charter, and private school systems with licensed and license-eligible job seekers in a range of educational fields internship expo: Scheduled during orientation week, this event offers students and employers a convenient way to meet and find mutually beneficial internship opportunities for the upcoming academic year

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What will your
economist
emiliana Vegas, ed.M.’96, ed.D.’01 When Emiliana Vegas, a senior education economist for The World Bank’s Human Development Department, was asked to advise top Chilean government officials after a student protest, she turned to her Ed School colleagues for help. “Improving teachers is a key lever for improving student outcomes,” she says. “We developed a way to look at education quality assurance systems and how government systems are arranged to ensure quality, to make sure that all standards are met and that all kids are learning.”

a Sampling of recent internship Sites
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Associated Early Care and Education Boston Arts Academy Brookline/Greater Boston Community Center for the Arts Buckingham, Browne, and Nichols School Charlestown Working Theater Citizen Schools Community Charter School of Cambridge DeCordova Museum and Sculpture Park Education Development Center, Inc. Eduventures Facing History and Ourselves Gabrieli Lab, Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

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Graham and Parks Alternative School Harvard University
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King Open Extended Day School Match Charter Public School Monument High School (Boston Public Schools) Museum of Fine Arts Primary Source Progressive Asset Management Project for School Innovation RedKey Education, LLC Science Club for Girls Step Into Art, Inc. Teachers21 The Steppingstone Foundation Tom Snyder Productions Tufts University WGBH Young Audiences of Massachusetts

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Harvard Business School Harvard Family Research Project Harvard Green Campus Initiative Harvard University Art Museums (HUAM) Harvard University Bridge to Learning and Literacy Program Harvard University Lab for Developmental Studies Harvard University, Center for Workplace Development Harvard University, Office of Work/Life Resources HGSE Development and Alumni Relations Office HGSE Office of Student Affairs HGSE Project Zero HGSE WIDE World

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Jobs for the Future

Teacher leader
Jason Kamras, ed.M.’00 Doubling time for math instruction is just one of the changes Kamras made at the Washington, D.C. middle school where he taught. The result? A dramatic improvement of his students’ performance on the math portion of the Standard 9, a biannual achievement test given in the D.C. public schools. In 2005, Kamras was named the 55th National Teacher of the Year. Today, he serves as director of human capital strategy for teachers in the D.C. public schools.

Harvard Graduate School of education Programs
The Harvard Graduate School of Education offers degree programs that not only place you at the nexus of practice, policy, and research as a student, but also prepare you to impact the world as educators and leaders — however you choose to improve education and the world.

master of education (ed.m.)
These yearlong programs offer uncommon theoretical, practical, and professional experiences, culminating in a degree that will open doors to numerous opportunities within the field of education and beyond.
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Arts in Education Education Policy and Management Higher Education Human Development and Psychology International Education Policy Language and Literacy Learning and Teaching Mind, Brain, and Education Prevention Science and Practice/C.A.S. School Leadership Special Studies Teacher Education Technology, Innovation, and Education

impact be?
Community organizer
Geoffrey Canada, ed.M.’75 For Geoffrey Canada, president and chief executive officer of the Harlem Children’s Zone (HCZ), reforming education in his community has been informed both by HGSE and his own troubled upbringing in a South Bronx tenement. The New York Times Magazine called HCZ “one of the most ambitious social experiments of our time.” Canada has earned a lengthy list of awards and honors that speak to the success of the program and the improved lives of the children who share his disadvantaged beginnings.

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doctor of education leadership (ed.l.d.)
In 2009, HGSE launched this innovative practice-based degree aimed at developing leaders who will transform the American preK–12 education system.

doctor of education (ed.d.)
In addition, HGSE offers a rigorous research-based program to prepare scholars and leaders to have broad impact in policy and practice. Students focus their studies on one of five concentrations:
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Culture, Communities, and Education Education Policy, Leadership, and Instructional Practice Higher Education Human Development and Education Quantitative Policy Analysis in Education

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arts in education (ed.m.)
Description
Students in the yearlong Arts in Education (AIE) Program explore the multiple roles for the arts in education — from nurturing the creativity of individuals to the creation of healthy schools, communities, and a more civil society. Through the study of arts learning and the challenges of implementing arts education broadly, students expand and deepen their understanding of this evolving field. AIE embraces all serious efforts to support the arts and artistic learning, both in and out of schools.

Frequently asked Questions
What is the program’s class profile? Your classmates will bring a rich variety of experiences to the AIE cohort. Many come to the program as accomplished playwrights, musicians, dancers, actors, and other artists, as well as teachers and administrators, whose bond is a passion for improving arts education. Some are seasoned practitioners in education who want to incorporate the arts into their practice. Others use their AIE experience to prepare for new careers as program directors, outreach managers, administrators, teachers, or other active contributors to arts education. What do graduates of this program do? AIE graduates go on to influence the world in broad and varied ways — through museum education, research, teaching, administration, arts program development, and in other ways that are as diverse as the arts themselves. recent aie graduates serve in such positions as:
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Education specialist, Museum of the Royal Baths, Warsaw, Poland Visual arts teacher, International School of Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia Theater arts teacher, public high school, Harlem, N.Y. Art professor, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Mass. Staff director, municipal public arts program, Boston Curator of education, university art museum, Durham, N.C.

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Why HGse?
Learning at the intersection of practice, policy, and research, you will draw on the finest thinking from all three of these aspects of arts education, gaining insights that only a school with the reach and reputation of the Harvard Graduate School of Education can offer. And, from collaborating with nationally renowned faculty members to interacting with visiting national and international artists, researchers, and educators, you’ll find inspiration, opportunities, and connections that will help you have an impact on the practices and possibilities — even the purposes — for the arts in schools, communities, and other learning environments.

For more information, please visit the ed school’s Career services office or online at www.gse.harvard.edu/careers.

Contact information
admissions liaison: Natalie Van Kleef e-mail: asknatalie@gse.harvard.edu faculty director: Steve Seidel Program coordinator: Scott Ruescher mailing address: Arts in Education Program Harvard Graduate School of Education 13 Appian Way, 300 Longfellow Hall Cambridge, MA 02138 Web address: www.gse.harvard.edu/aie

Arts education specialist, National Endowment for the Arts, Washington, D.C. English teacher, alternative public high school program, Minneapolis, Minn. Director of programming, in-school nonprofit arts education organization, Los Angeles Director of research and evaluation, nonprofit school organization, San Francisco Assistant professor of arts education, education school, Toronto Curriculum planning officer, Ministry of Education, Singapore

internship sites for recent aie students include:
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Museum of Fine Arts, Boston VSA Massachusetts (state organization on arts and disability), Boston

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Young Audiences of Massachusetts, Somerville, Mass. ZUMIx Community Music Center, Boston
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Why Harvard?
Tapping into the extraordinary resources of Harvard University, you will be able to select courses not only from the Ed School, but also from the Harvard Business School, Harvard Kennedy School, Harvard Graduate School of Design, and Harvard Law School. In the Boston area, you will have access to renowned arts organizations, innovative preK–12 schools, and government and nonprofit agencies for internships and career opportunities. And, both in and beyond the Boston area, you will have access to our close-knit network of alumni. Whether your goal is to advance your career in the field or to change career direction, AIE program faculty and the Ed School’s Career Services Office will work with you to find your place among the recent students who have built successful careers across the nation and around the globe — as arts education program coordinator at Americans for the Arts in Washington, D.C.; education curator at the Dallas Museum of Art; project officer at the Singapore Ministry of Education; and executive director of Inside Out Community Arts in Los Angeles, for example.

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This year at HGSE has been life-changing. I’ve taught in the Bronx; created and implemented a curriculum on Cuban music; participated in developing an arts education program for New York City’s public schools with renowned cellist Yo-Yo Ma; and, through Harvard’s Office for the Arts, explored my own research interest in how to make the arts more central within university curricula.
Eric Oberstein

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for more on how our students, faculty, and alumni are impacting the world, visit: www.gse.harvard.edu/impact.

Exactly why does a professional saxophone and drum player who has worked as assistant producer on Grammy Award-winning artist Arturo O’ Farrill’s Risa Negra (ranked among the top jazz albums of 2009 by the Wall Street Journal) choose to attend the AIE Program? “I think my road to HGSE probably began when, as an undergraduate student, I was mentored by a truly amazing professor who helped me discover my passion both for Cuban music, as well as for nonprofit arts management,” says Eric Oberstein, the son of a Cuban exile. Subsequently, Eric spent several years composing original jazz pieces; attending Duke, Columbia University’s business school, and Teachers College; and working, among other organizations, with Jazz at Lincoln Center, the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, and finally, the Afro Latin Jazz Orchestra led by Farrill. But then he became involved in Creative Campus, an initiative sponsored by American Assembly, a national, nonpartisan public affairs forum. “Soon, I grew deeply interested in the role of the arts in higher education settings. And given my ultimate goal of running a nonprofit arts organization, whether in a university or in a public setting, I thought what better complement to my arts management training than the AIE Program? “The sense of possibility HGSE evokes in you is truly incredible,” continues Eric. “I’ve discovered a unique program and a uniquely warm culture; amazing, and amazingly accessible, faculty; extraordinary classmates, from teaching artists, to classroom teachers, to arts administrators; and a community and a campus that allow you to interact with leaders in their fields every single day.”
eric oberstein Bellerose Village, new York ed.M., arts in education

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education Policy and management (ed.m.)
Description
The Education Policy and Management (EPM) Program is designed to prepare graduates to assume challenging policy and management positions in a variety of governmental, intermediary, nonprofit, school, and other educational organizations. This yearlong program introduces students to the world of policy and the intergovernmental systems that provide “public education” in the United States. EPM students grapple with the strengths and weaknesses of policy as a tool for school improvement. They delve into contemporary policy and management issues utilizing research skills and evidence, political analysis, and organizational knowledge.

Frequently asked Questions
What is the program’s class profile? Students come to the EPM Program from a broad range of backgrounds. Some are veteran practitioners in policymaking and management looking for ways to be more effective. Others are preparing to embark on new careers in education-related roles and want to begin with the fullest understanding of how their efforts can best improve the lives of children. All share a dedication to the ideals of social justice and a desire to effect a more equitable environment by working within the existing system or endeavoring to change it. What do graduates of this program do? EPM graduates learn about the potential power and proper application of policy to set high expectations, spur innovative practice, advance student learning, and provide incentives and models to inspire continuous educational improvement. They work in federal, state, and local government; national foundations; advocacy organizations; professional associations; policy think tanks; school improvement organizations; and local schools and districts. recent ePm graduates serve in such positions as: ■■ Director of external relations for public school system, Chicago
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Director of planning & operations, national charter school organization, Houston Site manager, new teacher training program, Miami Richard G. Polanco Fellow, California Latino Legislative Caucus Institute, California Senior project manager for state policy development and advocacy, Jobs for the Future, Boston Presidential liaison for special initiatives and governmental relations, The Cleveland Foundation, Ohio National program director, After-School All-Stars, California

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Why HGse?
In addition to learning from and working with a faculty comprising some of the foremost thinkers, scholars, and practitioners in the field, exceptional handson experiences at the Ed School will complement your academic experience for an education rich with practical knowledge and meaning. Recently, for instance, a student spent the year interning at the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education working with the charter school accountability team, enabling her to go on site visits and utilize school data. Meanwhile, another student worked at The Achievement Network through the Field Experience Program, where she helped build the online Coaching Hub to share materials, codify practices, and train new staff.

For more information, please visit the Ed School’s Career Services Office or online at www.gse.harvard.edu/careers.

Contact information
admissions liaison: Natalie Van Kleef e-mail: asknatalie@gse.harvard.edu faculty director: Karen Mapp Program coordinator: Omolola Irele mailing address: Education Policy and Management Program Harvard Graduate School of Education Gutman Library, 4th Floor Cambridge, MA 02138 Web address: www.gse.harvard.edu/epm

internship sites for recent ePM students include:
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Associate director, The College Board, New York Co-founder/co-principal, Success Preparatory Academy, New Orleans Legislative correspondent, senator’s office, Washington, D.C.

Boston Public Schools Center for Law and Education, Boston Codman Academy Charter School, Dorchester, Mass. Commonwealth Corporation, Boston Education Development Center, Inc., Newton, Mass. Massachusetts 2020 Foundation, Boston Massachusetts Business Alliance for Education, Boston Massachusetts Teachers Association, Boston Rennie Center for Education Research and Policy, Cambridge, Mass.

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Why Harvard?
Whether you are an experienced educator, education activist, or a fresh college graduate seeking an exciting and impactful career in education, Harvard University can open doors to a whole world of exciting new opportunities to help shape the policies and practices that ultimately impact schools and the lives of learners across the nation and beyond. Here, you’ll find incomparable opportunities to expand your understanding of policy and management through courses at the other schools, such as the Harvard Kennedy School, Harvard Business School, and Harvard Law School, among others. As a graduate, you may also take advantage, both of the resources offered through the Career Services Office, as well as the professional connections of the global alumni network.

I wanted a flexible program that prepared me to create better educational programs and opportunities for low-income youth by offering me access both to nationally recognized faculty, policymakers, and practitioners, and to the professional insights of talented classmates across every aspect of education. I heard about HGSE’s EPM Program from a friend and it has been everything I wanted and more.
Preeya Pandya

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t for more on how our students, faculty, and alumni are impacting the world, visit: www.gse.harvard.edu/impact.

It wasn’t until a freshman volunteer experience tutoring African American youth at an afterschool center in Chicago’s South Side that Preeya Pandya discovered her passion for education. “My goal until then was to specialize in international relations and join the United Nations,” explains Preeya. “But that experience was a real awakening — it made me aware that the opportunities I’d taken for granted throughout my own public school education were simply unavailable to so many. And that while I cared deeply about global issues, I was even more passionate about addressing one of the most urgent problems we face right here at home.” Since then, Preeya has taught and developed curricula for children from low-income rural communities through Teach For America. She has implemented interactive lessons, through the Project HOPE afterschool program, to help prevent alcohol and drug use and violence among middle schoolers in Palmetto, La. And, having relocated to Boston, she currently works as a teacher-counselor for the Cambridge Housing Authority’s Work Force Program. “I feel very fortunate to be here,” Preeya admits. “This program, this community, and my professors and classmates here have been a revelation. I was becoming increasingly interested in how school-community partnerships could impact students and address achievement gap issues and the opportunities I’ve found here to explore these interests have been incredible. Every day, I’m able to apply what I learn here to how I teach and develop curricula for 13–18-year-old low-income students living in public housing.”
Preeya Pandya rochester, new York ed.M., education Policy and Management

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Higher education (ed.m.)
Description
The Higher Education Program (HEP) is designed for students interested in working as college and university administrators or in roles in policy and planning at an educational association or agency. During their time at HGSE, students learn how to effectively navigate the political, cultural, and structural terrain of colleges and universities. They explore the historical origins and contemporary dimensions of critical issues in higher education and develop the leadership, analytical, and management skills necessary for future success.

Frequently asked Questions
What is the program’s class profile? HEP students bring remarkably diverse academic, professional, and life experiences into the classroom. They come from such backgrounds as academic and student services, government and nonprofit organizations, faculty positions, policy design, and leadership. Once here, they form exceptionally close ties, finding a variety of ways to support each other and share newfound insights in their discipline. Creative, intelligent, and enthusiastic, they are quick to capitalize on opportunities to take their learning beyond the Harvard campus and into the larger community. What do graduates of this program do? The Higher Education Program offers ideal preparation for a variety of careers. Graduates go on to assume roles of increasing leadership and influence in such fields as student affairs, academic affairs, enrollment management, institutional research, finance and planning, institutional advancement, and policy analysis. recent HeP graduates serve in such positions as:
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College counselor, charter school, Boston Dean of undergraduate admissions, private university, Pasadena, Calif. Institutional research analyst, private university, New York Assistant dean for academic advising, public university, San Diego Director of freshman programming, private university, Cambridge, Mass. Director of policy and research, higher education association, Boston Assistant director, Office of Global Affairs, private university, Waltham, Mass.

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Why HGse?
At the Ed School, you will engage in an intense year of study alongside outstanding students and world-class faculty. The Higher Education Program is known for its strong cohort identity and active alumni network. The innovative “president-in-residence” program brings a former college president to Harvard each year to attend classes, meet with you over coffee or lunch, and advise on everything from course assignments to career choices. As a complement to coursework, most students pursue custom-designed, paid internships. The HEP faculty director and program coordinator will help match you with an internship that provides professional development in your chosen area or allows you to test possible new career interests. In addition, you have the opportunity to interact with faculty whose work extends far beyond the classroom. HEP faculty advise state and federal policy leaders; consult with leaders of colleges and universities, schools, and not-for-profit organizations; serve on boards of trustees; and are active in national associations. At HGSE, you’ll find exceptional support from faculty and staff who make sure you’re making the most of your time here.

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For more information, please visit the Ed School’s Career Services Office or online at www.gse.harvard.edu/careers.

Contact information
admissions liaison: Shirley Greene e-mail: askshirley@gse.harvard.edu faculty director: Judith McLaughlin Program coordinator: Caron Yee mailing address: Higher Education Program Harvard Graduate School of Education Gutman Library, 4th Floor Cambridge, MA 02138 Web address: www.gse.harvard.edu/highered

Director of student affairs, public university, Berkeley, California Manager of precollegiate programs, State Commission of Higher Education, Colorado Director of assessment and strategic planning, public university, Washington

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Why Harvard?
With a Harvard education, you’re well positioned for success. Faculty from the Harvard Business School, Harvard Kennedy School, and Harvard Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, among others, lend their expertise as teachers, advisers, and mentors to HGSE students. And you certainly will want to take advantage of Harvard’s vast network of alumni connections for career conversations and job connections. HEP graduates stay in touch with each other and with the program, and serve as an extraordinary resource to students.

I arrived at HGSE with what I now realize was an extremely narrow view of higher education. By opening my mind to new insights and different points of view, this program has given me a deep, as well as an exceptionally broad, view of the field. I feel prepared to impact higher education in significant ways, regardless of the type of position I pursue.
Lauren Contreras

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for more on how our students, faculty, and alumni are impacting the world, visit: www.gse.harvard.edu/impact.

“My mom and three of my aunts are teachers, so the last thing I thought I’d become was an educator,” admits Lauren Contreras. But as a top-ranked student at a large Dallas high school, Lauren soon began to observe that counselors seemed only to have the resources to focus on their very best students. And as a freshman at a small, private liberal arts college in Austin, Texas, she couldn’t help but notice that many of her high school peers — most, from minority communities — did not go on to college. Not surprisingly, upon graduation, Lauren found herself working with the AmeriCorps Service as part of a program focused on helping low-income and first-generation students gain access to college. “But I was soon full of questions,” Lauren says. “Why were so many being denied the kind of college experience I’d enjoyed? How do you build better partnerships with universities? I realized that to make a real difference, I needed to learn more about the intricacies of how higher education actually worked … both the theoretical and historical issues, as well as the real impact of these issues on real students. “It still feels like a dream to have been accepted into this program — whether it’s the quality of my professors and classmates and their experiences as practitioners, researchers, and policymakers or simply the incredible access to internships, professional opportunities, and resources. Where else can you attend a class on the economics of higher education by [Professor] Bridget Terry Long; another on education leadership by [Senior Lecturer] Judith McLaughlin, who has served as chair of the Massachusetts Public Education Nominating Council; and round it all off with a talk on policy by Secretary of Education Arne Duncan?”
lauren Contreras Dallas, Texas ed.M., Higher education

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Human development and Psychology (ed.m.)
Description
The Human Development and Psychology (HDP) Program enables students to explore the cognitive, emotional, communicative, and relational development of the individual from birth through adulthood. Through a strong emphasis on applied research, this yearlong program seeks to bridge traditional divisions between academic disciplines, building on developmental thinking and incorporating an understanding of diversity.

Frequently asked Questions
What is the program’s class profile? From new college graduates who seek a rigorous and intensive master’s program, to experienced educators seeking to connect their own work to the latest research findings, the HDP Program attracts students from a broad range of backgrounds. Some students enter with an undergraduate degree in psychology. Others have degrees that range from business to literature and have developed their interest in human development and psychology through their work with children, personal experience, or independent research. What they all share, however, is a passion for education; a keen interest in combining theory and research on child, adolescent, and adult development; and a deep desire to impact the world by reflecting and acting upon potential applications to education. can i get my teacher certification or counseling licensure through the HdP Program? The HDP Program does not offer licensure. Individuals interested in licensure are encouraged to consider the Prevention Science and Practice/Certificate of Advanced Study in Counseling Program. Details for this program may be found on page 40. Please also consult the licensure information found on page 21. What do graduates of this program do? Many work for a broad range of organizations where they address a variety of developmental and psychological issues that affect learners. They begin or expand careers in public health, social services, child advocacy, and social policy, among many other areas. Some graduates go on to doctoral programs in education, in developmental psychology, or clinical psychology. Others work in research-related settings.

recent HdP graduates currently serve in such positions as:
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Program coordinator, parenting/family nonprofit, California Associate director, early childhood nonprofit, Boston Research associate, policy organization, Washington, D.C. Dean of students, independent school, Fort Lauderdale, Fla. Education program manager, nonprofit, Westport, Conn. Associate director of admissions, private K–12 school, Chicago Lead teacher, university children’s center, Boston Producer, public television, Boston

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Why HGse?
Some of the best educational research in the world is happening at HGSE. From Professor Paul Harris’ work on children and imagination to Associate Professor Vivian Louie’s research on immigration, you will be pushed to challenge your assumptions and deepen your understanding. In addition to courses that expose you to the latest ideas and research, some students choose to participate in the Ed School’s Field Experience Program. These internships enable you to observe and assess human development and psychology in real-world settings. You may also use this opportunity to assess potential careers and determine if they match your specific interests and goals.

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For more information, please visit the ed school’s Career services office or online at www.gse.harvard.edu/careers.

Contact information
admissions liaison: Shirley Greene e-mail: askshirley@gse.harvard.edu faculty director: Richard Weissbourd Program coordinator: Mary Kiesling mailing address: Human Development and Psychology Program Harvard Graduate School of Education 14 Appian Way, Larsen Hall 515 Cambridge, MA 02138 Web address: www.gse.harvard.edu/hdp

internship sites for recent HDP students include:
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Center for Child and Adolescent Development, Medford, Mass. Center on Media and Child Health, Children’s Hospital Boston Codman Academy Charter School, Dorchester, Mass. Disability Rights Fund, Boston Education Development Center, Inc., Newton, Mass. Harvard University
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Center for Public Interest Careers Center for Workplace Development International Negotiation Initiative, Harvard Law School Lab for Developmental Studies Museum of Natural History

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WGBH, Boston

Why Harvard?
Because HDP is one of the longest running programs at the Ed School, you will benefit from its distinguished history within Harvard University. The work of HGSE faculty in studying human development and psychology for approximately 90 years has added tremendously to the knowledge of these fields. This shows in the HDP curriculum. You will find a range of courses, particularly in the areas of cultural, social, cognitive, and language development. In addition, you can take courses offered by nationally renowned faculty at the other graduate schools, such as the Harvard Kennedy School and the Harvard Business School. And once you graduate, you will discover that your Harvard degree opens doors to some of the most exciting and rewarding careers in the world of education.

The faculty is truly amazing — as teachers, as scholars and practitioners, and as mentors. Also, one of the best things about the HDP Program is that it’s flexible. You have freedom to pursue a customized course load to explore exactly what you are passionate about in ways that are specifically relevant to you.
Laura Greer

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for more on how our students, faculty, and alumni are impacting the world, visit: www.gse.harvard.edu/impact.

“I guess I’ve always been interested in human nature, in connecting with people and with their stories,” says Laura Greer, reflectively, when asked about her interest in the HDP Program. “It’s one reason why I majored in history as an undergraduate. But I also always knew, even as a five-year-old, that my life would involve teaching in some way, shape, or form. So it was really exciting to find an opportunity with Teach For America after graduation. “Teaching kindergarten for two years within low-income communities — first in Phoenix and then in my hometown of Miami — was a transformative experience. I saw that, although the students were capable of learning at the highest levels, their behavior and social emotional skills were preventing them from achieving. I soon realized that what I really wanted to do was not just teach my students, but create a classroom that enabled them to develop both academically and emotionally. “I became really passionate about early childhood education, because I felt that if we could get the foundation right in their initial years, we’d be setting students on the path to success. I looked at several different programs, but HDP was unique. It was interdisciplinary in that it covered every aspect of child development and psychology, but it was also flexible in allowing you to pursue your own interests in the context of all these offerings. Plus, I knew of HGSE’s reputation for blending research, theory, and practice. And, given the incredible faculty mentoring and opportunities I’ve discovered at HGSE, I know that, soon, I’ll be doing exactly what I want to do — lead an outstanding school for low-income students in Miami.”
laura Greer Miami, Florida ed.M., Human Development and Psychology

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international education Policy (ed.m.)
Description
The International Education Policy (IEP) Program provides students the knowledge, perspective, and experience to lead global education reform efforts that empower low-income and marginalized children and improve equity through education. Graduates are recognized for their deep understanding of important education problems; solid knowledge of the field of international education, policy, and development; strong analytical training; well-developed communication skills; and a commitment to social justice. Over the course of the yearlong program, students study the field of international and comparative education, while developing policy analysis and research skills to improve education systems and implement and manage programs.

Frequently asked Questions
What is the program’s class profile? Students come to IEP having earned degrees in a range of subjects, from political science, psychology, international relations, and history, to anthropology and physics. Professionally, they have held positions such as research analyst, Peace Corps volunteer, elementary school teacher, operations analyst, World Bank staffer, and director of institutional development, in industries ranging from government and nonprofits to public and private education and research. What do graduates of this program do? Graduates of IEP bring innovative change to learners, and lives, around the world. Combining their previous academic, professional, multicultural, and life experiences with the knowledge, skills, field experiences, faculty and alumni connections, and career opportunities offered by the Ed School, our graduates go on to serve as education-focused leaders in development organizations, government, consulting firms, research, and nongovernmental organizations. What drives them is the desire to achieve the ideal of education and make it available to all as a basic human right. You’ll find recent ieP graduates serving in such roles as:
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Academic dean/history teacher, School for Ethics and Global Leadership Education support coordinator, Innovations for Poverty Action Program manager, International City/County Management Authority, Washington, D.C. Program analyst, U.S. Agency for International Development Education specialist, UNESCO

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Why HGse?
As an IEP student, your education will focus on how policy decisions affect the accessibility and quality of classroom instruction, always with the end recipient — the learner — in mind. In addition to offering you access to a distinguished faculty of renowned scholars and practitioners, the program also holds regular seminars to introduce you to some of the field’s leading practitioners. Further, the Field Experience Program enables you to find internships and gain real-world experience even before you graduate. So you may effectively incorporate empirical evidence in the analysis of policies and policy alternatives as you seek to improve the relevance, quality, effectiveness, efficiency, and equity of education systems worldwide. Even before you begin your formal IEP studies, you can immerse yourself in the program’s methodologies, review basic skills, delve into cases, and bond with others in your cohort by taking the Ed School’s three-week, noncredit summer course called the Intensive Preparation for the Study of International Education (IPSIE).

For more information, please visit the Ed School’s Career Services Office or online at www.gse.harvard.edu/careers.

Contact information
admissions liaison: Gregg Glover e-mail: askgregg@gse.harvard.edu faculty director: Fernando Reimers Program coordinator: Omolola Irele mailing address: International Education Policy Program Harvard Graduate School of Education Gutman Library, 4th Floor Cambridge, MA 02138 Web address: www.gse.harvard.edu/iep

Consultant, World Bank Consultant, Inter American Development Bank

internship sites for recent ieP students include:
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Ministry of Education, Jamaica Room to Read, California Save the Children, Westport, Conn. Small Bean, Massachusetts UNICEF, Switzerland World Education, Massachusetts World Teach, Cambridge, Mass.

I’ve learned from respected scholars; attended seminars at other Harvard schools; and had a whole team of faculty mentors from across the Business School, the Kennedy School, and HGSE help me create a proposal to impact education in Chile. The best part of this program is that I feel prepared to enable change both at the macro level and at the micro level.
Paula Cruzat

Why Harvard?
You will find extensive opportunities to enrich your IEP education at Harvard University. Choose courses offered by nationally renowned faculty at the other graduate schools, such as the Harvard Business School and the Harvard Kennedy School. Enlarge your understanding of specific cultures by participating in the many seminars, lectures, and other activities at such Harvard area studies centers as the David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies, the Asia Center, the Minda de Gunzburg Center for European Studies, the Center for Middle Eastern Studies, and the Committee on African Studies. And connect to the opportunities offered by our influential, close-knit, and global network of alumni.

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for more on how our students, faculty, and alumni are impacting the world, visit: www.gse.harvard.edu/impact.

For Paula Cruzat, it was a startling statistic: 40 percent of the low-income children in her home country of Chile were unable to read in the fourth grade. “I had spent 10 successful years in engineering and management positions within the private sector,” says Paula, “but nothing had prepared me for the absolute shock I felt. The more I thought about it, the more determined I grew to do something about it. Because, to me, education is more than a pedagogic issue; it’s a basic right and it’s society’s collective responsibility to ensure that everyone has that right.” Soon, as deputy director of education in a district in Santiago, Paula was working closely with the mayor to make a difference. “But, as I got to meet families, parents, teachers, and students, I discovered the enormous disconnect between policymakers and the reality of what was happening in schools. And I realized that, in order to make a real impact, I needed to know more, much more, about the world of education. “But I didn’t want to apply to just any program. If I were going to put my career on hold, I wanted it to be worth it. I wanted one that was rigorous, flexible, and applied; one that would truly empower me, but allow me to return quickly to my development work and my goal of helping connect policy better to the day-to-day reality in Chile. And most of all, I wanted a school that could not only open doors for me by connecting me to the best researchers, practitioners, and policymakers in the field, but one where everyone shared my passion for education and social change. Well, HGSE’s IEP Program has been all that and so much more.”
Paula Cruzat santiago, Chile ed.M., international education Policy

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language and literacy (ed.m.)
Description
Combining the field’s best theories and research with practical experiences in educational settings, the Language and Literacy (L&L) Program enables students to explore, understand, and impact the ways in which children (preK–12) learn language in all its forms. The program takes the broad view that literacy benefits the individual, but ultimately society, in a variety of ways. L&L students gain a wide perspective on literacy development, including the role of English language learning, sociocultural influences, and ethnic backgrounds. They study literacy through the lenses of policy and practice, and through research that deepens knowledge of the discipline to the level of neuroscience, all with an emphasis on how students can use the knowledge to become a force for positive change in education.

Frequently asked Questions
What is the program’s class profile? L&L students come to the program with degrees in subjects as wide-ranging as English literature, elementary education, child development, history, sociology, and linguistics. Professionally, members of the cohort have been lead reading teachers, ESL instructors, speech-language specialists, foreign language instructors, marketing associates, and classroom teachers. Their prior employment represents industries such as public and private schools, higher education, and the business sector. They also bring a passion for literacy as one of society’s most powerful and transforming elements. Ambitious and focused, L&L students enter the program with a variety of goals, including beginning a new career, enhancing an existing one, or continuing on to doctoral study. can i get state licensure through the l&l Program? Yes. If you have completed an initial or professional teaching license and have at least one year of classroom experience as a preK–12 teacher, you can take courses and exams that can qualify you for Massachusetts licensure as a reading specialist teacher. What do graduates of this program do? They help give children and adults the key to unlock the written world by applying a comprehensive understanding of the field’s theory and research to individual lives. L&L graduates work in diverse settings, including public and private schools, educational publishing, adult literacy programs, hospitals, and research organizations.

recent l&l graduates currently serve in such positions as:
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Associate editor, educational publishing, Boston Literacy coach, Boston ESL teacher, Taiwan Assistant director, peer services, private university, Boston Reading specialist, San Diego Senior curriculum associate, nonprofit organization, New Haven, Conn.

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For more information, please visit the Ed School’s Career Services Office or online at www.gse.harvard.edu/careers.

Why HGse?
In addition to learning from and collaborating with a faculty of leading authorities in the field, students enjoy access to the considerable resources of the Ed School’s Jeanne Chall Reading Lab, where they may conduct research, as well as train as a reading specialist or literacy coach by working with mentors in local schools. As part of the L&L curriculum, you may choose classes that fall into the broad categories of research, practice, and policy, representing an interdisciplinary course of studies. Further, as a Reading Specialist licensure student, you will take two practicum courses that will give you the chance to gain valuable practical experience tutoring and teaching in a local public school. As a Literacy Coach student, you will do a Field Experience Program internship working closely with a coach in a local public school. Other internships for students in the generalist strand have included working at the WGBH Educational Foundation on educational materials to accompany Martha Speaks and Between the Lions. You can also conduct research through the Ed School’s research group, Project Zero, as well as at the Jeanne Chall Reading Lab.

Contact information
admissions liaison: Natalie Van Kleef e-mail: asknatalie@gse.harvard.edu faculty director: Pamela Mason Program coordinator: Kera Street mailing address: Language and Literacy Program Harvard Graduate School of Education 14 Appian Way, Larsen Hall 321 Cambridge, MA 02138 Web address: www.gse.harvard.edu/langlit

Why Harvard?
In addition to taking advantage of the rich resources and abundant academic and professional opportunities offered by Harvard University, you may also choose to take courses offered by the other graduate schools. Explore language, for instance, at the Harvard Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. Or enrich your understanding of government policymaking through a course at the Harvard Kennedy School. Your Harvard education will prepare you for a rewarding career in literacy, and it will provide you with incomparable professional connections through faculty, members of your cohort, alumni, and field experiences.

Maybe it’s because of the people I’ve met here; perhaps it’s simply the strong sense of community; but for me, the most exciting part has not only been to learn exactly how language and literacy works (the science behind how language is acquired, for example), but also the bridges I’ve built across research, policy, practice, and with people from amazingly diverse backgrounds and life experiences.
Noah Mackert

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t for more on how our students, faculty, and alumni are impacting the world, visit: www.gse.harvard.edu/impact.

It was his undergraduate volunteering experiences at a prison, as well as teaching English to Mexican immigrants, that led Noah Mackert to one of his most significant “aha” moments: “The realization that education truly is the civil rights issue of our time.” Having spent the next six years working with such organizations as Teach For America (working with students with learning and emotional disabilities in the Bronx, N.Y., and even writing about his experiences in a New York Times column), Noah soon “discovered that being an educator was fulfilling in a way nothing else was. Soon, I was looking for schools where people were as passionate about it as I had become. And here I am. “HGSE often talks about its own mission in terms of developing leaders who can empower students everywhere,” continues Noah. “Well, I think this school does an incredible job of empowering its own students. The powerful connections created between scholarship and policy to all levels of practice, as well as the sheer caliber of teaching is what attracted me to this program and this school. I feel extremely well-prepared to return to the classroom as the kind of instructional leader who can also take on policy or legal roles whenever necessary. “Not surprisingly, the opportunities I’ve discovered here have been amazing. My field experience component has me currently teaching at a Catholic high school in the South End. I’ve been able to take a fascinating course at the Kennedy School, attend talks by global leaders in their fields almost every day, and explore Boston, its rich history; the city is such a great laboratory of ideas for anyone passionate about large-scale educational reform.”
noah Mackert rice, Minnesota ed.M., language and literacy

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learning and teaching (ed.m.)
Description
The yearlong Learning and Teaching (L&T) Program offers two distinct strands, general and instructional leadership, that serve students from a variety of backgrounds who wish to explore fundamental learning theories, best practices, and enduring issues in the field of learning and teaching. General Strand The flexible nature and interdisciplinary approach of the General Strand encourages students to develop a customized program of study. Students are required to take eight courses, five of which are selected from an extensive list that includes curriculum development; new technologies; the history and philosophy of education; learning theory; classroom culture; adult learning; the arts; and the impact of race, class, gender, and identity on education. instructional leadership Strand The Instructional Leadership (IL) Strand is designed for individuals who have taught in preK–12 schools for at least three years. The carefully constructed curriculum focuses on four specific areas — curriculum; instruction; leadership, organization, and politics; and practice — to prepare teachers to assume new leadership roles, both formal and informal, within schools. Such roles include content coach, data analyst, peer evaluator, teacher researcher, induction coordinator, technology specialist, professional developer, department chair, or curriculum developer. For more information about the IL Strand, please visit: www.gse.harvard.edu/lt/instructional_leadership.html.

Frequently asked Questions
What is the program’s class profile? Dedicated to making a difference to learners, our students represent a wide range of backgrounds, from early- or mid-career education professionals to those beginning new careers. They come from across the U.S. and the world, and offer a variety of learning and teaching perspectives. Furthermore, the L&T program supports teaching and learning in multiple contexts. For example, environmental educators and medical professionals have been able to improve their work as a result of the knowledge and skills acquired in the program. can i get a teaching license through the l&t Program? The L&T Program does not lead to certification or licensure. For more information about programs that offer licensure, please turn to page 21. What do graduates of this program do? L&T graduates gain the diverse skills that allow them to join the private and public sectors as teachers, tutors, mentors, advisors, research associates, curriculum developers, and educational specialists in settings such as the sciences, museums, community-based programs, and environmental education. recent l&t graduates currently serve in such positions as:
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Director of strategic operations, national educational think tank Teacher team leader, public middle school, Boston Professional development specialist, public schools, Washington, D.C. Teacher union president, public school, Cambridge, Mass. Assistant principal and teacher, elementary school, Bangkok, Thailand Research biologist, National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration, California

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For more information, please visit the Ed School’s Career Services Office or online at www.gse.harvard.edu/careers.

Contact information
admissions liaison: Gregg Glover e-mail: askgregg@gse.harvard.edu faculty director: Katherine Boles Program coordinator: Rilda Kissel mailing address: Learning and Teaching Program Harvard Graduate School of Education 13 Appian Way, 326 Longfellow Hall Cambridge, MA 02138 Web address: www.gse.harvard.edu/lt

Why HGse?
As a student at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, you have the opportunity to study in classes taught by some of the nation’s leading scholars and practitioners in the field of education. Moreover, you may choose to participate in the Field Experience Program as part of your academic work. This experiential learning program enables you to gain practical work experience while exploring new career paths and professional networks.

Curriculum specialist, private secondary school, Seattle

internship sites of recent l&T students include:
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Public and independent schools Prominent charter schools Education Development Center, Inc., Newton, Mass. Project Zero, Harvard Graduate School of Education New England Aquarium, Boston

This program is about so much more than brilliant and supportive professors and classmates brought together by their shared passion for education. It’s about understanding every single aspect of how to translate that passion into making a real and visible difference in the lives of learners, regardless of whether it is as a teacher, a curriculum advisor, a mentor, or a school leader.
Paviter Singh

Why Harvard?
From its vast resources and facilities to a vibrant intellectual community to the unparalleled achievements and accomplishments of its faculty and alumni, Harvard University offers a broad, exciting, and transforming educational experience. As a graduate student, for example, you will have the chance to take courses in any Harvard graduate school, including the Harvard Kennedy School, the Harvard Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, the Harvard Business School, and the Harvard Law School.

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t for more on how our students, faculty, and alumni are impacting the world, visit: www.gse.harvard.edu/impact.

He still recalls his first day as a teacher. “It was surreal, like a scene from a movie,” chuckles Paviter Singh. “The Ministry of Education had assigned me to a school in one of the roughest and poorest neighborhoods in Singapore. I spent the entire day just trying to get my students to stop flinging paper missiles or chairs and tables around.” Eventually, Paviter decided to throw away the established curriculum and connect with students by incorporating everything from music lyrics to technology to their individual resumes in every class. The strategy worked and he was soon appointed to head the English department. “That was when I began to think about teaching and learning being, to quote Professor [Richard] Elmore at HGSE, much more about what students are actually doing rather than about what teachers ask them to do,” he says. Soon, after success at other schools and developing, along the way, an expertise in instructional technologies that enabled him to become Singapore’s first Apple Distinguished Educator (one of only 1,000 worldwide), Paviter found himself at HGSE, funded by a Fulbright award. “My goal is to return to head a school in Singapore,” continues Paviter. “But I was more interested in returning as an instructional leader, a teacher leader, and this program was perfect. What I’ve been most impressed by is the amazing faculty, being part of a community that lives and breathes passion for education, and by the incredible opportunities I’ve discovered here, from my current internship with a local nonprofit to such leadership opportunities outside the classroom as serving as vice president of the student government.”
Paviter singh singapore ed.M., learning and Teaching

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mind, brain, and education (ed.m.)
Description
The only one of its kind in the nation, the Mind, Brain, and Education (MBE) Program takes students on a yearlong scientific journey of how thinking happens within the complex structure of the brain, and then relates that understanding to issues of pedagogy. This intersection of biology and cognitive science with education is a new focus in the world of education and an emerging field that holds exciting possibilities for changing not only the way we teach, but also what we must consider in making educational or public policy. Because MBE is affiliated with Harvard’s Mind/Brain/Behavior Interfaculty Initiative, students will have the added advantage of a strong interdisciplinary course of study that explores the connections of cognitive neuroscience with anthropology, linguistics, computer science, philosophy, and other fields.

Frequently asked Questions
What is the program’s class profile? Students with a wide range of backgrounds, including the liberal arts, will join you in the MBE Program. Some will be experienced educators or researchers; others will have done undergraduate or professional work in psychology, cognitive science, brain science, child development, or philosophy. About half our students end up translating their MBE degree into meaningful and successful careers at a variety of academic and professional educational settings, while many others use the program to strengthen their backgrounds as they prepare for doctoral study. What do graduates of this program do? Many graduates return to the classroom and incorporate their knowledge of biology, cognitive science, and pedagogy into the curriculum. MBE graduates shape successful careers within research organizations, children’s and science museums, child intervention programs, children’s television programming, educationrelated publishing, or go on to doctoral study. You’ll find recent mbe graduates serving in such positions as:
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Marketing research associate, Korea Instructional designer, nonprofit R&D, Wakefield, Mass. Math specialist, state department of education, Boston Visiting Fulbright Scholar, Bristol, United Kingdom Curator of education for adult and family programming, art museum, Mobile, Ala. Educational content specialist, educational software company, Concord, Mass.

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For more information, please visit the Ed School’s Career Services Office or online at www.gse.harvard.edu/careers.

Contact information
admissions liaison: Shirley Greene e-mail: askshirley@gse.harvard.edu faculty director: Kurt Fischer Program coordinator: Mary Kiesling mailing address: Mind, Brain, and Education Program Harvard Graduate School of Education 14 Appian Way, Larsen Hall 515 Cambridge, MA 02138 Web address: www.gse.harvard.edu/mbe

Why HGse?
There’s no better choice for students whose passion for education relates to any or a combination of such topics as cognitive neuroscience, learning and instruction, cognitive development, emotional development, learning disabilities, uses of technology for education, and diversity in education. Your work as an MBE student at the Ed School will do more than inform you. It also will help create new knowledge and advance the progress of this young and developing field. You can participate in research projects with Ed School faculty who are leaders in the science of learning. These and other hands-on applications will transform your education by adding the crucial element of knowledge gained through real-world work experience. Many of our students emphasize the practical application of cognitive principles to pressing problems with the intention of promoting a reciprocal integration of research with practice.

Presidential management fellow, Washington, D.C. Learning specialist, private university, Camden, N.J. Research assistant, private university, Cambridge, Mass.

Why Harvard?
With its vast and broad array of resources, facilities, and faculties and its rich history of pioneering intellectual breakthroughs, Harvard University forms the perfect setting for an interdisciplinary program like MBE. Whether it is immersing yourself in educational issues related to government policymaking through a course at the Harvard Kennedy School or studying children’s brain chemistry at the Harvard Medical School, here you will find remarkable opportunities to expand your education by pursuing research and coursework with the other graduate schools. Further, you may also choose to supplement your Harvard education with courses at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. And, as a graduate, you will also gain the professional advantages and support of our close-knit, global alumni network.

There’s no program in the world that helps you understand the interdisciplinary connections between such fields as cognitive neuroscience, biology, linguistics, philosophy, and education, like the MBE Program does. And there’s no school that offers you a richer mix of opportunity, resources, incredible faculty and classmates, research, practical and leadership experiences, and understanding of policymaking than HGSE.
Ryan Masa

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for more on how our students, faculty, and alumni are impacting the world, visit: www.gse.harvard.edu/impact.

Growing up in a residential neighborhood of Cleveland, ryan Masa was always aware of the acute disparity between school districts. “But then I read Kozol’s Savage Inequalities: Children in America’s Schools, which ignited a sense of outrage, passion, and purpose in me,” says Ryan. Over the summers of 2003 and 2004, through two different organizations, Ryan found himself counseling children with cognitive and physical disabilities, as well as learners diagnosed with Severe Emotional Disturbances (SED). After adding a B.S. in education to his B.A. in history, he joined the Lawrence School in Ohio, rising up to become its Upper School codirector in a few transformative years. “Serving students ‘orphaned’ by the traditional educational system was life-changing. It taught me that labeling children as ‘disabled’ completely ignores their multitude of skills and talents. If a child’s unable to learn, it’s our instruction that is ‘disabled.’ Plus, Lawrence allowed me to interact with several brilliant HGSE graduates and such innovative educators as [Professor] Kurt Fischer. They’re why I’m here. They made me aware of the urgency of finding a graduate program that would specifically develop my cognitive skills in order to become a more effective leader for change. “I truly believe that ‘the future’s in the margins,’” concludes Ryan, borrowing a phrase from Lecturer David Rose, one of the numerous professors at HGSE to have deeply inspired and informed his thinking. “The students currently marginalized by the educational system are the ones who will drive the creation of new methodologies, curriculums, and policies of benefit to all students. To me, there’s no work more urgent, exhausting, or spiritually rewarding, than helping make this happen.”
ryan Masa Parma, ohio ed.M., Mind, Brain, and education

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Prevention Science and Practice (ed.m.)/certificate of advanced Study (c.a.S.) in counseling

Description
The yearlong Prevention Science and Practice (PSP) Program is designed to prepare students to make a lasting impact on children/adolescents and families, the contexts in which they live, and the institutions that shape their development. Through research and fieldwork, students study risk and protective influences on development at both the ecological and individual levels, as well as interventions to promote healthy social and emotional well-being. Using an interdisciplinary approach, students learn about contemporary prevention-related issues, direct services and counseling, applied research, and program and policy development. The program offers two paths of study: core Strand This strand trains students in prevention science and research in education, child and family advocacy, child/youth development, program development and leadership, and service coordination. It is intended for students who wish to apply prevention science and research to a variety of settings. counseling Strand This is an option for those students who may wish to pursue licensure. In addition to the concepts developed in the core strand, students will focus their courses and fieldwork in school-based preventative and developmental counseling. This strand may additionally be used as a foundation for a second year of HGSE graduate study toward a Certificate of Advanced Study (C.A.S.) in Counseling.

Frequently asked Questions
What is the program’s class profile? You’ll experience the master’s program with a cohort of colleagues who come from a variety of personal, academic, and professional backgrounds. Some students have recently earned their bachelor’s degree, while many others come with years of experience working as teachers, counselors, program developers, and researchers. Will the program prepare me to become a licensed school counselor/social worker? Graduates of the PSP Program are eligible to apply for the Certificate of Advanced Study (C.A.S.) in Counseling, which consists of two additional semesters of full-time coursework. The C.A.S. is specifically structured to meet either school guidance counselor or school adjustment/ school social worker licensure requirements. What do graduates of this program do? The program’s two strands prepare students for distinctive paths to careers and further study. Graduates accept positions in support services, nonprofit organizations, teaching, research, or policy that advance the social, emotional, and academic development of children and adolescents. The gainful employment disclosure for C.A.S. graduates can be found on the PSP website. recent PSP graduates serve in such positions as:
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Targeted student support specialist, District of Columbia Public Schools Program manager, Massachusetts Department of Youth Services, Boston Family services coordinator, Center for Families, City of Cambridge, Mass. Assistant professor in psychology, private university, Charlottesville, Va. Adjustment counselor, Medford Public Schools, Mass.

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For more information, please visit the ed school’s Career services office or online at www.gse.harvard.edu/careers.

Contact information
admissions liaison: Natalie Van Kleef e-mail: asknatalie@gse.harvard.edu faculty director: Mandy Savitz-Romer Program coordinator: Karen Bottari mailing address: Prevention Science and Practice Program Harvard Graduate School of Education 14 Appian Way, Larsen Hall 602 Cambridge, MA 02138 Web address: www.gse.harvard.edu/psp

Why HGse?
The PSP Program includes a yearlong practice or research experience that enables you to apply the knowledge and skills acquired through interdisciplinary coursework. Our extensive network of partnerships with schools and community-based agencies provides invaluable opportunities for you to gain real-world experience in prevention education, intervention, counseling, and program development. Students with an interest in policy, program development and evaluation, educational research, or preparation for doctoral study may participate in the research experience with a PSP faculty member.

School counselor, Boston Public Schools Director, Posse Program

I know of no other program that focuses so directly on developing you into a leader who can prepare students for crises before they occur by immersing you in cutting-edge research based on practical, real-world issues, and in cutting-edge practices founded on such advanced research. And I doubt any program can match the sheer passion and quality of faculty here.
Jennifer Sohn

Why Harvard?
Harvard University, with its world-class faculties, facilities, and resources, offers students many additional benefits, both expected and unexpected. As part of our vibrant and diverse intellectual community, you will find many opportunities, for example, to cross-register for courses offered by various schools at the university, including the Harvard Law School, Harvard Kennedy School, Harvard School of Public Health, and Harvard Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. In addition, you will also enjoy access to a global alumni network that includes thinkers, scholars, practitioners, and leaders both in the world of education, as well as in health and human services.

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for more on how our students, faculty, and alumni are impacting the world, visit: www.gse.harvard.edu/impact.

From volunteering at teaching camps as a high school student on the West Coast to getting involved in a children’s community center as an English and cinema studies major on the East Coast, Jennifer sohn always knew she enjoyed teaching. But it was feeling utterly helpless while observing a national tragedy unfold that led her to discover her true calling in life. “Thanks to a Fulbright scholarship, I had just started working at a vocational high school in Taegu, South Korea, when the terrible shooting at Virginia Tech occurred,” explains Jennifer. “Television gave me the American perspective, but I also got the Korean perspective because of where I was. It left me heartbroken about the pressures Korean Americans faced as a ‘model’ minority and our socio-cultural taboos against discussing mental health issues. But it also made me decide to spend my life doing something about it.” Upon returning home, Jennifer found an exciting opportunity with the Broad Foundation, a nonprofit focused on urban K–12 public education. “I enjoyed helping students deal with the complex academic, social, and emotional challenges of urban learning. However, I soon realized that to make a real impact, I needed to know much more and develop other skill sets. I applied to several programs, but the Prevention Science and Practice program at HGSE was extremely attractive, particularly because of the blend of research and practice, the different areas of concentration, the internship opportunities, and the fact that you are placed in a practicum site in your very first week. I’ve found incredible opportunities here. And I’m surrounded by some of the brightest, friendliest, most inspiring people, teachers, and mentors I’ve ever met.”
Jennifer sohn Granada Hills, California ed.M., Prevention science and Practice

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School leadership (ed.m.)
Description
The School Leadership Program (SLP) uses an innovative leadership model to prepare students to assume dynamic roles leading transformative change in schools. It offers a coherent sequence of courses and practicum experiences that grounds students in the centrality of teaching and learning, and helps them understand and navigate the different structures and cultures of charter, pilot, and district schools, as well as the systems that support them. The program focuses on the levers of improvement — how school leaders create conditions in start-up schools or transform them in existing settings to support high-quality teaching and learning for all students. At the same time, the program is intensely personal, focusing on the leadership development of each participant — his or her sense of purpose and commitment, skills in working effectively with other adults, and courage in tackling one of the biggest challenges we face — providing the knowledge, skills, and social development our students need.

Frequently asked Questions
What is the program’s class profile? Most SLP students come with experience as administrators or educators in schools, nonprofits, and for-profit organizations and agencies. Four years of full-time teaching experience are required to enter the Principal Licensure Strand, while three years of experience in educational settings are required for the School Development Strand. Our graduates consistently and frequently report back from the field that the program has prepared them well for leadership. Will the School leadership Program prepare me for state licensure? All students take a strong common core of classes and enroll in a half-time practicum in a local district, pilot, or charter school. Those interested in obtaining Massachusetts licensure as a school principal enroll in the Principal Licensure Strand, while those who seek leadership roles that do not require licensure (for example, in charter schools) enroll in the School Development Strand. What do graduates of this program do? SLP graduates lead school-level improvement efforts at district, pilot, and charter schools as principals, directors, department heads, and curriculum coordinators.

recent SlP graduates serve in such positions as:
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Founder and principal, charter school, New York Principal, charter school, Los Angeles Curriculum planner and developer, charter school, Somerville, Mass. Principal, public elementary school, New York Principal, public international high school, Columbus, Ohio Founding president, Catholic high school, Houston Assistant principal, charter school, Denver

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For more information, please visit the Ed School’s Career Services Office or online at www.gse.harvard.edu/careers.

Contact information
admissions liaison: Julie Vultaggio e-mail: askjuliev@gse.harvard.edu faculty director: Lee Teitel Program coordinator: Caron Yee mailing address: School Leadership Program Harvard Graduate School of Education Gutman Library, 4th Floor Cambridge, MA 02138 Web address: www.gse.harvard.edu/slp

Why HGse?
The School Leadership Program enables students to develop expertise in curriculum, instruction, assessment, peer collaboration, organizational leadership, and learning, as well as in the tools and techniques of effective management. It incorporates extensive real-world learning experiences through a yearlong half-time practicum in a school focused on improving its outcomes for all students. All students begin their time at HGSE by registering for a summer session, consisting of leadership development and pre-practicum work.

Why Harvard?
As one of the world’s leading universities, Harvard has extensive academic and professional opportunities within its unique and diverse intellectual community led by a world-class faculty. As a student, you may hone your leadership knowledge with a course at the Harvard Kennedy School, the Harvard Law School, or the Harvard Business School. In fact, the SLP curriculum allows students to opt for courses from any school across campus. Finally, as a graduate, you will enjoy access to a powerful global network of faculty and alumni who passionately advocate for educational excellence.

As an SLP student, I’ve been able to view education leadership through multiple lenses. I’ve learned more than I ever thought I would; interacted with the best minds on every aspect of both education and leadership; found opportunities to apply my knowledge in real classrooms; and developed relationships across Harvard I know I can depend on throughout my career and life. Marcus Williams

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for more on how our students, faculty, and alumni are impacting the world, visit: www.gse.harvard.edu/impact.

“I still love hearing and telling stories, especially of people who’ve traditionally had difficulty getting their stories heard; I just happened to find that teaching was more challenging and infinitely more rewarding,” says Marcus Williams, a first-generation college student and Chicago native who began as a broadcast journalism major before switching to education. “But what I realized working with diverse student populations across various public and private schools was that you’ve got to develop big shoulders to learn and succeed in a city like Chicago and so many simply weren’t finding the opportunities to do so. And while I could see the impact I was making as an educator, I could also see that my contribution needed to be much bigger.” That’s when Marcus discovered the SLP’s Principal Licensure Strand designed to produce instructional leaders. “I never ever thought I’d get in, but I couldn’t help but apply,” grins Marcus. “Barack Obama had just become president. Everyone I knew was talking about hope. And here was an opportunity to spend a year at Harvard, learn from some of the world’s best educators, scholars, and policymakers, and bring all of that knowledge back home. “For me, SLP has been one incredible year of unbelievable learning, professional development, and leadership training. But the most important thing HGSE’s given me is self-confidence — the belief that I can not only dream of transformation in the lives of my students, but actually enable that change to occur in significant ways.”
Marcus Williams Chicago, illinois ed.M., school leadership

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Special Studies (ed.m.)
Description
The Special Studies Program (SSP) is the most flexible of all the Ed School programs, because students are able to design their own specialized, interdisciplinary course of study. In consultation with a faculty advisor, students choose eight courses that will move them closer to their professional and academic goals. While four are required to be courses offered by the Ed School and could include a field experience or independent study, students may complete the remaining four courses through a combination of electives at the Ed School or at other Harvard graduate schools.

Frequently asked Questions
What is the program’s class profile? SSP is ideal for students who have a specific career or educational plan in mind and want to pursue it in a highly individualized way. This is why, while they are all independent and innovative thinkers and focused, goaloriented learners, our students represent a range of diverse backgrounds and come to the program for a variety of different reasons. Recent students have come to HGSE with work experience earned in positions ranging from medical doctors, psychologists, and business consultants, to science teachers, researchers, and technology consultants. They hold degrees in subjects as varied as psychology, public administration, English literature, architecture, fine arts, and the classics. What do graduates of this program do? The customizable nature of the Special Studies Program allows students to prepare for an almost limitless variety of education-related careers. recent SSP graduates serve in such positions as:
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Managing director, private tutoring company, Cambridge, Mass. Consular officer, U.S. State Department, Washington, D.C. Program coordinator, national museum, Washington, D.C. Assistant coach, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.

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For more information, please visit the Ed School’s Career Services Office or online at www.gse.harvard.edu/careers.

Why HGse?
The flexibility of the Special Studies Program makes it an ideal choice for students who seek to acquire a broad and strong theoretical foundation to maximize the impact they can achieve or to develop the specific skills they need for success and leadership in education. As an SSP student, you will learn from, and work with, a wide range of faculty members who can offer advice and connections to help you achieve your unique academic or career objectives. You’ll take advantage of extraordinary Ed School resources such as the Career Services Office. Depending on your specific goals, you’ll also discover a large number of practicum and internship opportunities within schools, colleges, and education-focused companies and organizations within the greater Boston area through the Field Experience Program.

Contact information
admissions liaison: Julia Deland e-mail: askjulia@gse.harvard.edu faculty director: John Collins Program coordinator: Karen Bottari mailing address: Special Studies Program Harvard Graduate School of Education Gutman Library 102 Cambridge, MA 02138 Web address: www.gse.harvard.edu/special

Dean of students, private elementary school, Charlotte, N.C. Director, business school, Buenos Aires, Argentina Faculty, independent school, Baltimore Associate, research company, Boston

internship sites for recent ssP students include:
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Buckingham, Browne, & Nichols School, Cambridge, Mass. Appalachian Mountain Club Youth Opportunities Program, Boston CAST (Center for Applied Special Technology), Wakefield, Mass. Education Development Center, Inc., Newton, Mass. Massachusetts Audubon Society, Lincoln, Mass. RedKey Education LLC, Cambridge, Mass. Project Zero, Harvard Graduate School of Education Office of Work/Life, Harvard University

I came in with a great background in clinical research. What I’ve gained through this program is an expertise in social science research; in-depth knowledge of the field of education; a whole world of amazing new mentors, friends, ideas, and possibilities; and the ability to incorporate the best pedagogical methods into creating better surgeons and, ultimately, offering patients better medical care.
Gi Soo Lee

Why Harvard?
The SSP curriculum allows you to shape your own academic journey by choosing courses from across disciplines and schools campus-wide. And few universities offer a more extensive, more meaningful range of academic choices or access to world-renowned authorities in every area of study imaginable than Harvard University. Depending on your specific interests, you could take policy courses at the Harvard Kennedy School, study management at the Harvard Business School, or combine medicine and education with courses at the Harvard Medical School. Students may even opt for courses offered at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Best of all, as a graduate, you will also enjoy the professional benefits of being connected to a network of alumni that extends across the nation and around the globe.

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for more on how our students, faculty, and alumni are impacting the world, visit: www.gse.harvard.edu/impact.

For Gi soo lee, being admitted to the Special Studies Program was a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to keep a promise he’d made himself in another life. “I met some of the most influential teachers of my life as an undergraduate specializing in marine biology and promised myself to spend some time learning to teach, regardless of whatever else I did in life,” says the surgeon, who comes to HGSE through a clinical fellowship in pediatric medicine with the Children’s Hospital Boston. “Through all my years of medical school training in Minnesota and Seattle, I kept wondering: am I being taught the right way? Are there more effective ways of teaching and learning when it comes to a clinical education, especially in a world of medicine that’s changing rapidly and in significant ways? After all, my professors were teaching me the same way they’d been taught. And none of them had formal training in education or in dealing with widely differing learning styles.” It was the flexibility of the Special Studies Program, combined with the quality of faculty, course offerings, and classmates that drew Gi Soo to HGSE. “You can tailor this program so it specifically matches your own goals, whether it’s becoming an education leader in your field, gaining expertise in a specific niche of education, or applying the most cutting-edge pedagogical practices into your own alternate career. Just consider my classmates: they include a U.S. Marine and helicopter pilot who wants to revamp ROTC (Reserve Officers’ Training Corps) programs in colleges, an attorney who is also a full-time mom, even a Hollywood actor-screenwriter who wants to create new, more integrated ways of teaching acting!”
Gi soo lee edina, Minnesota ed.M., special studies

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teacher education (ed.m.)
Description
The Teacher Education Program (TEP) offers students world-class preparation to change the course of the lives of middle- and high-school aged adolescents. It is an ideal choice for those who seek to meet the unique challenges and opportunities of teaching in urban settings and strive to be leaders in creating systemic school changes that will inspire new levels of success in adolescent learners. The Ed School offers two 11- month options in Teacher Education: The MidCareer Math and Science (MCMS) Program is designed for students with undergraduate or graduate degrees in math or the sciences who have also had a minimum of five years of work experience in applied math- or science-related fields. The Teaching and Curriculum (TAC) Program is intended for students with undergraduate or graduate degrees in math, science, or the humanities who have a passion for the liberal arts and social justice.

Frequently asked Questions
What is the program’s class profile? TEP students represent a broad variety of academic and professional backgrounds — from those who have recently earned their undergraduate degrees, to those with substantial work experience in math- or sciencerelated fields, to others who are mid-career professionals from such diverse fields as scientific research, business, law, technology, the military, engineering, and medicine. Cohort members hold bachelor’s and/or master’s degrees in subjects such as biology, chemistry, physics, English, mathematics, computer science, economics, history, sociology, and political science. does the program lead to teacher licensure? Yes. With a passing score on the Massachusetts state licensure test and with the program’s endorsement, TEP candidates qualify for initial licensure at the middle- and highschool levels in biology, chemistry, earth science, general science, physics, English, history, political science/philosophy, and mathematics. Massachusetts licenses are reciprocal with approximately 46 other states. What do graduates of this program do? TEP graduates go on to make significant contributions in urban middle- and high-school classrooms across the nation.
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recent teP graduates serve in such positions as:
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Seventh-grade humanities teacher, charter school, Cambridge, Mass. Eighth-grade English language arts teacher, charter school, Boston High school social studies teacher, Denver Middle school math teacher, Atlanta High school English teacher, New York Upper school physics teacher, San Jose, Calif.

For more information, please visit the ed school’s Career services office or online at www.gse.harvard.edu/careers.

Contact information
admissions liaison: Shirley Greene e-mail: askshirley@gse.harvard.edu faculty director: Katherine Merseth Program coordinator: Susan Kandel mailing address: Teacher Education Program Harvard Graduate School of Education 13 Appian Way, 309 Longfellow Hall Cambridge, MA 02138 Web address: www.gse.harvard.edu/tep

Why HGse?
In addition to its faculty comprised of world-renowned scholars, policymakers, and practitioners, HGSE offers a number of additional benefits. TEP students begin their practical experience immediately during the summer following their acceptance into the program. Guided by a master teacher, they will spend mornings planning and team-teaching middle- and high-school students enrolled in the Cambridge-Harvard Summer Academy. They then will continue teaching throughout the fall and spring terms at a partnership school in Cambridge or Boston. Students attend biweekly advisory sessions, designed to enhance their internship experiences, by bridging theory and practice through exploration of and reflection on teaching and learning. In addition, they complete a yearlong portfolio project that supports their examination of the program’s overarching question, “What does it mean to be an effective teacher of urban youth?”

This program has given the knowledge, practical experiences, and mentors I needed to develop into an effective and influential educator in an urban classroom. But more importantly, it has provided me with the competence, confidence, and connections I need to be a leader.
Melissa Aguirre

Why Harvard?
As students at the Ed School, they enjoy access to all of the incredible intellectual and professional opportunities, choices, and resources offered by one of the world’s leading institutions of higher education. Imagine being able to enrich your education by collaborating with faculty in your specific field of interest or discovering new intellectual passions as you pursue electives offered at any of the other Harvard graduate schools. Best of all, as a TEP graduate, you become part of a dynamic, close-knit, and influential network of alumni who are passionate about making an impact in their classrooms and in the world of education.

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for more on how our students, faculty, and alumni are impacting the world, visit: www.gse.harvard.edu/impact.

“I’ve always been interested in education; in fact, I was particularly inspired by a service experience helping design HIV education workshops,” says Melissa Aguirre, the daughter of immigrants from Argentina and the Dominican Republic. “But I realized it was my life’s calling when, after graduating with a degree in Latin American studies and journalism and finding an exciting opportunity with a nonprofit, I became a guardian to my 14-year-old cousin who’d moved to New York from the Dominican Republic. She did not speak English, had language issues even with Spanish, and I had to help her navigate the New York City public school system. I still remember how overwhelmed I felt at the complete lack of good choices and options for learners like her in a major U.S. city.” Soon, Melissa had relocated to Philadelphia to work with a nonprofit specializing in providing afterschool services to young people from minority backgrounds. “That made me realize how much more I needed to learn in order to make a real impact. Soon, I was looking at several graduate programs. “But I wanted a program that would not only give me access to the most advanced scholarship and the best faculty mentors in education, but also place me at carefully chosen sites where I could apply my learning in intentional and powerful ways, and be flexible enough so I could focus on my goal of becoming an effective educator and mentor to students in urban classrooms. I was in shock when I learned I’d been admitted to this program. The course offerings, the people, the opportunities, and all the resources of Harvard — it’s been everything I wanted and much more.”
Melissa aguirre Queens, new York ed.M., Teacher education

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technology, innovation, and education (ed.m.)
Description
The Technology, Innovation, and Education (TIE) Program prepares students to excel in the design, implementation, and assessment of educational media and technology. TIE courses put learning and teaching at the center, with technology as the means, not the mission. The faculty combines internationally recognized researchers with industry-leading professionals. From social networking sites to smartphone software, in major media companies and start-ups, and throughout K–12, university, and informal learning environments, TIE graduates exercise creativity and leadership. The program prepares students to excel in the design, implementation, and assessment of educational media and technology. The yearlong program emphasizes three core areas:

Frequently asked Questions
What is the program’s class profile? TIE students come to HGSE from almost everywhere — from across the U.S. and many other countries, and from widely varied career backgrounds. The program attracts students from teaching and school administration, software design and educational publishing, and television production, management consulting, higher education, and research firms. Students also vary in their familiarity with technology, and the program has no specific technology requirements. What do graduates of this program do? TIE graduates launch rewarding and meaningful careers in virtually every area where technology supports learning, such as teaching and managing from preschools to universities, designing educational software, creating public and commercial television programs, developing museum exhibits, and conducting research and evaluation on new projects and products. recent tie graduates serve in such positions as:
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Manager, animation development, children’s television network, Los Angeles Software engineer, global computer company, Redmond, Wash. Medical simulation coordinator, teaching hospital, Boston

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For more information, please visit the ed school’s Career services office or online at www.gse.harvard.edu/careers.

Design: create software, networks, digital video and television, handheld applications, and multiuser virtual environments that will enhance learning. implementation: explore the latest technologies and assess their potential to transform educational practice. research: formulate rigorous, practical ways to evaluate the appeal and effectiveness of media and technology for learning.
Many students choose to deepen their program experience with an internship, taking advantage of the rich variety of research projects, educational technology firms, and media production organizations in the Boston area.

Contact information
admissions liaison: Gregg Glover e-mail: askgregg@gse.harvard.edu faculty director: Joseph Blatt Program coordinator: Rilda Kissel mailing address: Technology, Innovation, and Education Program Harvard Graduate School of Education 13 Appian Way, 321 Longfellow Hall Cambridge, MA 02138 Web address: www.gse.harvard.edu/tie

Why HGse?
To be a TIE student is to combine your passion for innovative technologies with a deep understanding of the contemporary practices, policies, and research shaping the future of education. Here, you can deepen your learning through such HGSE initiatives as WIDE World, a global network for professional development. You will be at the center of diverse fields of inquiry at the Ed School, participating in and sharing discoveries from cutting-edge research, such as multiuser virtual environments and online, real-time assessment. And you will find extensive opportunities to connect theory and practice. For example, the Informal Learning for Children course is part of the Ed School’s collaboration with Sesame Workshop, the nonprofit educational organization behind Sesame Street. The course brings visiting Sesame Workshop lecturers, internships, and research opportunities to TIE students. Similarly, students worked with NASA’s Public Engagement Program to evaluate the effectiveness of its Mars Student Imaging Project. TIE courses also give students the chance to learn through local educational institutions. Recently, students evaluated Wild Kratts, a children’s television series, and presented their findings to the producers for use in program planning and website development.

Associate producer, public television, Boston Product manager, high-tech education company, Washington, D.C. Technology integration coordinator, Hawaii Instructional designer, public university, Minnesota Exhibit network manager, science museum, Ithaca, N.Y.

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As a TIE student, I have learned from the world’s best minds in both education and education-related technologies. I have learned to apply cutting-edge education research in finding cutting-edge, technology-driven learning solutions. And I know the connections and mentors I’ve found at Harvard will open professional doors for me back home in ways no other school ever can.
Jennifer Cottle

Why Harvard?
Harvard University, with its rich history of pioneering intellectual and interdisciplinary breakthroughs in every field, offers students an ideal learning environment. Here, you’ll find numerous opportunities to opt for elective courses at any of the university’s other world-class graduate schools, or to take advantage of the many additional learning opportunities available at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. For example, students have opportunities to learn about entrepreneurship at the Harvard Business School, leadership at the Harvard Kennedy School, and nutrition and wellness at the Harvard School of Public Health.

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for more on how our students, faculty, and alumni are impacting the world, visit: www.gse.harvard.edu/impact.

“I knew I’d found my calling the first time I saw a little girl’s face light up in an elementary classroom as she finally understood a math problem she was tackling,” smiles Jennifer Cottle, who began her undergraduate education as a psychology major, before switching to education. “But after seven years of teaching and designing curricula in many different classroom settings with different populations of learners across Peru, I found myself becoming increasingly frustrated. “The entire system seemed to be stuck in a rut where the rich continued to get educated, while the poor continued to be denied access to high-quality education. To me, it seemed obvious that technology could play a critical role in changing this equation; that technological solutions were the future in preparing different kinds of learners for success. But everyone seemed so afraid of change. So I simply quit my job one day and began to look around for a graduate program. Not just any program, but one that would prepare me to lead the way in using innovative technologies to impact education across Peru. “The TIE Program has been life-changing. I’m surrounded by bright, talented classmates from every possible background — musicians, doctors, TV producers — all as passionate about impacting their communities and their professions through education as I am. I’ve learned about every aspect of education from professors who’re not just the best in their fields, but incredibly focused on helping me with my individual goals. And every day, I get to interact with leaders from different fields who are successfully using new technologies to create innovative learning and teaching solutions.”
Jennifer a. Cottle lima, Peru ed.M., Technology, innovation, and education

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doctor of education leadership (ed.l.d.)
The Program
The Ed.L.D. program integrates the thought-provoking insights, leading-edge practices, and world-renowned scholarship from three notable schools — the Harvard Graduate School of Education, the Harvard Business School, and the Harvard Kennedy School . This threeyear, full-time, cohort-based program delivers the conceptual framework, practical skills, and professional experiences necessary to positively transform American educational communities at the system level. You will engage in an ambitious and rigorous curriculum, multi-disciplinary in design and collaborative in character, which will empower you to clarify, refine, and realize your vision as an educational leader. The program’s innovative and integrated core curriculum is guided by state-of-the-art professional principles. In addressing the overarching question — “How does one positively transform education at the system level?”— the Doctoral Program in Education Leadership not only enables you to develop a deep understanding of how the U.S. education sector functions, but also a sense of the modes by which it can be reshaped in the future, including an in-depth knowledge of the history, structures, policies, politics, and levers for change. The program emphasizes learning and teaching, as well as leadership and management; it also incorporates analysis of comparative examples of best practices from other countries. During the second year, you will work closely with advisors to select electives offered at HGSE and other schools within Harvard University. And, you will experience a variety of pedagogies that place you in the role of an education leader, as well as meet the major players currently involved in enabling sectoral-level change. In addition, you will be expected to transform yourself through a variety of experiences in the year one curriculum, including individualized executive coaching and yearlong learning teams. The program culminates with one of the most distinctive aspects of the Ed.L.D. program: a paid residency in a substantive leadership role at a practice site offered by our extensive nationwide network of partnering organizations, combined with intensive workshops at HGSE. This opportunity will form a critical part of your preparation to impact the field as a change agent, an educator, and a leader who helps transform complex education institutions into organizations equipped for continuous improvement.

Frequently asked Questions
What kinds of academic and/or work experience is required for admission to the ed.l.d. program?
The strongest candidates will demonstrate a commitment to the transformation of the American preK–12 education sector and readiness for senior-level work in the field. We expect that applicants will come from a variety of prior work experiences that include significant demonstrated leadership. We do not require a minimum number of years or a specific type of work experience for admission to the program. Neither a degree in education nor a master’s degree is required.

How competitive is admission to the ed.l.d program?
The HGSE Doctor of Education Leadership, the only program of its kind, is of particular interest to leaders from a wide range of education-related fields, including schools, business, government, research, and the policy, nonprofit, and corporate sectors. Admission to this innovative, full-time program is highly selective.

The Community
Among the many distinctive strengths of the program is the unparalleled community of faculty and peers. You will work closely with faculty, such as Monica Higgins, acclaimed for her insights in the areas of leadership development and organizational change. At the same time, you will discover the powerful insights of program faculty outside of HGSE, such as Marshall Ganz of the Harvard Kennedy School, a national leader in community and issue organizing and voter mobilization strategies for political campaigns. You will also learn from — and develop enduring professional relationships and friendships with — other talented students and leaders who have worked inside and outside of schools and school districts, improved educational opportunities for underserved students, and more.

How is the third year residency determined?
Students will work closely with Ed.L.D. program faculty during their second year to determine the best match with a partner organization for their third year residency. We will take a number of factors into account, including students’ career goals and geographic preferences. In addition, we expect that the current list of partners will continue to grow based on organizational and student interest.

What kind of financial aid is available to ed.l.d. students?
All Ed.L.D. students will receive a full tuition funding package, which includes support for living expenses in years one and two, as well as a paid residency in year three. For more information on Ed.L.D. funding, please visit www.gse.harvard.edu/financialaid.

after HGse
After the program, you will be prepared for a variety of long-term, system-level leadership responsibilities in organizations such as school districts, departments of education, policy organizations, nonprofits or missionbased for-profits, and foundations.

Contact information
admissions liaison: Julie Vultaggio e-mail: askjuliev@gse.harvard.edu executive director: Elizabeth City Program coordinator: Amanda Wellum

sample Partner (residency) sites
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mailing address:
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Achieve, Inc. Aspire Public Schools Boston Public Schools Chicago Public Schools Education Trust

National Center on Education and the Economy The New Teacher Project New York City Department of Education Public Education Network Uncommon Schools

Ed.L.D. Admissions Harvard Graduate School of Education 13 Appian Way, 112 Longfellow Hall Cambridge, MA 02138 Web address: www.gse.harvard.edu/edld

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for more on how our students, faculty, and alumni are impacting the world, visit: www.gse.harvard.edu/impact.

If the words “risk-taker” and “education” don’t go together in your vocabulary, perhaps you’ve never met susan Cheng. Susan, who describes herself as a “courageous risk-taker for reform,” is part of Harvard’s first Ed.L.D. Program cohort. “I believe education reform is the civil rights issue of our day that I will spend my life’s talents tackling,” says Susan. Susan played a critical role in Chancellor Michelle Rhee’s efforts to reform the Washington, D.C. Public Schools (DCPS). She also created and ran the district’s Urban Education Leaders Internship Program and developed strategies for integrating teacher input within the central office. Prior to joining DCPS, Susan volunteered with Partners in Health in Rwanda, worked in the D.C. Mayor’s office, and managed a portfolio of education and environmental justice programs for the Greenlining Institute in California. “As a social entrepreneur at heart, the prospect of both experiencing and shaping the Ed.L.D. Program as part of the first cohort is exciting. I’m most interested in exploring how lasting education reform can sustain itself beyond changing political administrations and agendas,” Susan says. “And I’d like to determine what type of central office professional development and training education systems should provide.”
susan Cheng Washington, D.C. ed.l.D. candidate

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doctor of education (ed.d.)
The Program
If you aspire to make an impact on the lives of learners by playing a critical role in the education, government, policy, nonprofit, or corporate sectors, then HGSE’s Ed.D. program will equip you with the knowledge and research skills to improve educational outcomes in the United States and around the world. It is particularly relevant to individuals seeking careers in academia and research, as well as those interested in scholarly approaches to developing effective education practice in both preK–12 and higher education. The program blends academic rigor, flexibility, and autonomy with an emphasis on gaining deep knowledge about the education field and about how education research influences policy and practice. There is a rich and proven history of developing scholars and leaders — Harvard originated the Ed.D. in 1921; today, we continue to offer doctoral students an outstanding academic atmosphere, mentorship by leading faculty, and unparalleled training that combines rigorous research with a deep understanding of the field to solve complex problems in education. literacy development, learning disabilities, and educational assessment. To complement your chosen area of study, you can take advantage of the rich resources available at HGSE and across Harvard. Doctoral students have the opportunity to join faculty-led projects that investigate and contribute to our knowledge of educational research and policy or studies that inform and improve educational practice. Recent examples include:
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within the Ed.D. program. While each concentration focuses on a specific area of study, all of the concentrations are interdisciplinary in nature. This ensures that regardless of your specialization, you will gain the knowledge and skills you need reflect upon diverse other perspectives as well as lead in the world’s efforts to resolve the multidimensional challenges facing educators today. Culture, Communities, and education focuses on addressing a wide range of increasingly complex issues — from shifts in cultural practices and racial, ethnic, and linguistic diversity to the implications of these shifts for human development, social development, and education. Central to the concentration is research on the factors that put children or youth at a disadvantage, and those assets — family, community, or cultural — that support high levels of academic, social, and moral development; healthy individuals; and effective schools. The concentration prepares students to examine these issues from multiple perspectives and through multiple stages: at the level of the individual; at the school and the neighborhood/community levels in which schools are embedded; and at the national and international levels, where crosscultural concerns, including globalization, immigration, multiculturalism, and citizenship, are of paramount importance.

a U.S. Department of Education I3 grant to promote summer reading and close the achievement gap for lowincome children, a comparative study of test-based educational accountability systems in different countries, a project on second-stage teachers, an examination of the consequences for high school students who fail state exit examinations, the development of a Multi-User Virtual Environment (MUVE)-based ecosystems science curriculum, and a program evaluation of the efficacy of vocabulary instruction in urban middle schools.

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education Policy, leadership, and instructional Practice examines learning among children, adolescents, and adults and its connections to the organizations, institutions, and policy settings in which it occurs. Focusing on the broad and critical role of leaders in shaping learning strategies and environments within different educational organizations, this concentration helps develop researchers and practitioners with strong methodological and theoretical skills whose main interest is the development of knowledge useful to the improvement of learning. As a graduate, you will make a significant impact toward transforming the conditions that support the learning of children, adolescents, and adults through the systematic application of research to practice. Higher education is an ideal concentration for those who seek to assume leadership positions as researchers, faculty members, administrators, and policy analysts in colleges and universities, research institutes, and state and federal organizations. A comprehensive exploration of historical and contemporary issues within higher education, the curriculum emphasizes leadership, administration, and governance; policymaking and decision making; planning and finance; and diversity. This concentration will prepare you as a leader by enabling you to fully study and reflect upon the course of American education.

Human Development and education looks at development throughout the life span, from infancy through adulthood. Special consideration is given to how issues of cognitive, social, and emotional development intersect with community and cultural contexts. The strengths of the faculty include the following broad topics: language and literacy; mind, brain, and education; early childhood development; and children at risk. As a graduate, you will be able to apply developmental research to address issues in education policy and practice. Quantitative Policy analysis in education is highly structured course of study and incorporates three distinctive strands of coursework: rigorous training in quantitative research methods, in-depth disciplinary study, and substantive study of educational institutions and policies. In addition to the core curriculum, you will complete an acceptable course sequence appropriate to your specific academic interests, as well as a minimum of one intensive research apprenticeship. Enabling you to gain a broad and deep theoretical foundation, even as you develop your own individual research focus, this concentration will prepare you for meaningful, rewarding research careers within academia, research institutes, and various other education related organizations.

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Why HGSe?
HGSE prepares you to be a leader who will contribute solutions to education’s most pressing challenges. By joining a community of scholars who work at the nexus of practice, policy, and research, your experience at HGSE equips you with the skills and perspectives to make a difference. You will forge a personal network of meaningful, lasting relationships with fellow students and faculty. Our premier faculty, experts in their fields, pursue research and practice in areas such as school reform, education policy, early childhood development, math and science education, teacher quality and development, learning, cognition and the brain, language and

Ed.D. students have also been very successful in attaining prestigious national fellowships such as the Spencer Dissertation Fellowship, Fulbright Fellowship, Elizabeth Munsterberg Koppitz Fellowship, Adolescent Literacy Predoctoral Fellowship, and AAUW American Fellowship. For students at HGSE, the network of support and opportunities even extends beyond the Ed School campus to the university, where doctoral students can choose to enhance their course of study by taking electives at any of Harvard’s other graduate schools.

If you’re looking for a graduate school with a heart, where you can not only work with the world’s best scholars and put your theoretical ideas and research to the test in rigorous ways, but also remain powerfully connected to the realworld impact of your work and its ability to transform actual learning strategies and environments, there’s simply no better choice in the world than HGSE.
Flossie Chua

Program concentrations
In order to provide students with the flexibility and independence required for them to shape their own individualized courses of study, HGSE offers a choice of five concentrations

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for more on how our students, faculty, and alumni are impacting the world, visit: www.gse.harvard.edu/impact.

“To be an HGSE student is to embrace a deeply rigorous, refreshing, and satisfying process of deliberation, discussion, and challenge,” declares Flossie Chua passionately. Clearly, Flossie thrives on such vigor. After all, her own story is the kind that can inspire entire communities to challenge themselves to dream bigger and achieve more. Her father, a bus driver in Singapore, was the sole provider for a family of six and Flossie’s high school education, alone, came at great cost. However, Flossie not only proved to be a brilliant student, but a star athlete who was chosen to represent her nation in field hockey at the Junior World Cup. Later, having won a public service commission university scholarship, Flossie earned an undergraduate degree in literature, a master’s degree in education, and began working for Singapore’s Ministry of Education as an educator. “I worked with gifted students and with those who had difficulty learning, with students from affluent backgrounds and with those who could barely afford lunch every day,” she explains. “It made me think hard about pedagogy, curriculum, learning, and teaching in ways I never ever had before. It’s why I came to HGSE. I wanted an answer to a single, all-important question: what makes a great teacher?” Having earned an Ed.M. in Learning and Teaching, Flossie was invited to do an internship at Project Zero, and, subsequently, admitted to the Ed.D. program. Why HGSE? “Because of the incredible faculty here and their focus on connecting research to practice and policymaking, as well as the unmatched resources Harvard offers toward interdisciplinary work. But most of all, because this is a community that shares my passion for finding the most effective ways to enable students to transform their lives through education.”
Flossie Chua singapore ed.D. Candidate

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doctor of education (ed.d.) (ed.d.)
The Community
The breadth and quality of our course offerings and our world-class faculty may be the primary factors that attract students to the Ed.D. program, but talk to some of our graduates and they’ll tell you that what they remember most about their HGSE experience is the extraordinary sense of community that they discovered here. As a doctoral student, you’ll form professional relationships, networks, and friendships — with fellow students from an array of backgrounds, with faculty from across the Ed School, as well as across the university, perhaps even with our alumni across the nation and beyond — that will last long after you graduate. In addition to learning to understand one another’s diverse perspectives in class, students often form informal study groups — within and across cohorts — to support, encourage, and sometimes challenge one another as they deal with their coursework and dissertation work. And whether it is being assigned an individual librarian to help you with your information needs at the Gutman Library or having access to the invaluable counselors and resources of the Career Services Office, everywhere, you’ll find a culture of support that makes it easier for you to achieve your academic and professional goals.
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Assistant dean/faculty, Tufts University School of Medicine Provost, Teacher U, Hunter College Deputy Director of Education, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation Senior early childhood care and development specialist, Save the Children Associate policy researcher, RAND Corporation Researcher, Mathematica Policy Research Research associate, MDRC Postdoctoral fellow, University of Connecticut Postdoctoral fellow, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Frequently asked Questions
How competitive is admission to the ed.D. program?
The HGSE Ed.D. program, a research-intensive degree comparable to the Ph.D. in education offered by other institutions, is highly sought-after by aspiring scholars, researchers, policymakers, and leaders across a wide range of education-related fields, including education research, schools, government, and the policy, nonprofit, and corporate sectors. Admission to this rigorous, full-time program is highly selective.

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Do i need to have a master’s degree and/or related work experience to be considered for admission?
Neither a master’s degree nor related work experience are requirements. However, perhaps because of the competitive nature of the program, successful applicants are those who possess a strong academic profile, including GRE scores, work experience, and demonstrated research and leadership potential. Many also have graduate degrees in education or in related fields, and most have an average of five to six years of relevant work and/or research experience in the fields that interest them.

For more information, visit the ed school’s Career services office or online at www.gse.harvard.edu/careers.

General requirements
With a requirement of two years of full-time coursework (16 courses), a qualifying paper, and a dissertation, the Ed.D. program takes from four to seven years to complete. In consultation with their faculty advisors, students design their own programs of study incorporating required and recommended courses. Offering an understanding of the interrelatedness of education practice, policy, and research, the core curriculum is comprised of rigorous training in both qualitative and quantitative methods, as well as a teamtaught interdisciplinary course on the major concepts in education. The recommended courses include those offered by HGSE, as well as by the faculty of Arts and Sciences (departments of anthropology, economics, linguistics, psychology, sociology, and statistics, among others); the Harvard School of Public Health; the Harvard Kennedy School; and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. as an ed.D. student, you will be required to take:
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Do you accept transfer credits from other universities?
The Ed School does not accept transfer credits from other universities. However, students who have graduated from the Ed School within three years of enrolling as Ed.D. students will receive academic credit for four courses (16 credits) completed during their Ed.M. or C.A.S. course of study.

What kind of financial aid is available for ed.D. students?
All Ed.D. students receive a five-year funding package, covering full tuition and health fees. It also includes stipend support in year one and guaranteed income through work (e.g., teaching fellowships and research assistantships) in years two through five. Select Ed.D. students receive the Harvard University Presidential Scholarship, which provides additional stipend support to doctoral students who show exceptional promise. For complete information on available fellowships and scholarships, please visit www.gse.harvard.edu/financialaid.

after HGse
The Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) program is designed to enable students to draw upon resources — both at the Ed School and across Harvard University — in order to understand education research, policy, and practice, as well as the connections and relationships among them. Not surprisingly, our graduates go on to become scholars and leaders who impact the world of education, often in profound ways. You’ll find them serving students across the globe, as university faculty members, senior-level educational advisors, researchers, and policymakers. recent ed.D. graduates serve in such positions as:
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Contact information
admissions liaison: Julia Deland or Gregg Glover e-mail: askjulia@gse.harvard.edu or askgregg@gse.harvard.edu assistant dean: Shu-Ling Chen Program coordinator: Stacy Peazant mailing address: Ed.D. Admissions Harvard Graduate School of Education 13 Appian Way, 114 Longfellow Hall Cambridge, MA 02138 Web address: www.gse.harvard.edu/edd

Faculty
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The first-year core course S-460, Integrating Perspectives on Education Five research methods courses, including: s-040 Introduction to Quantitative Research, Data Analysis, and Statistical Modeling s-504 Introduction to Qualitative Research, or s-710B Observation and Participation in Qualitative Research, and s-710C, Interviewing in Qualitative Research (taken in combination)

Bates College Brown University Columbia University Michigan State University University of California, Davis University of Texas, Austin Vanderbilt University Wellesley College

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In addition, Ed.D. students must take at least three advanced research methods courses.

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for more on how our students, faculty, and alumni are impacting the world, visit: www.gse.harvard.edu/impact.

“If your goal is to make a significant impact in the field of education, there’s no better step toward that goal than HGSE’s Ed.D. program,” says Marc Johnson. “It’s a unique intersection of research, policy, and practice where your ambition, imagination, and dreams can both thrive and be transformed into real achievement. And while the faculty are some of the biggest, most renowned authorities in their fields, they are incredibly generous with their time, always open to new ideas, and always supportive of your work.” Born in Atlanta, Marc spent much of his childhood in Colón in the Republic of Panama where his father, a teacher, was posted by the U.S. Department of Defense. “I returned home as an undergraduate thinking of a career in teaching. But as a junior, I stumbled upon a magazine review about a book they said all college presidents should read. I still can’t quite explain why, but I tracked that book down, read it in one sitting, and knew, after, that I would be a college president myself someday. Perhaps it was just that a college presidency represented an opportunity to be the kind of leader who could transform careers and lives. “I earned my master’s degree in higher education almost 10 years ago and only decided to pursue a doctoral degree after working in a variety of roles across higher education within different institutions,” continues Marc. “I looked at several programs, but frankly, I just couldn’t find another school that offered the unique combination of sheer rigor and quality, opportunity, resources, flexibility, connections, and sense of community that HGSE does.”
Marc Johnson Palmyra, Missouri ed.D. Candidate

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applying for admission
Step i: introduce Yourself
Just as you desire to learn more about HGSE, we would like to know more about you. You’re invited to fill out a form at www.gse.harvard.edu/ admissions/prospect. By introducing yourself in this way, we can make certain that you receive the information that is most pertinent to you and your interests and needs. If you are planning a visit to campus
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Class observations during the fall and spring semesters

criterion for admission. What the Ed School looks for are students with a passion for education, diverse life and work experiences, and a deep commitment to making an impact in the world — as educators, researchers, policymakers, and service-minded leaders of character and integrity. If that describes you, we look forward to hearing from you soon. if you’re ready to apply, please note that a completed application consists of the following:
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Any additional requirements as specified by the program

deadlines
For the 2012–13 academic year, the deadlines for submission of the online application form and receipt of all other materials are: ed.D. and ed.l.D. ed.M. December 14, 2011 January 4, 2012

All of these opportunities are intended to provide you with the information you need about the Ed School, academic programs, student life, and application process. To view a complete list of ways to connect with HGSE and to sign up, please visit www. gse.harvard.edu/admissions/events.

Interviews are not a part of the Ed.D. or Ed.M. admissions process. For the Ed.L.D., a select number of the most promising candidates will be invited to campus for required interviews with members of the admissions committee. For all of the information you need regarding admissions and financial aid, visit www.gse.harvard.edu/admissions.

For more information, please refer to www.gse.harvard.edu/admissions/apply.

Step ii: visit our campus
You are drawn to HGSE’s mission, to the idea of collaborating with faculty, to the opportunity to connect theory with research and practice. As you continue to gather information, we encourage you to visit campus or attend one of the many admissions events we host throughout the year, such as:
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and would like guidance, we ask that you contact the Admissions Office in advance at gseadmissions@harvard. edu or 617–495–3414.

directions to campus

HGSE, located in the heart of Harvard Square on

Appian Way, is just a short distance from the Harvard Square subway station and is accessible by various modes of transportation. For detailed directions, please visit www.gse.harvard.edu/directions. First Church
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Application form (available online) $85 application fee (paid via credit card through the online application) Statement of purpose Three letters of recommendation (submitted online) Resume Official transcript(s) from each postsecondary institution attended International transcript request form for each institution outside the United States (available online) Standardized test score(s):
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ready to impact the World?
By applying to HGSE, you will be taking a step toward joining other bright,

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talented, and experienced students who have the desire to transform lives through education. Our student body

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On-campus open house events in the fall Annual Diversity Recruitment Program in October Information sessions in cities across the U.S. and online Informal small group sessions offered weekday mornings from May to early December Saturday morning sessions scheduled once a month in October and November Individual half-hour appointment with an admissions representative

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is made up of individuals from around the world who seek an education that prepares them to impact not only the world of education, but also the lives of the communities in which they live, learn, and lead. While our admissions process is highly selective, it is also personalized, comprehensive, and fair. There is no single formula or
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GRE (mandatory for all applicants; GMAT may be submitted instead for Ed.L.D. only) TOEFL (for applicants whose native language is not English or whose baccalaureate is not from a college or university where English is the language of instruction)

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Who Studies at HGSe?
2010–2011 Entering Class
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Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) Students: 29 Doctor of Education Leadership (Ed.L.D.) Students: 25 Master of Education (Ed.M.) Students: 629

Harvard Graduate School of education — at a Glance
Mission: To prepare leaders in education and to generate knowledge to improve student opportunity, achievement, and success. Programs: HGSE offers 13 master’s (Ed.M.) degree programs (Arts in Education; Education Policy and Management; Higher Education; Human Development and Psychology; International Education Policy; Language and Literacy; Learning and Teaching; Mind, Brain, and Education; Prevention Science and Practice; School Leadership; Special Studies; Teacher Education; and Technology, Innovation, and Education); a Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) program with five concentrations (Culture, Communities, and Education; Education Policy, Leadership, and Instructional Practice; Human Development and Education; Higher Education; and Quantitative Policy Analysis in Education); a Doctor of Education Leadership (Ed.L.D.) program; and a Certificate of Advanced Study (C.A.S.) in Counseling. students: Prior to enrolling at the Ed School, Ed.M. students average five years of professional experience; Ed.D. students, six; and Ed.L.D. students, 11. They have served as teachers, school and district administrators, policymakers, counselors, researchers, program directors, and college and university administrators in public and private schools, nonprofit organizations, international organizations, and corporations. Faculty: More than 100 faculty members guide approximately 900 students in degree programs and provide training through professional development and executive outreach programs. Graduates: Our 25,000 graduates have gone on to impact the world by holding national and international educational roles. They are practitioners, policymakers, and researchers dedicated to improving the field of education. During the 2010–2011 academic year, the Ed School granted 47 Ed.D. degrees and 649 Ed.M. degrees.

rate of Study
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Full-time: 96 percent Part-time: 4 percent

Gender ratio
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Female: 74 percent Male: 26 percent

Geographical distribution
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44 states, D.C., and 35 countries

international Students
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12 percent of student body

Students of color
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31 percent of student body

age breakdown
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Ed.D. Students Range: 24–41 Average: 30 Ed.L.D. Students Range: 28–48 Average: 35 Ed.M. Students Range: 21–61 Average: 29

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Years of Work experience
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Ed.D. Students Range: 0–14 Average: 6 Ed.L.D. Students Range: 6–26 Average: 11 Ed.M. Students Range: 0–37 Average: 5

fellowships and financial aid
HGSE offers a number of fellowship opportunities for students, with many featuring full tuition support. Individuals considering master’s studies may apply for programs such as the urban Scholars program (experienced urban educators) and the leadership in education program (individuals with strong leadership potential) at the time they apply for admission. In addition, need-based grant, loan, and employment support is available. At the doctoral level, all students are eligible to receive a multiyear full-tuition funding package. The Harvard University Presidential fellowship provides additional support to selected Ed.D. students who show exceptional promise. We encourage you to complete the financial aid application by the February 3, 2012, deadline to be considered for all sources of financial aid. For more information, visit our website at www.gse.harvard.edu/financialaid.

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2011–2012 Admitted Class
General Record Test (GRE)
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Ed.D. Averages Verbal: 650 Quantitative: 700 Analytical Writing: 5 Ed.M. Averages Verbal: 600 Quantitative: 660 Analytical Writing: 5

tuition for the 2011–2012 academic Year*
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Full-time students (per academic year): $36,992 Part-time students (per course/per term): $4,624

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*Tuition is determined each year and is subject to change. Please visit our website for a complete, up-to-date list of all tuition costs.

At the Harvard Graduate School of Education, our faculty and students work at the nexus of practice, policy, and research, because we believe that this is the most powerful way to improve education. The litmus test for everything we do is whether the activity adds value to student opportunity, achievement, and success.
Dean Kathleen McCartney
Admissions Office
111 Longfellow Hall 13 Appian Way Cambridge, MA 02138 Phone: 617–495–3414 Fax: 617–496–3577 E-mail: gseadmissions@harvard.edu www.gse.harvard.edu/admissions

Financial Aid Office
061 Longfellow Hall 13 Appian Way Cambridge, MA 02138 Phone: 617–495–3416 Fax: 617–496–0840 E-mail: finaid@gse.harvard.edu www.gse.harvard.edu/financialaid

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